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I've tried low carb/high protein.
I've tried chromium.
I've tried biotin.
What are chromium and biotin?
I have carbohydrates in my pants.

Click here to see results so far.

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RE: Survey: None of the above.
Ted (but I have read several reports that limiting carbos may be a good thing and am considering it.)
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Ahem, if the answer is "none of the above" you are REQUIRED to choose the "pants" option. Don't you know the LBYM rules? (just kidding!)

Maybe you should stop by the Lo-Carb board and chat with some of those folks, too! The way I understand it, the simple carbs like sugar and refined flour are worst (obviously) and whole grains are better. But protein is also a key factor.

Good luck on the maintenance of your diabetes!

jrsmith13
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I think you need to make this into two polls. One for the low carb and one for the supplements. They are not mutually exclusive.

Susan
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I am on a "controlled" carb diet, meaning 4 exchanges per meal. But I also have of carb in my waisteline, so the pants option might apply too. I do not take supliments if not prescribed by a doctor.
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Chromium picolinate or GTF Chromium is very effective. I have not tried Biotin specifically. Low carb/high protein diets are detrimental to your lean body muscle and organs. The Zone diet is leaps and bounds better.
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Low carb/high protein diets are detrimental to your lean body muscle and organs.

What makes you say this?

Susan
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Low carb/high protein diets are detrimental to your lean body muscle and organs.

What makes you say this?

Susan

===================================

Ditto, most body building magazines I've read tell body builders to take in atlest one gram of Protein per pound of body weight to increase muscle mass.What gives??

J.P.

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Ditto, most body building magazines I've read tell body builders to take in atlest one gram of Protein per pound of body weight to increase muscle mass.What gives??

One gram of protein contains 4 calories. If a 150 pound person followed this, then he/she would take in 4 x 150 = 600 calories.

A very rough rule of thumb says that a moderately active person will burn about 9 to 10 calories a day per pound of body weight. So lets say our hypothetical person needs about 1500 calories to maintain his/her weight normal active weight plus whatever number of calories is taken off with exercise.

What percentage of your diet do you want to satisfy with protein, with carbohydrate, with fat?

Let's say our person was working out quite hard and using up 500 extra calories per day for a total need of 2000 to maintain body weight. This puts him/her at 600 calories of protein divided by 2000 calories needed which equals a diet of 30% protein.

What do you think? Is this about the right amount of protein?
Most books I have seen say that we should have about 30% fat. That leaves about 40% to come from carbohydrates.

I'm just playing with numbers here to see what seems reasonable.
Ted
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One gram of protein contains 4 calories. If a 150 pound person followed this, then he/she would take in 4 x 150 = 600 calories.

What type of protein are we talking about??I've never heard of the 150 body builder class. Not to say that one doesn't exist, I just don't know about it. More on this later.

A very rough rule of thumb says that a moderately active person will burn about 9 to 10 calories a day per pound of body weight. So lets say our hypothetical person needs about 1500 calories to maintain his/her weight normal active weight plus whatever number of calories is taken off with exercise.

Burn 9-10 calories per pound of body weight or (lbm) lean body mass??Body builders take in many more calories to maintain than an average person.

Your average steak contains about 7-grams of protein depending on size.For a 240lb body builder, that's a lot of steak. What most do is digest MRP's (meal replacement packages) such as Myoplex which uses whey protein. One packet contains about 45 grams of protein and is between 200-300 calories.
Body builders load up on protein in the off season, then lower their caloric intake during competition.Since their lean body mass is so large, they burn a lot more calories resting than most people since muscle is where fat is burned.It's not unheard of for a body builder to take in 3000-4000 calories a day (and sometimes higher) and lift 2-3 hours a day.

I am at work, but I have myoplex at home. I may post the nutrition info later. I does have carbs in it too.


J.P.



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What type of protein are we talking about??I've never heard of the ...150 body builder class. Not to say that one doesn't exist, I just don't know about it. More on this later.

