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Hello All,

It's my first post here.

I've just come back from the 90,000 miles service of my '96 Honda Accord in an Honda Service (yea, I put a lot on this car). It costed me $550 including tax for the service and front brake change and a few more things.

Now I figure that it's going to dry me up if I continue with the regular service suggested by the Honda Service.

How can I maintain my car (I want to keep it for a few more years) and save a lot? Should I study the owner manual for the service schedule and go to the Goodyear next door to perform the jobs? Should I just change old regularly only?

Thanks.

MFmahler
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Hello All,

It's my first post here.

I've just come back from the 90,000 miles service of my '96 Honda Accord in an Honda Service (yea, I put a lot on this car). It costed me $550 including tax for the service and front brake change and a few more things.

Now I figure that it's going to dry me up if I continue with the regular service suggested by the Honda Service.

How can I maintain my car (I want to keep it for a few more years) and save a lot? Should I study the owner manual for the service schedule and go to the Goodyear next door to perform the jobs? Should I just change old regularly only?

Thanks.

MFmahler

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Congratulation on your first post. I have found this board and many others to be a good source of information. Others here are probably more knowledgable than me, but I will offer my views on your problem.

It has been my experience that skimping on normal maintenance is not a good idea. However, maintenance particularly after the warranty has expired, does not have to be performed by the dealership as you pointed out.

I tend to use dealerships for maintenace during warranty, because then there is no question about whether service was done to meet warranty requirements. But after the car is out of warranty, I use independent mechanics for all maintenance and repair work. As an example of price differences, I just checked a newspaper ad from the shop I use, and their advertised price is $160 for 90,000 mile major service. Their price for brakes is $50 (front or rear). I have as much confidence in their work as I do in the dealer. At the local Infiniti dealer, Oil Changes cost $50! At the independent it is $20, but they usually have a special for $15.

The caveat in all this is finding an independent shop that is competent and trustworthy. Check with friends to see if they have someone they trust. In my area of Southern California I have seen a number independent shops that specialize in Hondas.

Hope this helps,

Bob Mc

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Beware, the lowest bidder is not always the best repair. I suggest you talk to other Honda owners you know and ask them to recommend a repair facility based on their experiences. Don't rule out the dealer. I have found their prices are competitive and the repairs are of a much higher quality. Many dealers offer lifetime warranties on certain repairs that the independants don't offer. Shop around.
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Hello All,

It's my first post here.

I've just come back from the 90,000 miles service of my '96 Honda Accord in an Honda Service (yea, I put a lot on this car). It costed me $550 including tax for the service and front brake change and a few more things.

Now I figure that it's going to dry me up if I continue with the regular service suggested by the Honda Service.

How can I maintain my car (I want to keep it for a few more years) and save a lot? Should I study the owner manual for the service schedule and go to the Goodyear next door to perform the jobs? Should I just change old regularly only?

Thanks.

MFmahler


I would also add, as a former independent and dealer technician that what you paid is very much within reason. So much so that at the risk of being rude, if 550 dollars is going to "dry you up," then perhaps you need to investigate either raising your income level or lowering your liabilities.

Now, you didn't say how much you've spent this year, or for any of the 90k miles you have on the car. You've had the vehicle for, let's say 4 years for the sake of argument. You've put roughly 25k miles a year on it, give or take. In previous figurings (which groups like AAA and others refigured a few years back), the average per year milage was around 10k. Last figure said 15. Even at 20k a year, which may or may not be high, depending on your area and job, ect., you've put 5 years of driving on your vehicle in just under 4 years. Using the 15k a year average, you've put 6 years of milage on your vehicle in just under 4 years. Just how much nonmaintanence is a vehicle entitled to in 6 years? You've also put almost as many miles as any American (made and sold, then sent to the scrap heap) vehicle made ever used to accumulate in a single lifetime on your Honda. Even I can do a little math; how much have you spent on the vehicle's maintanence verses the milage you've gotten? Like other people have noted, don't scrimp on the service requirements. Stick with someone reputable, even if it has to be the dealer. Oh, and those "great deals" you hear about from the chain stores? They aren't in business to provide killer deals to the public. They are in business to make money, and anyone in the organization who doesn't understand that doesn't last long at that job. Upsell is the name of the game, as you might gather by recent lawsuits filed against Sears, Econo Lube and Tune, and others here in California. In other words, the shop who's telling you that a front brake job on anything will only cost you 50 dollars is not there to do you any favors. On the other hand, if you are firm against the upsell (at least without a second opinion), take the vehicle for oil changes at your oil change place where you can't even buy the oil and filter, as well as dispose of used oil, for what they'll change your oil for. But they aren't there to offer you a killer price on an oil change. They're there to upsell you and it's up to you to be an informed consumer.

Best,

Steve
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