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No. of Recommendations: 0
 27% (12 Votes)
1 or less
 22% (10 Votes)
2
 22% (10 Votes)
3
 11% (5 Votes)
4
 15% (7 Votes)
5 or more
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1 or less. Might help to explain my exceptionally bad story writing skills, heh.
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2, but they aren't Fiction, Poetry, or Drama.

Does that count?

k
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No. of Recommendations: 1
2, but they aren't Fiction, Poetry, or Drama.

Does that count?


Sure, none of the four I'm reading right now are f,p or d either.
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I finished one last night, (Sherri Tepper Fresco which was tres tres tres good read) but I'll start another tonight so I'll still have 3 going.

The one I'm starting tonight is the one that was picked for Oprah's book club and the author refused to go on her show.

6
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I finished one last night, (Sherri Tepper Fresco which was tres tres tres good read) but I'll start another tonight so I'll still have 3 going.

I usually have 3 books going at once. Right now I have four.

I have my 'bathroom' reading which is usually something I can read in shorter segments. Sometimes a technical book, sometimes something else, usually nonfiction for some reason. Right now this is "The Thinker's Way" by John Chaffee.

I have my "in the car" book. This is usually something that I am not enthralled with. This often sits for long periods of time, but is there if I get stuck waiting for something. "Don't Worry, Make Money" by Richard Carlson is the current one in this category.

Then I have my "bedtime reader". This is usually the book I am most interested in. Right now it is "The Origins of Consciousness In Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind" by Jaynes (I know, but the book is much more fascinating than the title). But this is often a quick read novel or something just for fun.

Since my daughter is 19+ months old, I am also reading "What to expect the Toddler Years". It is a good parenting book that goes month by month with the type of things to expect. I only read a month or two ahead of where my daughter is actually at, so I'll probably be reading this one off and on for another year or so.

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I have my "in the car" book. This is usually something that I am not enthralled with. This often sits for long periods of time, but is there if I get stuck waiting for something. "Don't Worry, Make Money" by Richard Carlson is the current one in this category.

I can't read in the car. I stock up on airplane reading though, I have to have some easy reading absorbing type fiction to get through flights without strangling someone these days.

I've got that Ornstein book about the hemispheres going, and also Wolfram's New Science book. That one is almost a chore but I know I'll be a better person for having read it, or at least other people will think I'm a better person. At least there are pictures.

I don't read in bed, one of my worst faults is being one of those people whom reading does not make sleepy. I hate that.

I have little handheld games in the john. (TMI!)

6
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I can't read in the car.

I don't read while driving or passengering. I have the "in the car" book for when I go to get the oil changed, or go to get my haircut, or at a doctor's office or ... Anytime I have to sit and wait for awhile. That's why this book usually takes me a long time to read.

"Don't Worry, Make Money" is the perfect book for this. It's kind of a silly little book that I don't have a great need to finish quickly. It is all very short little one or two page essays, so if my wait is short I am not caught in the middle of an exciting chapter. I would not recommend it as a "great read", but is does have some good ideas and the format fits my "in the car" book.
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I don't read in bed, one of my worst faults is being one of those people whom reading does not make sleepy. I hate that.

It all depends on the book for me. Since, if I'm lucky I only get about 6 or so hours of sleep a night (toddler, remember), I usually don't have problems falling asleep. Sometimes I get captured by a book and read too far into the night. Heck, that's what coffee is for the next day.
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Three books.

"The Private Eye Writers of America Presents Mystery Street."
I've never really read the hardboiled PI books. This is a great intro. Not graphically violent, which is what I like.

Mordecai Richler - Dispatches from the Sporting Life.

Eve Hahn - Eve and the Apes.
Eve Hahn is a fascinating woman. First woman to graduate geology from Madison (I think that's the school). Went to China, became an opium addict, had a torrid affair with Charles Boxer (himself a fascinating personality), wouldn't leave when the Japanese invaded; an incredible life.

My car book is The Last Cuckoo - Letters to the Times. I think I'm going to switch it to The Daily Telegraph Obituaries. They are mini-biographies that are fascinating and often quite funny.

Thuvia
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I don't read while driving or passengering. I have the "in the car" book for when I go to get the oil changed, or go to get my haircut, or at a doctor's office or ... Anytime I have to sit and wait for awhile. That's why this book usually takes me a long time to read.

Aah, that's a really, very, super good idea.

I'm gonna steal it.

6
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The one I'm starting tonight is the one that was picked for Oprah's book club and the author refused to go on her show.

I wanted to read that one, but couldn't remember the title or author. What is it?
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I wanted to read that one, but couldn't remember the title or author. What is it?

I'll remember once I've started it, I haven't really looked since I dropped it on the counter. Remind me in a couple of days.