J. P. I think we are talking apples and oranges here. You are talking serious body builders. I was talking about an average diabetic person weigning about 150 pounds and considering whether one gram of protein per pound of body weight was a reasonable number for that diabetic.

I assumed that if an average diabetic was trying to gain muscle mass, he might add 500 calories per day to his average daily activities in his quest to build more muscle mass. and from that calculated that he might have about 30% protein in his diet at that point.

Again, this being a board for diabetics, I was attempting to think in terms of average people and seeing how that quotation about "one gram of protein per pound of body weight would apply to a reasonable diet for them, NOT how it would apply for serious body builders.

Sorry if I caused confusion
Ted
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Well, I botched the italics. It should have been as follows:

What type of protein are we talking about??I've never heard of the ...150 body builder class. Not to say that one doesn't exist, I just don't know about it. More on this later.

J. P. I think we are talking apples and oranges here. You are talking serious body builders. I was talking about an average diabetic person weigning about 150 pounds and considering whether one gram of protein per pound of body weight was a reasonable number for that diabetic.

I assumed that if an average diabetic was trying to gain muscle mass, he might add 500 calories per day to his average daily activities in his quest to build more muscle mass. and from that calculated that he might have about 30% protein in his diet at that point.

Again, this being a board for diabetics, I was attempting to think in terms of average people and seeing how that quotation about "one gram of protein per pound of body weight would apply to a reasonable diet for them, NOT how it would apply for serious body builders.

Sorry if I caused confusion
Ted
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Your average steak contains about 7-grams of protein depending on size

I don't think that's right. A 1/4 lb patty of extra lean ground beef (96% lean) contains 25 g of protein according to the package. I would think "your average steak" would be more like 8-12 oz and contain 6-9 oz of extra lean meat... I would guess it's more like 50 g of protein per average steak...


OleDoc
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Chromium picolinate or GTF Chromium is very effective

And recently received some bad press. (I'll try to find a link.)

Low carb/high protein diets are detrimental to your lean body muscle and organs

Would love to see some statistics to back this up.

Christina
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I would guess it's more like 50 g of protein per average steak.

Bingo! According to the chart I have, a 6 oz sirloin steak has 51 grams of protein.

Christina
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As I said before, I was at work at the time I posted it and was writing from memory.

***"At 200-500 grams per day (You should be eating at least one gram of protein per pound of bodyweight).."


*Beef Flank 6oz. 33g protein, 18g Fat, 7.8 grams of saturated fat, 306 calories,zero carbs.


at that rate, a 200 lb man would have to eat six of them taking in all that extra fat as well.

**1 packet of Myoplex, 42 grams protein,2 grams of total fat, 1 gram of saturated fat,280 calories,total carbs 24 grams, sugars 3 grams it also has 21 vitamins and minerals of 50% RDA or better.

*Sorce for beef flank: C.T. Netzer, Encylopedia of Food Values, NY:Dell publishing.


FWIW

J.P.
**Taken directly from a Myoplex packet.

*** Taken from Flex magazine, August 2000, pg 162 "protein wars"
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TVP (textured vegetable protein) is high-quality soy protein and not much else. Want 150 grams of protein without carbs or fat? Weigh out 150 grams of TVP and put it in the soup. Might want to add a jolt of something to hide the cardboard flavour.

Or, one could snarf down 3 lbs of tofu, and get stuck with 90 g fat (15 g saturated), 15 g carbs, and 15 g fiber [source: White Wave tofu label].


If i wanted to force protein without the collateral damage of a cholesterol bomb, i would go with TVP at about $2/lb. 150 g (1/3 lb) seems a bit much to munch in a day, though.


cassandra


/**/
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Your average steak contains about 7-grams of protein depending on size


Meat sources generally give you 7g protein per ounce.

ab
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Meat sources generally give you 7g protein per ounce.

So I eat 1 ounce steaks ;-)

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