No. of Recommendations: 39
A friend sent this to me and I thought our community might be interested/amused.

=========================================================
We have all been to those meetings where someone wants 
more than 100%.  Well, here's how you can achieve 103%.

First, here's a little math that might prove helpful.

Begin by noting the following.

IF:
  A = 1
  B = 2
  C = 3
  D = 4
  E = 5
  F = 6
  G = 7
  H = 8
  I = 9
  J = 10
  K = 11
   :
   :
   :
  X = 24
  Y = 25
  Z = 26

Then:
  H A R D W O R K
  8+1+18+4+23+15+18+11 = Only 98%

Similarly,
  K N O W L E D G E
  11+14+15+23+12+5+4+7+5 = Only 96%

  But interesting (and as you'd expect),
  A T T I T U D E
1+20+20+9+20+21+4+5 = 100% ... This is how you achieve 100% in LIFE.

But even more important to note is

  B U L L S H I T
2+21+12+12+19+8+9+20 = 103%

Maybe this is what all those high-priced consultant and 
motivational speakers really mean when they want to exceed 100%!

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
LOL. Thanks for the example, Bill. I may use it, (minus the bullshit,) for my 8th grade math class that has a particularly bad attitude about anything that stretches their brains.

InParadise,
Who is particularly frustrated with bright kids who refuse to work, and are reaping the respective grades that reflect their negative attitudes.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
LOL. Thanks for the example, Bill. I may use it, (minus the bullshit,) for my 8th grade math class that has a particularly bad attitude about anything that stretches their brains.

InParadise,
Who is particularly frustrated with bright kids who refuse to work, and are reaping the respective grades that reflect their negative attitudes.


I taught remedial college math for a few years. Two things I tried to do to keep the students interested was to find logic and math puzzles for students to work on and to get the brighter students to explain things to those who were further behind. I don't know how much flexibility you have in terms of how your class is structured, but something like this might work.

Hope this helps,

Amphian
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
The person who made this up deserves the Nobel Prize for intercst's 3 for 1 Rule!!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 32
InParadise wrote:

...particularly frustrated with bright kids who refuse to work, and are reaping the respective grades that reflect their negative attitudes.

Amphian wrote:

...and to get the brighter students to explain things to those who were further behind.

I just wanted to point out that it is instructors with these kinds of attitudes who force bright students to really hate the educational system.

All those wonderful standardized tests we took in grammar school placed me in the 99th percentile across the boards year after year. They put me in the "Gifted and Talented" program and gave me all kinds of extra goodies to attend - college courses, take the SAT's in 7th grade, workshops, etc.

These things were all great, but life is the regular classroom was pure misery. Not only was I expected to go as slow as the lesson plans provided, but if I was ahead, the teachers actually expected me to help them do their job by assisting other students. They were happy to have me do their work, but no sign of splitting that paycheck. You want me to tutor somebody? Pay me.

I hoped things would get better in high school, because the frustration level was unbearable. Well, they didn't get any better. My AP Biology course freshman year was torture. I had taken a college level marine biology course in the 8th grade that was far more comprehensive than high school biology. I certainly received no credit for it, and I had no desire to dissect earthworms and frogs when I had already done the same to a dog shark.

There were bright spots, of course. My sophomore year computer programming teacher realized that I was way ahead of the curve in his class, so he allowed me to spend my class time proof reading and debugging the program he was writing for the masters course he was taking at night. I think it was my only A+ that year, and only did one actual class assignment - what should have been the final one in the first week.

Thank God for the drama club and classes like video production and film study. At least they didn't force me to interrupt my plan of reading all of Heinlein's and Rand's novels with a side trip to analyze "The Crucible" (I've always hated Arthur Miller's work).

Once I got to junior year of high school, I ditched the academic track altogether. It was far too boring. I dropped to four regular classes per day and took a co-operative education class. I went to work in the afternoons to complete enough credits to graduate high school. DECA (Distributive Education Clubs of America) made my last two years of high school bearable.

Of course my parents insisted that I take the SAT's (again) in high school. To appease them, I took them once. The high school principal was none too pleased to be handing me an Academic Excellence Award for having the second highest scores in my graduating class in the same semester in which I flunked English Lit. I went through four years of high school hardly ever completing a single piece of homework becuase doing so served no purpose for me, only for the teachers.

