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Obviously lots of different reasons, some are forced (money, health insurance) and others just enjoy it or don't have much of a life outside of work.

I know several that have told me they don't plan to retire (i.e., work until unable to).

I'm guessing once someone is financially able to retire but continues to work, the freedom of knowing they don't need the money is liberating and reduces stress.

Some of this is no different than a discussion of where you want to live in retirement (still figuring that one out) or how much money do you need. Lots of differing opinions.

I'm sure in some cases someone who has lost a spouse may choose to continue to work to avoid loneliness.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Obviously lots of different reasons, some are forced (money, health insurance) and others just enjoy it or don't have much of a life outside of work.

I know several that have told me they don't plan to retire (i.e., work until unable to).

I'm guessing once someone is financially able to retire but continues to work, the freedom of knowing they don't need the money is liberating and reduces stress.

Some of this is no different than a discussion of where you want to live in retirement (still figuring that one out) or how much money do you need. Lots of differing opinions.

I'm sure in some cases someone who has lost a spouse may choose to continue to work to avoid loneliness.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
There is a liberation associated with not have to work anymore. If I were fired today we'd be just fine. With our health issues recently it is cheaper (and easier) to keep employment insurance, so I continue working. But I don't need to work.

Hopefully what others have said about "don't know how I had time for a job" after they retire will apply to me. So far it isn't, but we do have our health issues (resolving), and the pandemic, so it likely isn't representative of the future.

In about another month it will cool off enough that I can do some outside projects (like finishing electrifying the pergola, and refinishing the front door). But that list is finite. Certainly not enough to fill 20 or 30 more years.
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I'm sure in some cases someone who has lost a spouse may choose to continue to work to avoid loneliness.

Wish I could work, but with the pandemic it's not a
"Comfortable" possible. I avoid stores and it's stressful shopping. People are getting lax on wearing masks my area. In speaking with store clerks in gas stations...people don't care.

I hope this is true for you
Hopefully what others have said about "don't know how I had time for a job" after they retire will apply to me.

nag
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BruceBrown,

I am into my third career. The first 20 yrs was the corporate gig. The second 15 years was my do what I was passionate about (and alot of hours). The third career has been working on my terms. Third career ended due to COVID and a couple of surgeries for my wife. Not sure when I will start again....

The money is not important. The flexibility and schedule is. In my last "career", I would not start before 10 am, would be done by 4 pm, and only "work" twice a week. I also told the employer when I "would" take time off - not "ask" for time off.

When COVID is over, I don't think I will work in a compensated position. The most important aspect of what I do is "having a purpose." I am "working" to stay engaged and do something for someone else.

Otherwise, life is pretty boring. :)
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nothingissimple writes:

I am into my third career. The first 20 yrs was the corporate gig. The second 15 years was my do what I was passionate about (and alot of hours). The third career has been working on my terms. Third career ended due to COVID and a couple of surgeries for my wife. Not sure when I will start again....

The money is not important. The flexibility and schedule is. In my last "career", I would not start before 10 am, would be done by 4 pm, and only "work" twice a week. I also told the employer when I "would" take time off - not "ask" for time off.

When COVID is over, I don't think I will work in a compensated position. The most important aspect of what I do is "having a purpose." I am "working" to stay engaged and do something for someone else.

Otherwise, life is pretty boring. :)


Thanks for the response. It's good to hear you can identify with the purpose and engagement. Certainly Covid-19 throws a monkey wrench into some well laid plans for many.

Book arrives today. It is a subject that interests me, both from the standpoint of why my parents and the parents of my DW worked beyond when they needed to for money. They worked lesser hours, less stress, etc..., but I have posted about it before. Seems the engagement, socialization, identity, etc... was most likely a big part of it. I'm sure the book will address all of my curiosity about the subject.

My final working years seem to be playing out as more of a phase into retirement.

BB
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My parents retired with a nice Ma Bell pension - and a bit of savings - and never went to work. Dad left the company at age 61 with disability pension - and mom had been working some years again as executive secretary. Dad lived till 75, mom till 82.

My grandparents - both - retired but had part time jobs. One was school crossing guard - got him out of house and he loved the kids who crossed the street he was assigned to. Other grandparent worked part time in movie theater taking tickets.. Had to get out of the house and meet some folks. GP 1 lived till 75. Grandma till 80. Other grandparents lived till early 80s.

Me? retired at 52. Played around first year with some small consulting jobs...... for the heck of it - but industry cratered a year later and jobs dried up - and didn't worry about it. Never looked back. 22 years later and not going back to work. Busy enough - well, was before this COVID stuff wiped out all events everywhere and most reasons for travel.

In the same house now for 30 years. No change expected any time soon.

t.
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I worked until I was 69 because I enjoyed it and all the people that reported to me laughed at my jokes.

Come to think of it, they were the only ones that laughed at my jokes.

Weird coincidence, isn’t it?

AW
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I worked until I was 69 because I enjoyed it and all the people that reported to me laughed at my jokes.

Come to think of it, they were the only ones that laughed at my jokes.

Weird coincidence, isn’t it?

AW


The good news it that you remembered your jokes!

BB
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No. of Recommendations: 3
The good news it that you remembered your jokes!

BB


But did he remember that he told the same joke yesterday?

CNC
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