Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
About ten months ago DWs 2007 VW EOS 2.0L turbo-charged started consuming oil at a quart (of synthetic) every 1,600 miles. The car has 84,000 miles. Car was purchased used in 2010 and consumed very little oil until about 10 months ago

There is no oil on floor under the car. I see no exhaust smoke.

Where is the oil going?

The VW dealer tells me this rate of oil consumption is OK - maybe not "normal" but doesn't indicate a problem.

What do you think?

Jerry
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
A qt every 1.6k isn't alarming, but it is some consumption.

I assume the oil on the dipstick looks like just oil, not a milkshake? With a turbo motor, a leaking head gasket can allow oil and coolant to mix - very bad when that happens. What does your coolant look like? What does the oil look like?

Both of my cars burn some oil, although not as quickly as you've indicated. Like you, neither one has ever put a drop on the floor. Some engines will always do this, especially when driven hard. Some will burn more on particular oils. With my S2000, Mobil1 Synthetic is particularly notorious for burning faster than others.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Jerry, if you can, follow behind in another car and look at the exhaust during hard acceleration and suddenly no throttle. You will probably see some smoke, but who knows how much is being eliminated by the catalytic converter. You may also have a leak that's only evident under certain pressure conditions, and not at idle, when you are parking.

Richard
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
About ten months ago DWs 2007 VW EOS 2.0L turbo-charged...

Well there is the start of the problem.

...started consuming oil at a quart (of synthetic) every 1,600 miles. The car has 84,000 miles. Car was purchased used in 2010 and consumed very little oil until about 10 months ago

There is no oil on floor under the car. I see no exhaust smoke.

Where is the oil going?


A few possibilities. Look at the coolant in the low pressure reservoir. Does it look like foamy chocolate milk or muddy water? Head gasket leak. Oil is mixing with coolant, coolant is mixing with oil. You can also go to any shop and ask for a "hydrocarbon" test on the coolant. Most shops (not a dealer) will do it for free. If you have hydrocarbon in your coolant, head gasket leak.

You could be leaking oil through seals in the internals of the engine. Most of this would burn off at this rate. As another poster noted, if you do a drive by or have someone follow behind, a hard acceleration followed by lifting completely off the accelerator may result in some white or blue tinged smoke. This is also a bad sign.

You can also lay down at the front of the car with a flashlight. Is there any sign of oil on the underside (don't do it while the engine is hot). The oil pan is typically distinctive on a car, it is at the low part of the engine bay underside and typically flat. Run your finger over it. Covered in greasy black yeck that is more than a very thin coating thick? You're leaking oil from an external seal (that isn't terrible).

The VW dealer tells me this rate of oil consumption is OK - maybe not "normal" but doesn't indicate a problem.

What do you think?


You've been told right. Even if there is a slight problem, the cost of a quart of oil every 1,600 miles is a lot cheaper than an engine rebuild at this point. If the consumption gets worse - and you start moving to one quart per 1,000 miles or less, you have a growing problem. At 500 miles per quart congrats, you now have a TDI EOS until the fuel injectors foul, the head gasket completely gives up, or the catalytic converter has a full on meltdown from oil contamination. Now expensive.

My snark above with, there is the problem, is VWs aren't exactly reliable (someone will insert outrage at this comment here) and their propensity to eat ignition coils, have electrical issues, and burn oil is rather well documented.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I have read that the Porsche Cayenne has the same oil consumption issue and dealers say it's "normal".
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I have read that the Porsche Cayenne has the same oil consumption issue and dealers say it's "normal".


Most manufacturers have oil consumption "issues" due to very low weight synthetics that are used to help fuel mileage and also used as a working fluid in actuators and such and not just for lubrication. Also longer intervals between oil changes exaggerate the effects and rather than checking and topping off oil periodically, consumers wait until the light comes on and sound the alarms. Certain types of driving conditions will also cause a little more or less consumption.

Think about even a moderate 1 quart consumption every 2000 miles (well within any manufacturer's acceptable levels), a 6 quart capacity and 7500 oil change intervals. If the oil is changed even slightly after the recommended interval, there will only be 2 quarts left in at the oil change.

I do agree that the OP may have a problem since the consumption has changed suddenly and significantly.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Thanks all,

More:
There is on oil in the coolant and no coolant in the oil.

Using flashlight and mirror I see no leaks on bottom of engine. None. It is completely dry.

> follow behind in another car and look at the exhaust during hard acceleration and suddenly no throttle.

Good idea! This morning was convenient.
(1) Starting produces a barely noticeable puff of white-gray smoke.
(2) Flooring it from 40 to 70 produces noticeable gray/white (80% gray, 20% white) smoke for 3-4 seconds tapering off to none by the time she reaches 70 MPH. Personally, I wouldn't call it excessive but that is just my subjective judgement.
(3) Closing the throttle at 70 MPH produces no smoke.
(4) A normal traffic acceleration from a stop light produces no smoke.

Would you agree the oil is being burned? Rings or valve guide(s)? It uses Mobile 1 5W40 oil

Remembering this engine has a turbo is the closed throttle test really creating a negative pressure in the intake manifold? It has very little engine braking. Reminds me of my old Kawasaki two stroke - you stop it with brakes.

Your thoughts are appreciated!

Jerry
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Milligram46,

>My snark above with, there is the problem, is VWs aren't exactly reliable (someone will insert outrage at this comment here) and their propensity to eat ignition coils, have electrical issues, and burn oil is rather well documented.

Amen! The car goes to the shop about once per year. Last year it was losing power. Dealer found fuel pump "spiking." Fuel pressure would spike to 1.5 normal then immediately fall to 0.5 normal. If it ain't that it will be the CEL and some Pcode

The car is my DW's impulse toy. She always wanted a convertible. I voted not this convertible. I lost. To emphasize how much trouble they are I told her to do something we never do - get a maintenance contract. She did! About $1,500 for three years! The Landcar insurance Co. lost money on this one! Landcar has been very good about paying all the repairs.

The car is fun to drive. Good performance with good mileage. BTW the rube-Goldberg mechanism that stores the roof in the trunk that I expected to fail has worked well!

Jerry
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
ToddTruby,

>Also longer intervals between oil changes exaggerate the effects and rather than checking and topping off oil periodically, consumers wait until the light comes on and sound the alarms.

EXACTLY what happened. Last December while driving home the oil pressure light came on when she made a turn. She was able to pull to shoulder and kill engine and call me. It took over two quarts of oil! Prior to that it had not been using oil - that I know about. Got to admit I wasn't watching it like I should have.

Jerry47
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Jerry, I'd say it's burning the oil then. Might be valve guides or seals, or piston rings. Might go for years with no increase in symptoms if it's just wear, or increase tomorrow if it's cracked components. I'd just keep a couple quarts in the trunk and drive it.

Richard
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Have a look at the rubber hose between the turbo charger and the intake. If it is soft/wet/out of shape then the oil seals in the turbo are your culprit. If it is all metal plumbing then check the gaskets between the pieces for wetness or stains.
Change out the pcv valve with one from VW. Usually cheap and easy and could cause either a pressure build in the crankcase or be a passageway for oil to be drawn into the intake manifold.

Hope that helps,
Steven
Print the post Back To Top