Sometimes the destination is far more important than the journey, especially when you have already made the journey before.

I know it's not easy for teachers to deal with the variety of students they find in their classes, and it must be difficult to deal with a student who could pass the final exam on the first day of class, but these kids need special treatment. Challenge them or leave them alone. Please don't confuse frustration and boredom with an attitude problem. And don't ask them to help do your job. It's insulting.

Jim
Wishing they had CLEP exams for all levels of education
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
Is anyone else here reminded of that priceless scene in "This Is Spinal Tap," where the band member is explaining why he taped an "11" onto his stereo volume control?

<British accent>
"See, I turn the volume up to 10, like this, but then if I want just a little bit more, I go up to 11."
</British accent>

I always think of that scene when people yapper on about giving "110%." And they wonder why I start to giggle!

bookgrrrl
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
I know it's not easy for teachers to deal with the variety of students they find in their classes, and it must be difficult to deal with a student who could pass the final exam on the first day of class, but these kids need special treatment. Challenge them or leave them alone.

Please re-read my post. I was teaching remedial math in college. In other words, these were kids who did not know 8th grade algebra by their freshman year of college, not bored 8th graders who knew it already.

I can agree with wishing kids could CLEP out of any level of school. I was basically bored at school from day one. I passed all the standardized tests at 12th grade-level before I got to junior high, but there was no "Gifted and Talented" program in my area, so I had to make due.

Please don't confuse frustration and boredom with an attitude problem.

I guess the difference between your and my experience was attitude. I knew I was stuck in high school for a couple of years, so I determined to make the best of it. The stuff wasn't challenging, so I would knock off my homework and then study the stuff I was interested in learning. Some classes were a pain, but it's not like they required a lot of effort to learn. I figured it was good training for the work world, where you have to do what you're told whether or not it is interesting every day.

And don't ask them to help do your job. It's insulting.

You would be surprised to see how happy it makes some remedial students to finally understand something well enough to be able to explain it to someone else. I don't see anything wrong with asking for volunteers. Those who don't want to do it simply don't volunteer.

Amphian
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
How to get 127%...

INTEGRITY

... check my math, will ya?

John
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
How to get 136%

KISSING ASS

Kevin
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
bookgrrrl wrote:
Is anyone else here reminded of that priceless scene in "This Is Spinal Tap," where the band member is explaining why he taped an
"11" onto his stereo volume control?

<British accent>
"See, I turn the volume up to 10, like this, but then if I want just a little bit more, I go up to 11."
</British accent>

I always think of that scene when people yapper on about giving "110%." And they wonder why I start to giggle!

bookgrrrl



...you sure did set me a'grinnin-

(to continue the scene):"But why not just make 10 one louder?"

...(pause) "this one goes to 11".


:-) I think that will make me smile for the rest of the day-
meg
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
But even more important to note is

B U L L S H I T
2+21+12+12+19+8+9+20 = 103%

Maybe this is what all those high-priced consultant and
motivational speakers really mean when they want to exceed 100%!


Every Laboratory Animal Facility in the United States has what is called a "Animal Care and Concerns Committee." Because I was the manager of the animal facility I was required to be on that committee. It met every other Friday afternoon after lunch. On this committee were several high paid Veterinarians. When a "protocol" was submitted it had to be "reviewed" which meant spending many hours talking about how the animals were going to be used, what procedures would be performed on them, if the research was redundant, etc. Eventually every "protocol" was ok'ed after we sat there going over each one in tedious detail. The problem was that I was a mid-level manager who had mountains of work, especially because it was friday and I had to make sure the animals were going to be well cared for over the weekend. I dreaded those meetings because it meant that I had to work over to get done all the work that I need to get done, and hence I can see how "103%" is so appropriate for "bull$h!t. - Art
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 7
InParadise wrote:

...particularly frustrated with bright kids who refuse to work, and are reaping the respective grades that reflect their negative attitudes.

...
I just wanted to point out that it is instructors with these kinds of attitudes who force bright students to really hate the educational system.


