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I think what they mean is where to Retire Well on Less.

The 10 Best Places to Retire on Social Security Alone (according to US News & World Report):

http://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/2014/10/14...

I would happily retire to Albuquerque. Although I'm not familiar with downtown Jacksonville, I've camped nearby and the beach is nice--and there's a branch of the Mayo Clinic.
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I live in metro Phoenix area. If we had to, we could defintely retire on SS alone. Cost of living is comparable to Albuquerque and Tucson --only there is a lot more to do here. And there is large airport which translates into lower cost flights.

But for some reason, I never see Phoenix on these lists....
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Everyone has to decide what works best for them, their lifestyle, their preferences.

I don't find the US News & World Report story particularly well thought out.

Most would not retire to Grand Rapids or St. Louis as both get snow in the winter. Most retirees prefer a warmer climate.

Similarly people say Phoenix and Tuscon are hard to take in summer. Very hot. Most leave town.

Military retirees prefer places with good medical. San Antonio, TX and Pensacola, FL are very popular.

People will tell you that US dollars go further in foreign countries. If you learn the language, understand the culture, and feel safe from crime and kidnapping, etc. Mexico, Costa Rico. I hear that in places like Sri Lanka, you can hire staff to do cooking, housekeeping, and gardening.

Big cities have the advantage of lots of things going on, but often that means congestion and higher living costs. Many prefer college towns. Students will do many jobs for minimum wage or little more and the college brings speakers and concerts to town as well as sports. Some like Columbia, MO or Springfield, MO are within easy drives to St. Louis or Kansas City (for big city shopping or travel, etc).

Some also like Branson for its entertainment opportunities. Low cost of living and still not far from big cities.

If you plan to travel, midwestern locations are centrally located. Indianapolis is not bad. Louisville. Memphis. Atlanta. Airport hubs can make travel easier if you plan to fly. Florida if you plan to cruise.

I'd give high marks to close to family. It can have many advantages. As long as its not too close.
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Most retirees prefer a warmer climate.

Perhaps, but studies show that most people retire within their own county. Beings how this is the Retire Well on Less board, I thought an article on where to retire on less made some sense.
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Thanks for the posting, Alstroemeria. I didn't mean that to sound too critical. I only wanted to contribute to the discussion.

studies show that most people retire within their own county.

Sure, that is close to family and friends. Decisions to move away from that are difficult. Some do it when they downsize. Better weather or better scenery are often given as reasons. Opportunity to play golf year round.
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Sure, that is close to family and friends. Decisions to move away from that are difficult.


Wasn't difficult for us. We moved clear across the country.
When you are retired, you have the choice to live anywhere you want.
I often find myself wondering where we will end up next. :)

AM
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I'd give high marks to close to family. It can have many advantages. As long as its not too close.



Good points!
But, I bought a house right down the block from my daughter and my two granddaughters. I can see her house from my driveway and I swore up and down that I would not live close to her. We survive here because we love the town. We can walk to the ocean. There are some decent restaurants. It's a very walkable little town. I told my daughter we would NEVER knock on her door and that we would always be here if she needed us. The only way to live close to your adult children when you retire is to mind your own business and have your own life.
We got a puppy in September and he's like having another kid. He's a full time job. We don't have to feel bad if we don't see our grandkids as much as we used to as they both go to school and they have lots of activities. Our pup takes up most of our time now so things are working out for all of us.
PS: my husband comes from Mexico and they'd have to helicopter us into an ex-pat enclave before we'd ever live in that dangerous country!
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Perhaps, but studies show that most people retire within their own county. Beings how this is the Retire Well on Less board, I thought an article on where to retire on less made some sense.



My husband and I much prefer living in New England after having moved from New York. The snow here was worse than Siberia but we managed quite well anyway. Florida has never appealed to us.
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studies show that most people retire within their own county.

Sure, that is close to family and friends. Decisions to move away from that are difficult. Some do it when they downsize. Better weather or better scenery are often given as reasons. Opportunity to play golf year round.



