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God bless Ina Garten (Food Network). She acknowledges that she does not like Cilantro and never uses it in her recipes. However, some chefs there (like Bobby Flay) and elsewhere somehow assume that Cilantro is "wonderful" and automatically pour it into salads and other things.

That particular herb or spice is sometimes truly despised by a lot of us, and we simply cannot eat it! I ran into it somewhere recently, and I had to simply not eat the salad served.

Please, please folks, allow for alternatives like parsley.

Just saying...

Vermonter
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That particular herb or spice is sometimes truly despised by a lot of us, and we simply cannot eat it!

I'm not at all fond of it, but. I love Thai and Tex-Mex, and it shows up frequently in those cuisines. For reasons beyond me, it doesn't bother me there. But there was a time, which I call "The Cilantro Wars," when it seemed like you couldn't get a milkshake without someone throwing it in.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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Used to be I did not know why some salsas made me cringe while others were fine. Now I know.

I'm told that absolutely fresh cilantro does not taste like dawn dishwashing liquid. Apparently I have never HAD fresh cilantro.

Teri ... count me amongst the haters
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I wish I knew why I hate Cilantro so, but I can't help it! It truly is repugnant to me -- even more so than liver, which is pretty yucko, too.

Then there's AVOCADO -- green toothpaste-like stuff, seemingly without any flavor, and yet seems so popular! Neither of us can understand why!

Oh well. Why the world turns?

Enjoy the day!

Vermonter
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In many Asian dishes, it's simply not an option to leave it out, and parsley isn't the same at all.

That said, I do understand there's some genetic variant that affects a certain % of people for whom it tastes foul. It goes beyond preference to taste receptors and genetics.

me, I looooooooooove the stuff.
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That said, I do understand there's some genetic variant that affects a certain % of people for whom it tastes foul. It goes beyond preference to taste receptors and genetics.


Evidently, the gene doesn't just effect the personal perception of the herb. It also causes those afflicted to whine about it incessantly.
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I'm extremely fascinated with this hate of cilantro. I happen to love it. I used to totally hate olives but I've developed a taste for them. Tarragon if too heavily used I can find offensive but I don't hear anyone complaining. There are so many possible offensive culinary treats that there must be some deeper, darker problem with cilantro.

Ed
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Then there's AVOCADO -- green toothpaste-like stuff, seemingly without any flavor, and yet seems so popular! Neither of us can understand why!

People from Vermont are not supposed to like avocado!


OleDoc
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People from Vermont are not supposed to like avocado!

Except for as the color scheme for their kitchen appliances.
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Evidently, the gene doesn't just effect the personal perception of the herb. It also causes those afflicted to whine about it incessantly.


Now I understand why a post on this board got so many (well-deserved) recs!
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Dear BA Foodist,
Cilantro is everywhere, and I hate it. Is there another herb I can use in its place?
--Jessica *******, Santa Cruz, CA

Dear Jessica,

Do you want the good news or the bad news first? The bad news: No, there really isn't a replacement herb for cilantro, also known as fresh coriander. Flat-leaf parsley looks similar, but the flavors couldn't be more different. I have a friend who minces a little basil, a little parsley, and a little mint to mimic the taste and texture of cilantro. She claims it does the trick. Having tried her salsa, I don't think so.

The good news? You're not alone. We all know someone who won't go into a room where cilantro is being served. Most of these haters describe the aroma and flavor as "soapy," and some scientists believe that there is a specific gene that causes such a reaction. Cilantro does lose some of its aroma when heated, but, unfortunately for you, it is most often served in its raw state.

There's more bad news, too. Cilantro is said to be the world's most widely consumed fresh herb, used in abundance in Latin America, India, China, Southeast Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. In the future, as cooking from those areas grows more and more popular in America, you're going to see lots more cilantro.


Read More http://www.bonappetit.com/blogsandforums/blogs/bafoodist/200...
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NoIDAtAll:

Thanks.

I rest my case. I don't care if a lot of people DO like it, but I have to wonder why so many cooks seem to ASSUME that we ALL do!? It's not like salt and pepper, after all. It IS rather unique.

Vermonter
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