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Been a while since anyone said much here, so here's my idiot question.

Is anything off topic here?

I have a fair mid-range audio setup in my office (I took over one of our bedrooms.) I have a Denon surround sound amplifier (Does anyone make surround sound any more? Seems like a gimmick to me.) played through a set of M&K speakers, pretty good mid-range. With M&K sub-woofer.

But, I was not content to only hear sound in my room, so when we moved into this house I had speakers installed in every room, mostly in the ceiling, and outside in the back yard. As luck would have it, this is too great a load for the Denon, so I got a big Pioneer amp at Best Buy (on the clearance rack). Feed the Pioneer from the Denon and the Pioneer powers all those speakers. (All my stuff is in the closet. It's an impressive closet by now with all those wires and pieces of electronics.) Everything is in order, God is in heaven, and I can hear music throughout the house. Enter the Countess, with her collection of girl group CD's. She set the 200 disk CD player full of her girl groups, and after while she was complaining. The music fades out on some of the CD's. Not all the CD's, but some. She's right. It is clear as can be in my room, but definitely fades out in the rest of the house.

Why? Is a puzzlement. I am not an electrical genius (Only a mechanical one.) But some of the CD's play just fine. Some refuse to play certain bands. Other bands on the same CD are fine. We suspect the original source material may have been analog, and something in the process of digitizing made the Pioneer refuse to play it. I can't blame the Pioneer amplifier. The Denon continues to play perfectly in my office.

Do any of you smart fellers (or smart girls) know what's happening here? To quote Spock, "This is not logical."

CNC
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On the one hand I think it sounds like a DRM problem. Digital Rights Management.

Try googling music cd drm.

On the other hand, the CD standard does not allow DRM. Though some record companies tried it anyway.

Are those disks all read-only originals? Any of them burned copies? MP3s?

Is the link to the Pioneer digital? If so, the format being sent might be one the Pioneer DAC doesn’t handle.

As for surround sound, there is very little going on on the audio side, but in Home Theatre it is huge.
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RHinCT: On the one hand I think it sounds like a DRM problem. Digital Rights Management.

Try googling music cd drm.

On the other hand, the CD standard does not allow DRM. Though some record companies tried it anyway.

Are those disks all read-only originals? Any of them burned copies? MP3s?


These are rather elderly CD's for the most part. Bought at the store. The Countess has collected them over the years.

Is the link to the Pioneer digital? If so, the format being sent might be one the Pioneer DAC doesn’t handle.


Coax wire from the Denon to the Pioneer (Which is stereo only - no surround sound.) Nothing fancy.

As for surround sound, there is very little going on on the audio side, but in Home Theatre it is huge.


Heh. I do have a Denon DVD player. It isn't even plugged in to the TV. I can see the lack of interest in audio surround sound, but the Denon does have artificial surround sound so all five speakers get sound. We did rent the first Jurasssic Park DVD and it was fun to hear the little critters go behind us.

For now, if she really wants to hear certain of her CD's she will just have to go to my office to hear them.

She had an inspiration: Some of the "problem children" seem to be ADD or even AAD, so the original material was analog and later remastered. One Petula Clark CD was made in in England and has no indication. From its age, likely the original was analog.

Thanks very much for your input. This has been a bit of an education.

CNC
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Coax wire from the Denon to the Pioneer (Which is stereo only - no surround sound.) Nothing fancy.

Some digital links look like ordinary RCA connectors, so that doesn't establish for certain that it is an analog connection. See https://www.monoprice.com/category/cables/audio-cables/digit....

AAD, ADD or DDD should make no difference. The third character, D, is what is stored on a CD.
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Could it be how the sound was encoded? Just a wild guess that is probably wrong, but...

In your office you have the full set of speakers, yes? L-R, front-back, and maybe center? But in the other rooms you probably only have two? Maybe the amp is sending the sound based on your configuration (your office), and also to the other rooms that don't have all those speakers. So the sound never gets to the speakers that don't exist, and you hear it as missing sound, and sound fading in and out.

Maybe?

If you switch your receiver to a not-surround mode (just two-speaker stereo), does it fix the problem?

Like I said, wild guess. But that is the only thing I can think if it is CD-dependent. Some will encode for surround, some won't. Especially older CDs.
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1pg: In your office you have the full set of speakers, yes? L-R, front-back, and maybe center? But in the other rooms you probably only have two? Maybe the amp is sending the sound based on your configuration (your office), and also to the other rooms that don't have all those speakers. So the sound never gets to the speakers that don't exist, and you hear it as missing sound, and sound fading in and out.

Yes, five speakers in my office, plus the sub. The Surround Sound amp has a two (well, several) outlets - presumably to make stereo tape recordings. I run from that outlet to the Pioneer. What a rat's nest of wires back there! Six pieces of electronics, plus the TV box. It's been several years since I used the Tape deck or the DVD player, but the phono and CD player are used from time to time. TV input is used every day.

A friend had a rather more elaborate setup than mine. He put it all in a large bookcase. After seeing his setup, I decided to hide mine in a closet. (He had wires all over the place!) Reduced accessibility is one of the prices I had to pay. He (They, actually, a couple) got me into using Denon and M&K instead of Bose equipment. Costs a bit more, but I am satisfied. Except for the 15,000 separate pieces of equipment (give or take) while the Bose has only a few. (He was the anesthesiologist at a local hospital, so he was well-heeled.)

CNC
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If you switch your receiver to a not-surround mode (just two-speaker stereo), does it fix the problem?

Like I said, wild guess. But that is the only thing I can think if it is CD-dependent. Some will encode for surround, some won't. Especially older CDs.


~~~

I think 1pg might have something here CNC... please look into this.
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"I have a Denon surround sound amplifier (Does anyone make surround sound any more? Seems like a gimmick to me."

Gimmick???

To each his own. I listen to music from 5.1 recordings on SACDs, DVDs and Blu-rays. Movie tracts usually 5.1 or 7.1 Dolby or DTS. Even with the 5.1 tracks the AVR has options which can place sounds in all 9 of my speakers.

I have 7 speakers at ear level plus R & L front Heights, so 9 speakers plus a sub-woofer. Great for music and movies. That's the limit for my 6 year old Denon 4250CI. The new X8500H has amps for 13 channels plus external outputs for 2 additional channels with an added 2 channel amp.

https://www.dolby.com/us/en/guide/surround-sound-speaker-set... basically how my 7 floor speakers are positioned plus the two on the front wall about 7 feet off the floor.

Sounds move around as they might in real life, depends on how the sound engineers do their job...

No idea why some of your discs don't play...

Stay safe everyone!

Regards, Ken
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