When hubby was working, we lived in an area called Brooklyn Heights. It's one of the most expensive places to live in NY. It's only one stop to Wall St. As a matter of fact, I could see Wall St. from my apartment. Anyway, there was absolutely NO way we could have stayed here after hubby left his high paying job. And, our children were not close by. The decision to sell the apartment and move closer to one of our kids was not a hard one. We've never been happier.
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Wasn't difficult for us. We moved clear across the country.
When you are retired, you have the choice to live anywhere you want.
I often find myself wondering where we will end up next. :)



Good for you! My husband and I feel the same way about moving.
We lived on Long Island for decades and then hubby lost his job and we had to relocate to Rhode Island just to keep going. He worked off and on until the age of 65 1/2 and then he quit. He could no longer work those 12 hour days. We moved 200 miles from NY to a little town on the coast of Massachusetts. My daughter lives down the block with our two grandkids. If they ever decided to move, we will not follow them. We love this town and our neighbors are wonderful.
I think happy people can be happy most anywhere.
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Bloomberg had an interesting article up the other day on why people aren't moving toe the "best cities" and where they are moving to.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-05-21/why-aren-t...

PF
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Good for you! My husband and I feel the same way about moving.
We lived on Long Island for decades and then hubby lost his job and we had to relocate to Rhode Island just to keep going. He worked off and on until the age of 65 1/2 and then he quit. He could no longer work those 12 hour days. We moved 200 miles from NY to a little town on the coast of Massachusetts. My daughter lives down the block with our two grandkids. If they ever decided to move, we will not follow them. We love this town and our neighbors are wonderful.
I think happy people can be happy most anywhere.

------------


We moved from Alabama to Washington State. From there to California. We are in California right now. And I find myself wishing for WARMER weather still. Not sure why... I used to like cooler weather... but the older I get, the warmer I want it. Still... it's hard to beat California. Never thought I would end up here - yet here we are.

AM
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<<Earlier this month, real estate brokerage Redfin published a list of America’s most bicycle-friendly cities, slotting Minneapolis first. That should seem a little ridiculous to anyone who has spent a winter in the North Star metropolis. Then again, hilliness and the number of bike commuters were part of the study’s methodology. The number of days cold enough to freeze snot to your upper lip was not.>>



Thus the limitation of "studies" is illustrated.


The best place for bicycling is a place where it never gets dark, since it's my observation that about 99.9% of bicycle trips are made during daylight hours.



Seattle Pioneer
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Thus the limitation of "studies" is illustrated.

The best place for bicycling is a place where it never gets dark, since it's my observation that about 99.9% of bicycle trips are made during daylight hours.

Seattle Pioneer


or in summer where the state bird is a mosquito
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The best place for bicycling is a place where it never gets dark, since it's my observation that about 99.9% of bicycle trips are made during daylight hours.

Arctic Circle environs in summer ;-)

I miss living in a drier climate for cycling (and other reasons). We've barely used our bikes since we lived in the San Ramon Valley. We loved the Iron Horse Trail, a paved railroad bed that passed right behind several quaint downtown areas like Danville. California has fine recreational amenities.
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Columbia,SC is where heat and humidity went to retire.
Now it stays there all the time.

Howie52
For those interested.
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I liked what Brooklyn48 said:

"My husband and I much prefer living in New England after having moved from New York. The snow here was worse than Siberia but we managed quite well anyway. Florida has never appealed to us."

We always lived in Connecticut but came to love Vermont, so we chose to buy a home and retire here. We have no regrets. We have a nice place (which we expanded and updated) on several acres, on a ridge, with views, enough lawn plus a LOT of trees, in a small community a few miles from a bigger city with a hospital (important, we figured). Our home also has most everything we need on the one floor, so aging troubles will be minimized. (Other rooms and bath are on another floor when guests come.)

One of our children lives maybe an hour away and we see her and her husband and kids in church, plus some other times. Other kids and families live farther away.

Bottom line: It all depends on what means the most to you! For us, the peace and quiet, the wind whispering in the trees, the lovely countryside, and new friends we've made here provide us with what we wanted in retirement. We don't go to shows or movies much, don't smoke or drink, and just wanted serenity for the most part.

Would Vermont suit everyone? We hope not, to be honest! But it suits us fine. Do whatever feels good for you!

Vermonter
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For us, the peace and quiet, the wind whispering in the trees, the lovely countryside, and new friends we've made here provide us with what we wanted in retirement. We don't go to shows or movies much, don't smoke or drink, and just wanted serenity for the most part.



