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What is the most economical way to prevent fleas in animals? I have been paying 16.00 a month for advantage for each animal( I have two) there must be a cheaper way.


And what are others feeding their dogs and cats that don't cost so much. Thanks.

Fool Kath
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What is the most economical way to prevent fleas in animals? I have been paying 16.00 a month for advantage for each animal( I have two) there must be a cheaper way.


I've been bathing my kitty every two weeks and spraying him down with Adams flea spray. However, I'll need to do something stronger, I think.

He recently got in a cat fight and got an abcess close to his eye. Had to take him to the vet for surgery yesterday. What a mess! (and expensive)

--Chooey
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I've been bathing my kitty every two weeks and spraying him down with Adams flea spray. However, I'll need to do something stronger, I think.



Let me know what you find to help rid him of fleas. I hope he goes through surgery ok.
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<<What is the most economical way to prevent fleas in animals? I have been paying 16.00 a month for advantage for each animal( I have two) there must be a cheaper way.
>>


I think you need a systemic approach to minimizing flea problems. I'd do some internet research on fleas and the environments they need sto flourish, and then attack several of those risk factors.

For example, fleas tend to thrive in old piles of wood. If you have such wood around your property, consider getting rid of it. Flea powders may be a way to treat your animals more often at low cost. Massage some flea powder into their coats from time to time.

Washing dog bedding out fairly frequently may help to avoid infestations. And putting an easily washed mat where your dogs like to sleep or lie may make it easier to treat that spot than if just carpet (hard to clean) is there.

So I'd do the research, look for the risk factors that apply to your situation, and treat as many of them as you find convenient.


Seattle Pioneer
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I have been paying 16.00 a month for advantage for each animal( I have two) there must be a cheaper way.

My response must be filtered through your eyes, since so much is dependent upon what environment your pets are exposed to.

I live in NYC, and my dog is only walked on 'groomed' (cut weekly) grass. Advantage works for 3 months on fleas, but only 1 month for ticks. Since I never take my dog anywhere that ticks are, I usually only use the advantage every 3 mos, or every other month. I skip Jan and Feb entirely unless it is a very warm winter.

Just recently I told my vet I was doing this. He saw nothing wrong with it except that he suggested I use it every month only in the spring.

I saw from your profile that you are in NY, but I don't know what environment your pets are subject to. I once had a dog pick up a tick at a little league game on Long Island, where the grass around the side of the field was a little long.

In short, if they're indoor pets, or only exposed to well-manicured lawns, you could almost certainly get away with usage every other month, but if even just one is allowed to roam outside at will, once a month is probably mandatory for both.

Having lived in Florida I found that flea collars, powders, sprays or the less expensive 'pet shop' treatments are totally ineffective.

And what are others feeding their dogs and cats that don't cost so much. Thanks.

I never feed my dog canned food because it is more expensive and completely unnecessary. A good dry food like Iams or Eukanuba have just about all the nutrition any pet needs. I stay away from the 'grocery store' brands like Purina, etc., because they are just not as good (I've been told by both vets and pro trainers and breeders). I have also tried pricier foods like Science Diet and other 'organic' brands and noticed absolutely no difference in my dog's health.

My dog has been prone to intestinal problems, so I give her a heaping tablespoon of plain yogurt mixed with her dry Eukanuba at the suggestion of my vet--that's all she gets (except for plain old biscuits as treats :-).

2old


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Let me know what you find to help rid him of fleas. I hope he goes through surgery ok.



Thanks, foolkath. so far, so good. I think we'll have his stiches removed Wednesday.

--Chooey
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We use Frontline for protection against fleas and ticks. This product costs us about $6.50 per month. We buy the product in France at this price but it should be about the same price in the US.

Frontline is a good product. We've protected the dogs and the cat for ten years.

Blackduff
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We have virtually gotten rid of our fleas. First of all, get rid of your wall to wall carpets. Flea larvae live in soft fuzzy stuff that your pets sleep on. Wash that stuff frequently. We have used a product called Siphotrol (sp?). It is combination of a fast acting, quick to break down poison combined with a substance that lingers (and is not toxic to anything but fleas) that keeps the fleas from maturing. We are loathe to use poisons but this product only has to be used once or twice and your home will really be nearly flea free. Fleas are not just on your pet. They live in your carpet as juveniles. Occasionally our pets will get a flea from a neighbor dog. We may use Advantage then as a one time thing. I cannot stress cleanliness of your floors enough. It's worth it.
Good luck, Edy
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This is a late reply, but I also recommend Frontline. Its about $7/month.
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Check out a product called Biospot. I have a 100 pound newf and a 3 month pack runs about $10. If you have smaller dogs you'll get by for less.
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