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No. of Recommendations: 3
Olive oil has been called a "good fat" for a while now. I came across a few very recent review articles summarizing recent research aimed at understanding why it's healthful -- identifying antiinflammatory compounds, anticancer compounds, many powerful antioxidants. One intriguing observation is that olives and extra virgin olive oil have a very high lignan content, which is one of the important assets of flax seeds. I've pasted the abstracts in here--interesting reading!


sheila


Lipids. 2004 Dec;39(12):1223-31.
<n>Olive oil and modulation of cell signaling in disease prevention.
Wahle KW, Caruso D, Ochoa JJ, Quiles JL.

School of Life Sciences, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, AB25 1 HG, Scotland, United Kingdom. k.wahle-1@rgu.ac.uk

Epidemiological studies show that populations consuming a predominantly plant-based Mediterranean-style diet exhibit lower incidences of chronic diseases than those eating a northern European or North American diet. This observation has been attributed to the greater consumption of fruits and vegetables and the lower consumption of animal products, particularly fat. Although total fat intake in Mediterranean populations can be higher than in other regions (ca. 40% of calories), the greater proportion is derived from olive oil and not animals. Increased olive oil consumption is implicated in a reduction in cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and, to a lesser extent, a variety of cancers. Olive oil intake also has been shown to modulate immune function, particularly the inflammatory processes associated with the immune system. Olive oil is a nonoxidative dietary component, and the attenuation of the inflammatory process it elicits could explain its beneficial effects on disease risk since oxidative and inflammatory stresses appear to be underlying factors in the etiology of these diseases in man. The antioxidant effects of olive oil are probably due to a combination of its high oleic acid content (low oxidation potential compared with linoleic acid) and its content of a variety of plant antioxidants, particularly oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, and tyrosol. It is also possible that the high oleic acid content and a proportionate reduction in linoleic acid intake would allow a greater conversion of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) to longer-chain n-3 PUFA, which have characteristic health benefits. Adoption of a Mediterranean diet could confer health benefits in high-risk populations.



Eur J Cancer Prev. 2004 Aug;13(4):319-26.
Olives and olive oil in cancer prevention.
Owen RW, Haubner R, Wurtele G, Hull E, Spiegelhalder B, Bartsch H.

Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. R.Owen@DKFZ-Heidelberg.de

Epidemiologic studies conducted in the latter part of the twentieth century demonstrate fairly conclusively that the people of the Mediterranean basin enjoy a healthy lifestyle with decreased incidence of degenerative diseases. The data show that populations within Europe that consume the so-called 'Mediterranean diet' have lower incidences of major illnesses such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Studies have suggested that the health-conferring benefits of the Mediterranean diet are due mainly to a high consumption of fibre, fish, fruits and vegetables. More recent research has focused on other important factors such as olives and olive oil. Obviously fibre (especially wholegrain-derived products), fruits and vegetables supply an important source of dietary antioxidants. What is the contribution from olives and olive oil? Apparently the potential is extremely high but epidemiologic studies rarely investigate consumption of these very important products in-depth, perhaps due to a lack of exact information on the types and amounts of antioxidants present. Recent studies have shown that olives and olive oil contain antioxidants in abundance. Olives (especially those that have not been subjected to the Spanish brining process) contain up to 16 g/kg typified by acteosides, hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and phenyl propionic acids. Olive oil, especially extra virgin, contains smaller amounts of hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, but also contains secoiridoids and lignans in abundance. Both olives and olive oil contain substantial amounts of other compounds deemed to be anticancer agents (e.g. squalene and terpenoids) as well as the peroxidation-resistant lipid oleic acid. It seems probable that olive and olive oil consumption in southern Europe represents an important contribution to the beneficial effects on health of the Mediterranean diet.


Public Health Nutr. 2004 Oct;7(7):953-8.
Ageing and the Mediterranean diet: a review of the role of dietary fats.
Battino M, Ferreiro MS.

Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy. m.a.battino@univpm.it

Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the relationship between food and health. Concerns have been raised about dietary fats and their relative nutritional advantages or disadvantages. In investigations of the associations between health and fat intake, special emphasis has been placed on the benefits of virgin olive oil for counteracting certain neurodegenerative diseases and ageing. With respect to ageing, accumulating evidence indicates that an improvement in quality of life can be reached by modulation of the extrinsic factors that influence many ageing processes. Of the modifiable factors, nutrition appears to be one of the strongest elements known to influence the rate of ageing as well as the incidence of age-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative pathologies. This paper reviews the theory of ageing and the role of fatty acids in the mechanisms affecting its evolution. It also confirms that virgin olive oil, an essential component of the Mediterranean diet, provides large amounts of stable and not easily oxidizable fatty acids as well as remarkable quantities of powerful antioxidant molecules.

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Very nice bolding job to impart key concepts quickly.

