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You know, I dont need a confirmation email everytime I log on. Its redundant. Nobody else has my password. But, I DO want a confirmation email when I mail in a deposit. But they dont do that.

Bassakwards if you ask me !
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You know, I dont need a confirmation email everytime I log on. Its redundant. Nobody else has my password. But, I DO want a confirmation email when I mail in a deposit. But they dont do that.

Bassakwards if you ask me !


I think they have it right. The purpose of the confirmation is to prevent unauthorized activity, not to give you a log of your own actions. If someone steals, guesses or otherwise fakes your password, you will be notified of it as soon as you get the email resulting from the perpetrator's login to your account. On the other hand, one probably does not care if there are unauthorized deposits to one's account; one might even welcome such transactions.
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Foobar73

I couldn't have said it better.

Mark W. Jaindl
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The emails don't bother me a bit. They're only a quick notification,
and are easily deleted...

Mark,
I see you've changed the "sign off" process, to actually log you
off the first time you click it. Nice!!

-upatnite2
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What are the realistic chances of someone "guessing" someone elses password ? Very,very remote.

And their emailing thousands of customers what is essentially "spam" because of a remote chance a one in a million hacker gets though and billpays himself someones elses money.

At the same time, I dont get emails for what IS important to me..when my mail in deposits get credited.

Somehow, ING doesnt email me everytime I log in.
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What are the realistic chances of someone "guessing" someone elses password ? Very,very remote.

Password guessing is surprisingly effective, and well-documented as such. The problems stems from many people using familiar names (such as family members, or pets), words, birthdates, etc. for their passwords. This narrows down the search space considerably.

I also noted password theft and fraud as potential attacks. While not as direct as outright guessing, these can be even more powerful attack techniques that generally cannot be circumvented with some of the methods normally used to prevent guessing. Notification of account usage, on the other hand, effectively acts as another layer of defense which can work to detect such problems.

And their emailing thousands of customers what is essentially "spam" because of a remote chance a one in a million hacker gets though and billpays himself someones elses money.

At the same time, I dont get emails for what IS important to me..when my mail in deposits get credited.


In case my previous reply wasn't clear, this is not a convenience feature for you. This is a security feature. Security is, generally, the antithesis of convenience: making something more secure usually means making it less convenient, less comfortable and more intrusive.

Adding deposit notification might be a worthwhile idea. Removing account usage notification is not. Extra alertness is worth the price of a few additional emails.
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More likely, someone will snoop your password over your shoulder, find where you wrote it down, or install keystroke logging software on your computer.

PC Banker is just covering its own butt. If there is an unauthorized access to the account you will be notified about it. Less opportunity to sue them.

I suspect the only way they'd remove the notification is if you signed away your right to sue them.
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upatnite2

You commented:

"I see you've changed the "sign off" process, to actually log you
off the first time you click it. Nice!!"

My response:

This was a good idea and we appreciate all of you who brought it to our attention.

Thanks

Mark
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