6
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It was recently my b-day (21st - yay!) so I recieved a ton of books. I have a pile of about ten books to work through over the summer. I usually read a book anywhere, anytime (though never in the bathroom).

I have several business books (A Brand New World by Scott Bedbury, Out of Control by Kevin Kelly, Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits by Philip Fisher, Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edwin Lefevre, and some others). I have one sci-fi book - Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes. Finally have four Mickey Spillane novels (The Killing Man, Black Alley, The Snake, and The Girl Hunters) to go with my two collections of his work.

My tastes tend to follow similar patterns - about half business books, and half sci-fi or classic fiction (Spillane or classic golden age sci-fi).

Steve
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Steve,

Congrats on your birthday. If you're already reading business books at age 21 you're ahead of most of your peers. Just wanted to point out that Philip Fisher's book is in a class by itself as far as investment books are concerned. It's not "easy" reading, but it's the kind of book that should be read several times. Perhaps "studied" is a better word than "read" in this case.

poorboy
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poorboy,

Thanks for the congrats. I have been wanting to read Fisher for quite some time, as I knew of his importance in the business world. I am very pleased to finally have a copy to read, and will take my time to savor it.

It will be interesting to compare Fisher's ideas with much of the business books from the 1990s (Moore, Hamel, Christenson etc.). They are not writing about the same things of course, but I suspect there will be subtle parallels all the same.

I have a link in my interview as to what I have been reading if you are interested. I would appreciate any other suggestion you have.

Steve
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I'm reading:

A History of God
An oop SF book by eluki bes shahar called 'Archangel Blues'
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire
Self-Editing: How to Edit Yourself Into Print
Some Turtledove book I have in the backseat of my car, alternate history.
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Steve,

I highly recommend "Where Are The Customers' Yachts?" by Fred Schwed, Jr. Mr. Schwed wrote this book in 1940 after having spent time as a broker during the Depression. It is a very funny book. The author had a very cynical writing style, and nothing on Wall Street was safe from his skewer, including himself. Any Wall Streeter who starts to take him or herself too seriously should be sat down and forced to read this book.

Loved your Alan Greenspan quote.

poorboy
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Currently reading:

Cadillac Jukebox, James Lee Burke
A Drink Before the War, Dennis Lehane
No Colder Place, S.J. Rozan
A Cook's Tour, Tony Bourdain
The Elements of Style, Strunk and White (No, really)

Erik
And a few cookbooks too. :-)
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Just Curious, How many books are you reading right now?

I'm reading:

The George Eliot Murders (general carry around the house reading)

Zero - The Biography of a Dangerous Number (That's my 'basement' book. I keep it in the workshop and read a chapter now and then when I'm waiting for varnish to dry or just to avoid the next step in finishing a bit of work)

Choosing The Perfect Dog (Bathroom book)

And if Comic books count I'm going thru a set from the 60's and 70's that my father picked up at auction. I'm readin...uh...checking them carefully for flaws.

l1soul
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A Cook's Tour, Tony Bourdain

Kitchen Confidential was a masterpiece.

6
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Kitchen Confidential was a masterpiece.

6


I agree. I will never order fish on a weekend now.

Thuvia
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I agree. I will never order fish on a weekend now.

Not only that, I've seriously considered saving up for a trip to Japan only to eat the sushi.

6
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Re eating sushi:

Basically, in the US, you want to eat sushi and sashimi that was PREVIOUSLY FROZEN. This ensures that any worms/parasites are dead. Fortunately, the vast majority of restaurants serve previously frozen seafood.

You are taking a big risk eating fresh seafood raw.

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No. of Recommendations: 3
I have little handheld games in the john.. (TMI!)

So do us guys.



(Oops, wrong board).
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I'm reading:
A History of God


God: A Biography by Jack Miles was outstanding.
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And if Comic books count I'm going thru a set from the 60's and 70's that my father picked up at auction. I'm readin...uh...checking them carefully for flaws.

Jealous.

We may need a comic book board here.
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Basically, in the US, you want to eat sushi and sashimi that was PREVIOUSLY FROZEN. This ensures that any
worms/parasites are dead. Fortunately, the vast majority of restaurants serve previously frozen seafood.


I have recently become fascinated with Japanese food, thanks to A Cook's Tour and Tony Bourdain. And that includes sushi/sashimi. As with almost every other food, it's freshness that is important here. You wouldn't use 2 day old fish for sashimi. But like investing, eating involves risk and reward. Here in Minnesota, we're living large if we put salt and pepper in our hotdish. ;-) The Japanese are living (or dying) large if they eat Fugu. Chefs have to get special certification to cook this fish. The remnants of the fish need to be stored under lock and key. I will never eat Fugu, but I'm going to eat sushi/sashimi first chance I get. I'm just going to make sure it's fresh, fresh, fresh.