Same here! Our neighbors are wonderful people. We live in an association with 18 townhouses. Most of us are in our 60's, 70's and 80's. My next door neighbor is 83 and she runs circles around me!
They are truly hardy New Englanders!
We live 17 miles from Boston so if we had to get really good medical care we have it there. Our local doctors are really quite good and well educated because of the many many colleges in Boston and several good medical schools.
As I've said before, we live within walking distance of the ocean and it's wonderful. The water is very clear unlike the East River where you cannot see a thing.
The local gourmet supermarket is within walking distance and worth going to when they have a sale otherwise we go to the big supermarket 5 miles away when we have a big shopping to do.
Yes, peace and serenity are tops on my list of priorities!
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Brooklyn1948:

Interesting.

Again, it all comes down to "whatever works well for YOU".

TBH, we would not want a townhouse; too close to other people. But YOU like it, so that's great -- and all that matters!

Forgive the long message, but...

We live on a dirt road (well maintained by the town, winter and summer), about 3 miles from a small shopping center with our post office (where we maintain a box), a pharmacy, grocery store, gas station, etc.) and we're 10 miles from a larger city, where there are MANY more shops, stores, and, importantly, a good hospital.

We have one neighbor maybe 1,000 feet away, and another on the other side of us on the adjoining acreage (whose home we can barely see through the woods). We rarely see either of them, but that's okay. They are there if we desperately need them, which is how many Vermonters are -- private but "there when needed". Across the road from us is a large plot of many acres, owned by the couple half a mile from us. He maintains it nicely as open field so she can train her horses.

Our land is 11 acres, mostly wooded, with enough lawn to keep mowed by hand and with my lawn tractor, and 700 feet of frontage on the dirt road. Down below and behind us, our land extends maybe 400 feet into pine forest, and then a large preserve below there.

We attend church regularly and thus have many friends there, whom we see socially on occasion.

If we sound a bit like hermits, maybe we are, I guess! But that's how we like to live. Again, the peace and quiet are essential.

Thankfully, we (I, really -- my wife doesn't use the computer by choice!) also have the internet, and I'm also a longtime ham radio operator, so we have various ways of contacting others (besides the telephone, of course!) when we want to.

To each his or her own. Enjoy! Peace be with you all!

Vermonter (74)
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TBH, we would not want a townhouse; too close to other people. But YOU like it, so that's great -- and all that matters!



Well, we lived on Long Island for decades and didn't have much to do with our neighbors. We lived in Brooklyn for 8 years and our apartment building had 110 units. The strange thing was that you could go months without seeing someone you knew.
We live in a townhouse down the block from our daughter and two grandkids BUT my husband said that if anything happened to me, and he was on his own, he'd buy a farm in NH or Maine.
We are introverts ourselves and I can see us living on a farm now because we have a dog that we have to take out several times a day on a street that is very heavily trafficked.
We could buy a farm for less money than we paid for this little house.
Something to think about.
Also, as the kids get older and their busy little schedules increase, we see them less and less. I had no idea that in the 2 1/2 years we lived close to them that this would happen. Daughter will go back to work and maybe, just maybe, we will get a glimpse of them driving down the block past our house OR see them on holidays.
They have their own lives.
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They have their own lives.


This, I think, is what parents often seem not to understand when they pick up everything and move "closer to the kids."

Maybe the kids really don't want you (the generic "you") that close - but don't say so, of course. Maybe they are thrilled to - AT LAST - be out from under the parental "eye" and able to more fully become adults themselves.

Maybe they want to rear up their children THEIR way - not the way you would do it.

Relationships among blood relatives are very complicated. Just stand back and observe at any family reunion. There is not one in ten million "Walton" families out there.

My advice is to live your OWN life and do what YOU want to do. If hubby is happier on a farm - then go get one. The kids will be fine without you. And isn't that what you wanted for them in the first place? Doesn't mean you will never see them again.

Again, "you" in this post means the generic "you" - not anyone in particular.

Just some thoughts on this subject.

AM
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Brooklyn:

"Also, as the kids get older and their busy little schedules increase, we see them less and less. I had no idea that in the 2 1/2 years we lived close to them that this would happen. Daughter will go back to work and maybe, just maybe, we will get a glimpse of them driving down the block past our house OR see them on holidays.
They have their own lives."

True.

