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No. of Recommendations: 0
What is your biggest expense in retirement?
Housing
Medical Care/Insurance
Travel
Food
Other

Click here to see results so far.

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No. of Recommendations: 8
Taxes should be a choice.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
I answered other. Taxes by a long shot are my biggest expense.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
We only have a couple of years in full retirement to go by. It varies, but according to Quicken records for the whole period...

1. Taxes (includes real estate taxes)
2. Charity
3. Food (groceries and eating out, including on vacation)
4. Medical (including insurance premiums)
5. Vacation (mostly hotels, airfare, rentals)

I'm sure our situation is atypical. We're pretty frugal, generally, but I think we give generously compared to a lot of people. I had a couple of extra medical expenses since retirement, so I expect that to go down (knock on wood). We're doing reasonably well on a subsidized Bronze ACA plan.

We don't have much allocated to housing, since the mortgage is paid off and a lot of the other housing expenses show up in taxes, utilities and insurance categories. We're looking at spending some money on deferred repairs and getting the house ready to sell, so that may inflate it temporarily this year.

Cars are paid for, so just gasoline and maintenance costs for them. We've taken a few large trips and many small ones, since retirement. Expect to be away from home a total of around 2 months/year, but we try to keep our vacation spending reasonable.

I guess I've got to go with "Other".
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We live in a CCRC, which provides shelter, food, and medical care. The CCRC is our biggest expense.

CNC
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No. of Recommendations: 5
We live in a CCRC, which provides shelter, food, and medical care. The CCRC is our biggest expense.

This points out the major issue with most polls in TMF. I dare say more than 75% of people here would consider food, shelter and medical as separate items. Maybe CNC could breakout those three from his total CCRC - but if so, it most likely would be an average for the community -- he likely does not know the exact costs of his medical care for example.

Another poll recently that seem silly was what part of the country to retire in -- people are different. We moved from Atlanta to Gainesville, GA. We grumble about the lack of good restaurants - we don't eat out 20 times a year. Last Friday we drove 45 miles north and had a fabulous meal in the small town of Clayton, GA.

Some people care a lot about fishing or hunting or classical music and some even dislike neighbors. