No. of Recommendations: 10
People in poor health don't feel good enough to walk.
The people who feel good enough to walk, and who are capable of walking fast...are in good health.

How could it be a surprise that the first group, on average, will die sooner than the second group. It's not the walking that does it.


Ah, but having common sense doesn't get research grant funding.

Didn't read the article in detail, but I suppose if they measured me walking through Athletes' Village on my way to the start line last Monday, it would say that this 62 year old was going to live a long time. But if they measured me walking back to my hotel after I crossed the finish line and got the mylar poncho, it would say I'm gonna die Real Soon Now.
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What it means is: If you are destined to live that long therefore you can likely walk at the faster speeds.
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FCorelli writes,

What it means is: If you are destined to live that long therefore you can likely walk at the faster speeds.

</snip>

I don't think that's destiny. If you do something to improve your physical fitness level, it will likely increase your longevity. That chart just gives you an idea of the likely extent of the improvement.

intercst
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If you do something to improve your physical fitness level, it will likely increase your longevity. That chart just gives you an idea of the likely extent of the improvement.

I think there's probably a bit of reversing cause and effect here.

People in poor health don't feel good enough to walk.
The people who feel good enough to walk, and who are capable of walking fast...are in good health.

How could it be a surprise that the first group, on average, will die sooner than the second group. It's not the walking that does it.
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No. of Recommendations: 10
People in poor health don't feel good enough to walk.
The people who feel good enough to walk, and who are capable of walking fast...are in good health.

How could it be a surprise that the first group, on average, will die sooner than the second group. It's not the walking that does it.


Ah, but having common sense doesn't get research grant funding.

Didn't read the article in detail, but I suppose if they measured me walking through Athletes' Village on my way to the start line last Monday, it would say that this 62 year old was going to live a long time. But if they measured me walking back to my hotel after I crossed the finish line and got the mylar poncho, it would say I'm gonna die Real Soon Now.
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No. of Recommendations: 15
intercst,

You wrote, The faster you walk, the longer you're likely to live.

So those slow pokes dawdling in the store aisles aren't just aggravating my back and leg pain, they're shortening my left expectancy. Great. :-(

- Joel
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the faster walking seniors are just able to out walk the grim reaper
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the faster walking seniors are just able to out walk the grim reaper

Your post is disgusting and should be removed from the board.

And the Four people that recommended the post-- You all should be ashamed of yourselves.

b&w
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"the faster walking seniors are just able to out walk the grim reaper "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You'd figure direction might have an impact.
Walking faster toward a train on the tracks might be a
somewhat less long-lived approach compared to tottering the
opposite direction.

Howie52
Knowing when to walk, when to run, and when to stop are
critical lessons learned.
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No. of Recommendations: 25
the faster walking seniors are just able to out walk the grim reaper

Your post is disgusting and should be removed from the board.

And the Four people that recommended the post-- You all should be ashamed of yourselves.

b&w


geez...no sense of humor


people who know me understand i sometimes go on goat hunts...i wasn't hunting goats this time

but it looks like i found one just the same...
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"geez...no sense of humor"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Actually, I thought they might be trying to make a humorous aside.

As there is not other obvious reasons for the comment.

Howie52
Known to be a warped individual - however, if one walks
at warp speed, perhaps one might be younger tomorrow.
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Reminds me of a George Michael song

Help me before you go go :). Or something like that.
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The faster walking seniors are just able to out walk the grim reaper
===============================
Your post is disgusting and should be removed from the board.
And the Four people that recommended the post-- You all should be ashamed of yourselves.
b&w

==============================
I don't see anything disgusting. Besides being amusing, there's a lot of truth to it.
And it's now up to 13 recs, at last count, including me.

Bill -not ashamed.
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<<Reminds me of a George Michael song

Help me before you go go :). Or something like that.>>

Wake me up before you go go --- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIgZ7gMze7A

I always thought it was wake me up before you go girl...


Lisa
in MA
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And it's now up to 13 recs, at last count, including me.

Me, too. I hadn't given it a rec when I first read it since it only seemed moderately funny to me, but because of the silly offense taken, I went back and gave it (and the follow up) a rec!

Pete
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I don't see anything disgusting. Besides being amusing, there's a lot of truth to it.
And it's now up to 13 recs, at last count, including me.


It’s not only “not disgusting”, it’s moderately humorous. Anyone who takes offense should recalibrate their life and expectations from a message board.

Seriously.

(Now up to 26 recs. Keep it alive! (Oh, I’m sorry, is that offensive?)
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It’s not only “not disgusting”, it’s moderately humorous. Anyone who takes offense should recalibrate their life and expectations from a message board.

A sense of humor has been shown to lead to longer life and is no doubt a bigger measure of expected survival than gait speed. Those without a sense of humor just feel as though they live a lot longer than they had hoped.

IP
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Having observed the overall health declines of both of my grandmothers after they lost the ability to walk, with that subsequent decline seeming to be the primary cause of their deaths, I would say this study has tons of merit.

My maternal grandfather is still living at 87 and in pretty good health other than some back pain that was largely a result of caring for my grandmother between about 2011 and early in 2017 when she moved to an assisted living facility. He did have a heart valve replaced at 85, which the doctor said should serve him well until he's 100 or so. I postulate that her loss of mobility contributed greatly to her onset of dementia and likely strokes. My paternal grandmother largely became immobile following my grandfather's lung cancer diagnosis which lead to his death (he seemed to be in really great health for an 83 or 84 year old up until the lung cancer, and even still worked with my dad). I postulate that her increasing immobility was a major contributor to decreasing blood flow to her brain (probably some strokes involved there too) and declining ability to speak and such. Losing my grandpa probably took away a lot of her desire to maintain mobility as well.

Thus out of 4 grandparents, one is still very lively and a great story-teller, one ended up with lung cancer that had spread to his liver/stomach prior to being diagnosed, and two declined in large part due to loss of mobility (from what I observed).

I have thought about this a fair amount, as I have tried to estimate my own life expectancy and thus retirement needs and such. I am thinking I stand a pretty fair chance of reaching 95+ barring a car accident or some such.......so that means I may be around until 2079 or so.

-volfan84
about to go walk a few flights of stairs for some midday exercise
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IP says:"A sense of humor ...snip...is no doubt a bigger measure of expected survival than gait speed."

I disagree 🙂.

I think gait speed, as used in the OP article, is positively correlated with smoothly operating, painfree joints.

Gait speed is an INDICATOR of potential problems with the various organs and organ systems in the body.

One person close to me, had slow gait speed due to COPD and chronic emphysema.
Another, due to kidney failure.

I know quite a few folk with muscle OR tendon OR connective tissue malfunctions, who don't walk too good. Think fibromyalgia, chronic myofascial pain, MS, MD, ruptured/herniated/bulging disc, loss of menisci in the knee, damaged ligaments around the knee, etc.

Bone health issues such as bone-on-bone joints, bone spurs, calcified joints, improperly aligned bones, etc

Nerve issues such as sciatica, diabetic neuropathy, etc manifesting as pain which directly affects gait speed. (Don't forget that diabetes means the tissues of the leg and lower leg are not getting enough nutrients for proper functions either). How about nonpainful nerve malfunctions.

Balance issues whether neural due to inner ear problems, poorly functioning sensory nerve endings in feet, ankles, knees, hips, lower back, or any of the muscles, tendons, and other connective tissue, contribute to gait speed.

Improperly functioning muscles, joints, bones, etc implies that other (vital?) organs and organ systems are not free jctioning properly.

Stiffness and health conditions of muscles, tendons, connective tissues, and bone all affect the flexibility, smoothness, and ease of movement of joints.

I'm not surprised that study found a positive correlation between gait speed and death.

I suspect the correlation was even stronger prior to 1900.

🙂
ralph
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I postulate that her loss of mobility contributed greatly to her onset of dementia and likely strokes.

Very possible if she suffered from vascular dementia rather than Alzheimers. But not sure what comes first in that case. Mom and Dad walked a brisk 4 miles a day before her stroke, which sidelined both of them. With the stroke she went from looking 20 years younger than her age to considerably older. Post menopause she had chronic high blood pressure that was hard to control without turning her into a zombie and the cause of which they never determined. Ditto for her mom. Loss of mobility was caused by stroke, though that was not what killed her over a decade later. She was unable to recover from a hip fracture due to osteoporosis.

My paternal grandmother largely became immobile following my grandfather's lung cancer diagnosis which lead to his death (he seemed to be in really great health for an 83 or 84 year old up until the lung cancer, and even still worked with my dad). I postulate that her increasing immobility was a major contributor to decreasing blood flow to her brain (probably some strokes involved there too) and declining ability to speak and such. Losing my grandpa probably took away a lot of her desire to maintain mobility as well.

Depression sounds like the root cause of her decreased will to move. Her lack of mobility was a symptom rather than a cause, however. Dad's will to live evaporated when Mom died. It's the Catholic way to kill yourself and still get into heaven. Life is a terminal condition you can only maintain, not control.

Yes, for all the humor on this thread it is best to realize that it has been documented that those who exercise live longer. Happily this exercise can be done in multiple small not so dramatic bursts to be beneficial. In terms of this board consider investing in movement to have a positive impact on your potential quantity and quality of life. But so is humor.

IP,
who would have never survived her parents prolonged downward trajectory had it not been for the ability to see the twisted humor in it all
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Having observed the overall health declines of both of my grandmothers after they lost the ability to walk, with that subsequent decline seeming to be the primary cause of their deaths, I would say this study has tons of merit.