Thankfully, our younger daughter and family remain close to us emotionally and across town physically (45 minutes away). The other kids are in other states and we see them less frequently.

We celebrate our 53rd anniversary this year, so it's good we enjoy each other's company!

Peace.

Vermonter
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10 Best Places... if you like cities?

We dislike cities, and I, in fact, hate them and go into one only if absolutely essential. I dislike the crowds, noise, and, honestly, expected increased crime rates therein. I always expect to be mugged somehow. Silly? Maybe, but that's how I feel.

So we'll stick to our quiet home with a view on a ridge in the woods.

Vermonter
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Brooklyn:

"We are introverts ourselves and I can see us living on a farm now because we have a dog that we have to take out several times a day on a street that is very heavily trafficked. We could buy a farm for less money than we paid for this little house. Something to think about."

So why not do it NOW?

By the way, we found that we both got headaches near the seashore in Maine, when we tried vacations there, so we chose the Vermont mountains instead. No headaches here for us!

Vermonter
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This, I think, is what parents often seem not to understand when they pick up everything and move "closer to the kids."



In our case it was my oldest daughter who told us that a house was on sale right down the block from her sister. I called my youngest daughter and she made an appointment to see the realtor the next day to see the house. She loved the house and gave me a very detailed description of it. She approved. All she had to do was say she didn't think the house was for us and we would have looked elsewhere.
The decision to move to her town was huge. It's worked out very well so far. We love the town and we have not been intrusive into their lives.
My husband said he would love a farm but he also said he'd like to backpack in Spain. One can never tell with him! I know that my daughter is relieved to have us close by because her children were missing out on having any relatives around at all. They love us and we love them.
As long as us oldsters know the ropes, I think we can live close by our kids successfully but have to realize that they do have their own lives and we have ours.
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So why not do it NOW?



We just got here and we both hate moving. We had to move quite a bit in the past 15 years due to job losses.
We love our little house. We love the ocean. The dog park is right down the street just a few minutes walk. The neighbors are lovely too.
Also, I need to be near good doctors and hospitals after having had two DVT's (blood clots) in both legs in the past 13 years.
Something to think about.
Also, the grandkids are adorable and they really love us and love the dog even more. We have been a good addition to their lives as they have been to ours.
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"My husband said he would love a farm but he also said he'd like to backpack in Spain. One can never tell with him!"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Although I cannot say this is a general rule. I can say a lot of
variation goes into dreaming about retirement. New and old
experiences drift into the thinking and sometimes into the planning
efforts.
You make lists of things you want to do, lists of places you want to
go - and begin to consider the time and costs involved. But not all
the things thought over become a true planned activity - and in
the process of thinking and planning you sometimes find that you
really do not want to spend the time and energy required.

Howie52
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My husband said he would love a farm but he also said he'd like to backpack in Spain.


Yep. This is the hard part. The older you get, the more you realize that there is just not going to be time to do everything. Then you become paralyzed trying to choose. :)

Some days I feel like that, too.

AM
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Brooklyn:

Oh - sorry about the clots!

Yes, you make my point: We all need to do what REALLY works for US and never mind what any survey or others suggest would be "better"!

Enjoy and peace be with you.

Vermonter
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Yes, you make my point: We all need to do what REALLY works for US and never mind what any survey or others suggest would be "better"!



We had our morning planned. Hubby would take pooch to the dog run and I would walk down to the store and get the newspapers and food for the day.
Get a text message from my daughter saying that "the girls" wanted to come on the dog's walk. All plans changed.
We All went to the pond instead of going our separate ways to the dog run and supermarket. The girls giggled the whole time. They love the dog. He's a good boy and loves the girls. A good time was had by all.
Afterwards, I walked my 3 girls home, hopped in the car with hubby and pooch and drove to the store to get needed items.
Nothing beats the joy of seeing how happy our puppy is to see the girls and vice versa.
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Brooklyn:

I smiled as I read your post.

Yup -- nothing like sharing joys, is there? And if you had moved FAR away, Skype would NOT be a substitute!

Vermonter
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Yup -- nothing like sharing joys, is there? And if you had moved FAR away, Skype would NOT be a substitute!




My face looks as round as the moon on SKYPE!!! Last time we used it was about 5 years ago. We could never get a good connection anyway.
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