Erik
Sorry for being OT.
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I highly recommend "Where Are The Customers' Yachts?" by Fred Schwed, Jr.

Thank you for the recommendation! I think I have it on my bookshelf somewhere, and I will try and read it as soon as I can.

Steve
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Why in the US as opposed to elsewhere? I wouldn't eat Sushi outside of a major city, frankly, with first-class sushi chefs. And I would never eat discount sushi. You get what you pay for. You want a place that moves its product.

And as Anthony Bourdain says in "Kitchen Confidential," never order fish on a Monday.

Basically, in the US, you want to eat sushi and sashimi that was PREVIOUSLY FROZEN. This ensures that any
worms/parasites are dead. Fortunately, the vast majority of restaurants serve previously frozen seafood.
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I wouldn't eat Sushi outside of a major city, frankly, with first-class sushi chefs. And I would never eat discount sushi. You get what you pay for. You want a place that moves its product.

I live in a small city (40,000 +/-). Recently an Asian market opened within walking distance of my home that makes sushi every day and prepackages them. You go to the refrigerator, pick out what you want and pay for it. The average lunch costs about $4.50, with the top prices maxing out at about $7.50. The smoked eel (unagi) is to die for -- no pun intended. The owner/chef was the sushi sensai at one of the pricier restaurants, but wanted to go into business for himself and introduce Japanese food to a wider audience. I have yet to have anything bad that this guy prepares. From the look of his store, he's going to be here a while. Woo hoo!

On the other hand, I live in a seaport and seafood is ridiculously cheap compared to other places. My favorite fish market sometimes sells chicken lobsters, about 1 to 1 1/2 pounds, cooked for $5, lobster rolls with at least 3/4 of a pound of shell and tail meat and almost no mayonaise for $7 (another buck will get you a tub of home made cole slaw), and one of DH's running buddies's cousins is a shrimper who sells shrimps straight off his boat for a dollar or two a pound to friends.

Uhura :o)
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Here in Minnesota, we're living large if we put salt and pepper in our hotdish. ;-)

The weird thing is that in the past three or four years, a pile of very good sushi places have opened up in the twin cities. If you're near, Tango Sushi (or Sushi Tango) in Calhoun Square (uptown Mpls) is world class, really.

6
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I suppose I should amend my statement to say I would never buy sushi away from the east or west coasts. And though I am an east coaster, for some reason west coast sushi always tastes better. But there are always exceptions.
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And though I am an east coaster, for some reason west coast sushi always tastes better.

From I've been told (I was told this in both Cali and Florida) all the sushi in the US comes through San Francisco.

6
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"Why in the US as opposed to elsewhere?"

Re sushi, I made that qualification because it could be that in Japan fresh sushi can be safely eaten. But here, unless you want to take the risk of growing a four-foot worm in your guts, stick with previously frozen seafood.

Most fish, particularly cold-water varieties, goes bad within a few days, even if kept continuously on ice. Given that the fishing boats will stay out for days at a time, the odds of you getting good "fresh" fish without catching it yourself are very slim ...
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6,

Tango Sushi (or Sushi Tango) in Calhoun Square (uptown Mpls) is world class, really.

That's what I've heard.

To get back to books :-), I really liked Kitchen Confidential. I like Tony Bourdain's writing style and his cynical wit, and his "eating out rules" are classic.

Erik
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re "all sushi from san francisco"

I doubt that. I know the chefs here buy a lot of their fish at the Fulton Fish Market, like every other restaurant in town. That's why Bourdain says don't eat fish on Monday, cause the market is closed on Sunday and the last time fresh stuff came was on Friday.
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"A History of God - Mapletree3"

Who wrote it? I am reading The Battle for God, by Karen Armstrong, and it is a fascinating account of the history of Fundamentalism. (Across all religions.) And why Fundamentalists are fighting the battle for God right now. She has excellent credentials, BTW.

roko2
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Who wrote it? I am reading The Battle for God, by Karen Armstrong, and it is a fascinating account of the history of Fundamentalism. (Across all religions.) And why Fundamentalists are fighting the battle for God right now. She has excellent credentials, BTW.

It was also written by Armstrong! So far, pretty good. Accurate as to what I already know, clearly informative otherwise.

-mapletree
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Greetings,

My car book is always an anthology of short stories,The years best SF or fantasy or whatever. I'm always chauffering somebody, so while I'm waiting for my passenger to show up,or an oil change etc, I read. A collection of short stories is great for this.

I'm wrapping up Storm of Swords, (book III of Song of Fire and Ice by G.R.R. Martin), I've started the Tomb of God, and I've got 2 tech books for work.

Cheers.
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