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Thanks to Motley Fool in general and Stock Advisor in particular, we literally have no losers. Well, technically, we have a couple that are a percentage point or two down on some days ... not enough to offset capital gains if we sell anything. Our overall income is too high to add anything to our IRAs or other protected accounts.

We're rapidly approaching retirement, and we'd like to re-balance toward more conservative investments. Apple (up 234%), Amazon (up 373%), and similar stocks account for too much of our portfolio at this point. But selling is too expensive tax-wise.

Worse yet, BEAM is being sold out from under us this year, to the tune of $18,000 - a gain of about 216%.

I know it's rude to gripe about success, but sometimes it can be a pain in the butt.
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I know it's rude to gripe about success, but sometimes it can be a pain in the butt.

I think you should start picking stock losers so you don't have to gripe.

PSU
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sharleen: "Our overall income is too high to add anything to our IRAs or other protected accounts."

I a mnot a tax pro, but I wonder about the accuracy of that statement.

"If you (or your spouse) earn taxable income and are under age 70 ½, you can contribute."

http://money.cnn.com/retirement/guide/IRA_traditional.moneym...

There is no income bar to contribution to a traditional IRA, though not all contributions may be deductible.

Also, I do not believe that there is an income limit that is an absolute bar to contributing to a 401-k, though if one is an HCE, then the amount that may be contributed annually may be capped below the otherwise lawful amount.

If you are self-employeed, then I beleive that you have other options that would be available to, though I have never much reviewed them.

Regards, JAFO
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I agree. Double check with your tax pro, but I believe you can make a non-deductible contribution to a traditional IRA and then convert it to a Roth IRA.

"Ask Kim" from Kiplinger had an article on it a while back. I'd check it out.

As far as your gains go, Don't let taxes keep you from making a wise investment decision. If you have a gain and are ready to move on, take it on the chin and go. Liquidate the stock, set aside whatever rate you need to pay the tax on the gain and keep going.

You have to pop that tax bubble or it will only keep growing and be even harder to deal with down the road.

Have you maxed out an HSA contribution each year?
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I know it's rude to gripe about success, but sometimes it can be a pain in the butt.


Don't forget that you can give the appreciated stock to charity (in lieu of some of your other charitable giving) and not take the tax hit on it.

- Megan
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