Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 0
Between sessions of raking leaves and patching holes in the old barn, I'm doing some holiday weekend tweaking on a website where I sell a subscription to an email newsletter.

The subscription payment is handled by PayPal and currently is a monthly subscription - meaning the monthly subscription fee of $5 is automatically paid from the subscriber's PayPal account.

I'm considering changing this to a quarterly payment of $15.

Should I offer a subscriber the option of paying monthly, quarterly, or annually OR is that too many options that may overwhelm the subscriber? Should I just pick one term and offer it exclusively?

Would it make a difference about offering all three options if the longer term rates included a discount - or are three options still too many options to offer?


ShelbyBoy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
As a follow-up to the previous question, for an email newsletter intended for business-owner subscribers, should I offer the option of sending the business an invoice?

I'm having success with the newsletter so far without it, but I often wonder if there aren't some business owners who would rather pay by invoice. I have not received any requests for an invoice.

ShelbyBoy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<
Should I offer a subscriber the option of paying monthly, quarterly, or annually OR is that too many options that may overwhelm the subscriber? Should I just pick one term and offer it exclusively?

Would it make a difference about offering all three options if the longer term rates included a discount - or are three options still too many options to offer?
>>


The usual trade off is to offer a cheaper rate per copy for a longer suibscription. That being the case, why change your current practice if it is working well for you?


I would presume that there is a reason.



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
<<The usual trade off is to offer a cheaper rate per copy for a longer suibscription. That being the case, why change your current practice if it is working well for you? >>

Agreed.

My best advice would be to talk with customers, maybe even include a short survey in your next newsletter. Or, if there's a way to work this with PayPal, have an e-mail sent out to each subscriber after they pay their next bill. In the e-mail you list your survey questions after thanking them for their patronage.

Good luck,

Tim
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The usual trade off is to offer a cheaper rate per copy for a longer suibscription.

I'm tweaking that idea now.



That being the case, why change your current practice if it is working well for you?

Ever since I started I've had the thought in the back of my mind that some people might like to pay once quarterly or annually and then not see the charge again until the next quarter/year.

I have hesitated offering the new options in order to keep things as simple and "uncluttered" as possible. But I often wonder if it might be a good idea to offer the additional options anyway.

ShelbyBoy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Are we allowed to look at the website? Or at least know more about it and the email newsletter? This would make it easier to comment on your queries,

Lynn

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
<I'm having success with the newsletter so far without it, but I often wonder if there aren't some business owners who would rather pay by invoice.>

Probably most business owners would because it would delay payment at least by a few days if not more... Catch could be the difficulty of getting payment if an invoice is not paid. Unless the fees for your email newsletter are pretty steep it could cost you more to 'pursue' payment than what you would gain by pursuing it. My feelings here are that an email newsletter may be hugely useful but is also by its nature a rather ephemeral thing. You can't compensate for failure to pay by taking your email back!

Lynn
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
<<<I'm having success with the newsletter so far without it, but I often wonder if there aren't some business owners who would rather pay by invoice.>

Probably most business owners would because it would delay payment at least by a few days if not more... Catch could be the difficulty of getting payment if an invoice is not paid. Unless the fees for your email newsletter are pretty steep it could cost you more to 'pursue' payment than what you would gain by pursuing it. My feelings here are that an email newsletter may be hugely useful but is also by its nature a rather ephemeral thing. You can't compensate for failure to pay by taking your email back!

Lynn
>>


Since this is an internet publication, how about E-mailing them an invoice marked "paid"? That's probably useable as a tax record for a business deduction.




Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
<<Are we allowed to look at the website? Or at least know more about it and the email newsletter? This would make it easier to comment on your queries,

Lynn
>>


Heh, heh! Sure ---that'll be $5.00 please.



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Ever since I started I've had the thought in the back of my mind that some people might like to pay once quarterly or annually and then not see the charge again until the next quarter/year.

That's one plus. Another is selling a year's (or quarter's) worth of newsletters. If someone is on a monthly payment plan and decides to cancel, they're done that month. No more sales from them.

But if you get them to commit to a year's worth, they likely won't reconsider their purchase decision until it's time to renew. Even if they're not thrilled, odds are that they won't cancel and ask for a prorated refund. They'll just keep getting the newsletter until their subscription runs out. That gets you more revenue from that customer.

I'd say to skip the quarterly subscription and offer monthly and annual, with some kind of discount for the annual (maybe the equivalent of 2 months free?) Or make the annual price 12 times the monthly, but add 2 free issues to the end. I wouldn't offer too many choices, as the administrative hassles go up with the number of options you offer.

--Peter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Since this is an internet publication, how about E-mailing them an invoice marked "paid"? That's probably useable as a tax record for a business deduction.


They get one automatically from PayPal.

I was thinking they might want to receive an invoice and then pay by check via snail mail.

ShelbyBoy




Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I'd say to skip the quarterly subscription and offer monthly and annual, with some kind of discount for the annual (maybe the equivalent of 2 months free?) Or make the annual price 12 times the monthly, but add 2 free issues to the end.

Thanks, that's a good possibility.



I wouldn't offer too many choices, as the administrative hassles go up with the number of options you offer.

Actually, with PayPal's automation and my subscriber management software, the hassle is minimal.


ShelbyBoy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
As the saying goes, "If it works, don't fix it."
Also, in my experience it's easier to keep track of a monthly automatic payment than one done quarterly or yearly.

Martha B.
Denver CO
Print the post Back To Top