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So what's going to happen a few months down the line, when all the states have peaked and we're on the other side of the curve, on the downside? All of sudden we're all going to come out of our hidey-holes, back to work and play? Who needs social distancing?

And everyone who made it through w/o being infected previously has a good chance of being infected this time around. And so, what, we do it all again?
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We are going to kind of keep this "stay at home" thing going until there is a vaccine. Or maybe until there is evidence of a reliable drug they will treat it with. They said maybe a year for a vaccine, which is a bit much for anybody to stay at home. But we are retired, so are at home much of the time and don't have a job to go to and didn't lose a job either. We might venture out a little more than now, but not much. We will probably delay our travel plans for months or maybe a year also. Unless for some reason, people just stop getting the virus -- which doesn't seem likely. I just can't see us getting on an airplane for the foreseeable future. Sure would like a nice vacation though.

I suspect once we "flatten the curve" and the states allow us to venture out again, there will be a spike again. Then we might all hunker down for a bit, for the second time. Then who knows.

Footsox
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White-collar workers are learning how to do their jobs from home, if they didn't know already. Drs and patients are learning to use telemedicine. People who didn't like the phone or texting or FaceTime are getting acclimated. It's harder for some than others.

My grandson (9), a mild extrovert, misses his many activities, especially orchestra, his friends, playgrounds, even being in school, but has adjusted. He understands and can explain quite articulately why it's important to keep social distance and his part in keeping himself, his family, and his city safe. But my granddaughter (almost 7) is an off-the-chart extrovert and people-person and is having a much harder time. She's tired of FaceTime, texting, and Google Classroom. DD told me that she does her schoolwork fine, but misses the teacher's in-person praise. (Oh noes--a trumpie in the making?!)
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Been buying 5 gallon buckets of different kind of grains, beans, and rice. Lake w fish, dug a well, and just bought some chickens at the end of last year. Hope I never have to use these items, but in case I do, we are probably in a depression, Todd
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Yep. Just not quite as bad. From what I've read pandemics tend to go in waves; first wave gets flattened, people venture back out and second wave hits but not as bad; maybe a 3rd or 4th wave each successively less horrendous as herd immunity builds up. The social distancing is all about trying to have a lot of small waves over time so no one wave overwhelms the health system etc resulting in deaths that could have been avoided with proper medical attention. I'm such a coward I intend to stay hunkered down until a vaccine is available. It's not particularly a problem for me as I tend to be an introvert, am retired and am in to the whole 'living off the land' gestalt anyway.
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China is testing the rebound waters, Italy will probably test them next.
With no known cure, it's likely almost everyone will eventually get it.
The longer it takes the more experienced and less overloaded the hospital staff is.
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This is true. Actual scientists say eventually at least 75% of us will get it. Herd immunity kicks in around 80-90%. Eventually enough of us will get the antibodies to make it rare again. They’re already using antibodies from cured people to help the ill.

The key is for us all to not get it at the same time and people who can’t get a hospital bed dying on the floor of the emergency room like those pictures leaked out from China.
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They’re already using antibodies from cured people to help the ill.

AFAIK this is in clinical trials so far. To give plasma, someone needs to have had a positive test and no symptoms for 14 days. This also goes back to the availability of testing. Personally, I think people recover from the disease - I wouldn't call them "cured."
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