Jim,

In this case I'm afraid you don't know what you are talking about. I have started working at a private college prep school this year that has seen a significant share of turnover of faculty in the previous years. The result of this has been a lowering of standards, and these students, who for the most part are all pretty bright since their parents are paying through the nose for their education, or they've obtained merit scholarships, have not had to work for their A's for years. Between the fact that they : 1) now have a hard nosed, (or insert other less polite terms here,) teacher who is not concerned about being invited back next year, (the school will be thrilled if I just complete the school year without quitting,) who insists that they actually spend a few moments thinking about math rather than just applying rules to problems, and 2) are now reaching more complicated areas of math which involve multiple application of rules rather than the old learn and forget til next year approach, these kids are not used to being challenged and they just plain old don't like it. They miss their free ride.

I too had it extremely easy during school, and hated the easy courses. The easier the course, the worse the grade on my part. The harder, the better. These kids have got to learn to be challenged, and to face a challenge. How to convince them to give a damn and try is my challenge. So far, a few are responding to getting D's and F's, and at mid-trimester are finally coming for the extra help they need. Most are still believing that I too will soon go away, as have most of their previous teachers. It is called a game of chicken, of control. I'm fortunate that I'm financially stable enough to not care if I get handed a pink slip, and the school is desperate enough not to give me one.

FWIW,

InParadise,
A teacher with standards.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 7
And don't ask them to help do your job. It's insulting.


Yes, it's much better to let them sit there and shoot paper wads and spit balls. And also turning around and making wisecracks to other students is ever popular too. Until you've been a teacher and had to entertain a classroom of students you can't imagine how challenging it is. It's not a one time thing either, it's every day, day in and day out. Of course I wasn't in the gifted, honors, or AP program so maybe it's easier for geniuses. - Art
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 10
How to get 127%...

INTEGRITY

... check my math, will ya?

John


You want to know how to succeed? PERSISTENCE! And I don't know how many percent it is but I know that is how my wife got her PhD and I know people who were not geniuses that are very successful. And, I have several nephews and nieces who were in honors and the gifted program that dropped out of college because they were incredibly lazy.
I think persistence and hard work are more important than genius. - Art
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
art---You want to know how to succeed? PERSISTENCE! And I don't know how many percent it is but I know that is how my wife got her PhD and I know people who were not geniuses that are very successful. And, I have several nephews and nieces who were in honors and the gifted program that dropped out of college because they were incredibly lazy.
I think persistence and hard work are more important than genius.


rocker---.....how about "attitude"....i just had a great conversation with a friend of mine that is the general manager of a home depot store....he told me he would rather hiring someone with a great attitude and a smiling face who would be pleasant toward serving customers than to have someone with superior technical knowledge who doesn't treat the customers with the service that is required!!!....technical knowledge can be taught a lot easier than "a great attitude with a smiling face"......i have personally seen that over the year i "served the master!"
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
I know it's not easy for teachers to deal with the variety of students they find in their classes, and it must be difficult to deal with a student who could pass the final exam on the first day of class, but these kids need special treatment. Challenge them or leave them alone. Please don't confuse frustration and boredom with an attitude problem. And don't ask them to help do your job. It's insulting.

Amen.

I was in the same boat as you, but I took a different journey, the "let's make some money off of this bad situation" journey.

The public school I was attended spent all the gifted program money on the special ed students (who already had funding ten times over what the gifted students had), so there was literally nothing I could do in school, besides cause trouble and tutor my friends sans paycheck. I waited from 5th grade to sophmore year for the funding to be appropriately allocated, still nothing. So I left.

I found a relatively cheap parochial school that would let me take my last two years of school concurrently. I graduated when I was 16, with good grades and high test scores. I ended up winning a $60,000 scholarship to college (which I never would have gotten entered for if I'd stayed at that public school).

I probably would be disturbingly far from early retirement now if it hadn't been for that scholarship. It's a damn good thing I left.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
rocker---.....how about "attitude"....i just had a great conversation with a friend of mine that is the general manager of a home depot store....he told me he would rather hiring someone with a great attitude and a smiling face who would be pleasant toward serving customers than to have someone with superior technical knowledge who doesn't treat the customers with the service that is required!!!....technical knowledge can be taught a lot easier than "a great attitude with a smiling face"......i have personally seen that over the year i "served the master!"


I read somewhere the hardest part of any job is learning to get along with people. They say you can teach anyone just about anything but the hardest thing to teach someone is how to get along with other people.
- Art
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
COOL! to say the least
Print the post Back To Top