IP,
who even uses olive oil in baking
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IP,
who even uses olive oil in baking



Hmmm....I still use butter for baking, but I use olive oil for scrambled eggs and omelets. It's delicious!


sheila
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Has anyone tried taking it straight, like a supplemental oil? I take 1-2 tablespoons of unrefined sesame oil a day, but haven't tried to do the same with olive oil. May be worth trying.

Y.
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Hmmm....I still use butter for baking, ...

My infrequent baking ususally consists of a birthday cake or two. Some things call for oil. Do you use melted butter instead?

IP
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who even uses olive oil in baking

So does the Love Chef. He says it imparts a butter flavor, but is healthier. Here is a link to his website:

http://www.thelovechef.com

Click on "recipes" and you will find he uses olive oil for baking also.

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No. of Recommendations: 2
A derivitive of Olive Leaf Extract known as d-Lenolate or d-Olea europeaea is available as an immune support supplement. I've mentioned it before on here as something I take, especially to combat any flu etc. The leaf has been proven in some studies to be more potent than the actual olive.

Foolgirlhere
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A derivitive of Olive Leaf Extract known as d-Lenolate or d-Olea europeaea is available as an immune support supplement. I've mentioned it before on here as something I take, especially to combat any flu etc. The leaf has been proven in some studies to be more potent than the actual olive.


Yes--it's something I keep on hand too.

But the leaf and the olive--which is the fruit of the tree--can't be compared. They have different compounds and are each very beneficial, but in different ways.


sheila

p.s. something I recently learned from a friend.....after I've washed something in the kitchen, I rub a tiny dab of olive oil over my damp hands for moisture rentention and lubrication. I would have thought it would feel greasy. It doesn't at all. Feels really nice! Try it.

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The leaf has been proven in some studies to be more potent than the actual olive.
-----------------------
But the leaf and the olive--which is the fruit of the tree--can't be compared
------------------------


I was referring to each as used for your immune system support, NOT as a direct comparison against each other as bio-identical....see what I mean it's moron time when dealing with you idiots

Foolgirlhere
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I was referring to each as used for your immune system support, NOT as a direct comparison against each other as bio-identical....see what I mean it's moron time when dealing with you idiots

Foolgirlhere


Responding to posts on olives and olive oil, and having said The leaf has been proven in some studies to be more potent than the actual olive, without stating that you weren't comparing them head to head....just perhaps your intent wasn't as crystal clear as you assumed--especially to those without your super-informed background.

What is the sin in making sure everyone realizes the distinction?

"moron time"....."idiots".....I guess there is nothing of real value to learn from you, after all.


sheila


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see what I mean it's moron time when dealing with you idiots

Foolgirlhere, you have to understand that no matter what you say, sheila must always be right. She's the self-proclaimed Queen Bee around here, so if anyone EVER says she's wrong or states a counter-opinion, LOOK OUT!

Please keep posting and just ignore the naysayers.
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Foolgirlhere, you have to understand that....

Please keep posting and just ignore the naysayers.



Can you please try sticking to the topics, Catherine, and leave your "baggage" out of this.
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Can you please try sticking to the topics, Catherine, and leave your "baggage" out of this.

See what I mean, sheila? You must always, always, ALWAYS have the last word.
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...see what I mean it's moron time when dealing with you idiots

Foolgirlhere


Wow. That was increadibly rude.

IP
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Wow. That was increadibly rude.

Well, you see, IP, Foolgirlhere has stated that she works within, IIRC, the supplement industry, yet every single thing she has posted has been, of course, "corrected" by sheila. Gets tiresome, that's for sure; thus the reaction by Foolgirlhere, as I sense things.

This is just a discussion board, after all, not the Spanish Inquisition.

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I suggest you reread the thread with a less prejudiced mind CC. I did not see any sort of attack at all from Sheila:

Yes--it's something I keep on hand too.

But the leaf and the olive--which is the fruit of the tree--can't be compared. They have different compounds and are each very beneficial, but in different ways.


How either of you can read anything into that is beyond me. What would have been much more appreciated would have been a discussion from foolgirlhere on why she seems to prefer the leaf extract. Her first post was an excellent addition to the thread. Her second only served to throw us yet into another cat fight.

Too bad.

InParadise,
having read every post on this board and not needing an interpretation




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Wow. That was increadibly rude.
**********************************
Well, you see, IP, Foolgirlhere has stated that she works within, IIRC, the supplement industry, yet every single thing she has posted has been, of course, "corrected" by sheila. Gets tiresome, that's for sure; thus the reaction by Foolgirlhere, as I sense things.



Hmmmm.....Foolgirlhere's initial post stated, somewhat irritably, that I was wrong, Catherine, though without explaining herself. I didn't regard her answer as a justification for rudeness. It appears that you share her attitude.