More likely you have cause and effect reversed. Their health didn't decline because they stopped walking, they stopped walking BECAUSE their health had declined.
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More likely you have cause and effect reversed. Their health didn't decline because they stopped walking, they stopped walking BECAUSE their health had declined.

I certainly see your point, but I postulate that brain health is significantly impacted by overall cardiovascular health (and thus getting good blood flow to your brain).

This postulation is also informed by my own personal observations of coming up with far more seemingly creative ideas following vigorous cardiovascular exercise than when I have not been engaging in regular vigorous cardio.

There is certainly a chicken/egg conundrum at play when looking at losing mobility and the effect of that on overall health.......my point is mostly in regards to brain functionality.
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Walk or run, it makes no difference. We're all going to die. Our time here on earth is but an infinitesimal fraction of what lies beyond. Chaw on that.

Have a great day!
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rayvt: "More likely you have cause and effect reversed. Their health didn't decline because they stopped walking, they stopped walking BECAUSE their health had declined."

On the one hand, there is pretty good evidence that walking improves health. For example:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/walking-yo...

On the other hand, you (meaning all of us) eventually reach a point where extreme old age wins and we are forced to give up walking because our health has declined.

I walk a lot at the age of 62 because I want to maximize my odds of living a healthy life until I am 90 or so - like my parents and grandparents ahead of me.

I also walk a lot because I enjoy it.
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I also walk a lot because I enjoy it.
~~~~~~~~~~~~

I used to cross country ski, but I had to give it up because it was taking too long to go that far :-)
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I walk a lot at the age of 62 because I want to maximize my odds of living a healthy life until I am 90 or so - like my parents and grandparents ahead of me.

I also walk a lot because I enjoy it.


I walk a lot at 61 because my Apple Watch runs my life. :)

-IGU-
(getting close to 1000 consecutive days of closing all my activity rings!)
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I walk a lot at 61 because my Apple Watch runs my life. :)

How sad. Here in Soviet Union, we run Watch. And Watch tells us the time is whatever we tell it to say, if it knows what is good for it.
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Didn't read the article in detail, but I suppose if they measured me walking through Athletes' Village on my way to the start line last Monday, it would say that this 62 year old was going to live a long time. But if they measured me walking back to my hotel after I crossed the finish line and got the mylar poncho, it would say I'm gonna die Real Soon Now.

Patzer


Sounds like you ran the Boston Marathon. Of all the marathons I ever ran, Boston was the most physically demanding due to the down hill course segments. The next day I'd be walking down the subway stairs backwards.

A local woman who ran Boston said that the conditions were the worst she'd ever faced for a marathon and were made worse by the fact she had to stand in ankle deep mud in the Athlete's Village for two hours prior to starting the marathon. You runners would have been better off had it been below freezing and snowing.

I watched the Boston finish line runners on-line and saw one guy come across the finish line wearing nothing on his upper body! When I ran Boston back in the 1980s the fields were smaller (4 to 5 thousand runners) and we runners were able to shelter inside the Hopkinton High School before the start so we avoided any mud.
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Of all the marathons I ever ran, Boston was the most physically demanding due to the down hill course segments. The next day I'd be walking down the subway stairs backwards.

That was me at age 60. Two years later, I've learned to train downhill running before Boston. This year, I was able to go down short flights of stairs three hours later. Hauled my luggage down a short set of stairs changing T lines the next day; for long flights, I took the elevator.

A local woman who ran Boston said that the conditions were the worst she'd ever faced for a marathon and were made worse by the fact she had to stand in ankle deep mud in the Athlete's Village for two hours prior to starting the marathon. You runners would have been better off had it been below freezing and snowing.

I'd rather deal with snow in the air, but water on the ground. And I was smart/lucky; I bought a VIP package that included a private bus I could stay on until my wave left. Dealt with the mud in Athletes' Village only long enough to get through on my way to the start line.

Sometimes, the way to live longer is to admit you're not Superman and take what advantages you can with the logistics.

Disclosure: Average gait speed for 26.2 miles, 7:58 per mile (~7.5 mph). Then really, really slow till I got back to the hotel and had a hot shower.
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Sometimes, the way to live longer is to admit you're not Superman and take what advantages you can with the logistics.

Disclosure: Average gait speed for 26.2 miles, 7:58 per mile (~7.5 mph).


Under 8m/m...as far as I'm concerned, you ARE superman.
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I suppose if they measured me walking through Athletes' Village on my way to the start line last Monday, it would say that this 62 year old was going to live a long time. But if they measured me walking back to my hotel after I crossed the finish line and got the mylar poncho, it would say I'm gonna die Real Soon Now.

I have the same issues after doing Spartan Beast races. An obstacle course race that usually comes in between 14-15 miles. At the start line I look great, will live forever. By the time I'm done I need help taking off my clothes/equipment to get into the shower, life expectancy less than 24 hours.

JLC
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