This is just a discussion board, after all,

A point I have been trying, for quite some time, to get across to you.


sheila
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Foolgirlhere's initial post stated, somewhat irritably, that I was wrong, Catherine, though without explaining herself. I didn't regard her answer as a justification for rudeness. It appears that you share her attitude.

What attitude I share is annoyance at some people's predilection for always making others wrong. It's like a hobby with you, sheila. For cryin' out loud, can't you stifle yourself?! Here's a perfect example.

I have a curiosity about the Budwig Protocol. This alternative cancer treatment has raving fans all over the Internet. Indeed, based as it is on the need for essential fatty acids, which has, in fact, been born out by Official Medicine, the so-called Budwig Protocol makes for a compelling story both from a health POV and a conspiracy--for lack of a better word--POV. Yet look how quickly this conversation deteriorated.

http://boards.fool.com/Message.asp?mid=21671744&sort=whole#21680670

sheila, you apparently have a science background. That doesn't make you the only one qualified to hold an opinion, even if others' opinions aren't as fully informed as yours. We aren't (or at least I'm not) required to defer to your POV, especially here on the Alt Board where there is very little in the way of scientific scrutiny to bolster most treatments. That's precisely why they're called "alternative." If you're going to require double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical studies for everything discussed, we may as well not even begin a thread. Some things are simply not known...yet. I have no problem with this as a starting point. Do you?

On the Official Medicine Cancer Treatment and Prevention Board, I expect heated opposition to my POV, but on an alt board, it's the nature of the beast to just throw an idea out there, warts and all, and see what happens.

Maybe you could count to ten before you begin correcting. I'm sure I'm not the only one who would appreciate it.



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I can't remember who suggested using a dab of olive oil on your hands after washing them, but thanks. I thought it a silly suggestion...fearing it'd be way too "oily" but was pleasantly surprised that it wasn't, at all.Should keep hands from drying out what with all the washing we're cautioned to do these days. Good suggestion.

Abba
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Well, you see, IP, Foolgirlhere has stated that she works within, IIRC, the supplement industry, yet every single thing she has posted has been, of course, "corrected" by sheila.

I couldn't find one single thing Foolgirlehere has posted to which sheila has responded until the Vitamin thread recently. Don't you think "every single thing" is a bit too strong?

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What attitude I share is annoyance at some people's predilection for always making others wrong. It's like a hobby with you, sheila. For cryin' out loud, can't you stifle yourself?!


Catherine, when you add together the many many posters on this board, the Cancer Treatment & Prevention board, the Health & Nutrition board, the Retirement board (and I wouldn't be surprised if there are others as well) who find many of your posts filled with continued errors, and find your attitude in various ways untenable -- I am merely one of a long and distinguished list. You have set off MANY heated exchanges with MANY other posters, and are now ignored by quite a number of them. Unfortunately, when someone disagrees with you, you mount an attack--with a barrage of links and endless paste-ins, and sarcasm and sniping--instead of simply saying that whatever the cited facts or point of view, you hold to your convictions, and leave it at that.

It doesn't penetrate, does it, that you are the only person I have this problem with. And you have these unfortunate clashes with a significant number of other posters.

I have no predilection for making others appear wrong. My standards are accuracy, honesty, and tolerance. And this is where you and I part ways.

I have asked you before, I asked again yesterday, and I ask again now -- please stop the attacks. And I will add a request to stop acting as cheerleader when you see it in someone else.


sheila

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using a dab of olive oil on your hands after washing them, but thanks. I thought it a silly suggestion...fearing it'd be way too "oily" but was pleasantly surprised that it wasn't, at all.Should keep hands from drying out what with all the washing we're cautioned to do these days. Good suggestion.


Thanks. I thought the same as you, initially. I had been visiting my friend, and she insisted that I try the olive oil after I'd washed some dishes. It felt so good, not greasy. AND IT'S RIGHT THERE--so it's not hit and miss.
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Well, I do admit to taking the opposing POV much of the time, but I attack only when I myself am attacked. So, sheila--and everyone else for that matter on the alleged "long and distinguished" list (which, by the way, so stating is another form of attack) you cite--stop attacking me, and you'll find me quite pleasant to deal with.

If you don't happen to like my posts, that's another matter. That's just too damn bad. I don't post to suit you, or anyone else.


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I attack only when I myself am attacked.

Black is white, white is black.


So, sheila--and everyone else for that matter on the alleged "long and distinguished" list (which, by the way, so stating is another form of attack)

No....it's simply injecting a needed note of reality in light of your dramatic insistence that I have it in for you.


I don't post to suit you, or anyone else.

Then why do you get your panties in such a twist when someone else's post doesn't suit you?


sheila
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Whatever, sheila. There will no point in history when you are ever wrong. So be it.

Why don't we just agree to put the hatchet away and see what happens?

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Why don't we just agree to put the hatchet away


Now you're talking!

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Walnut-olive oil cake recipe in today's Mercury News' food section:

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/living/food/recipes/11208091.htm
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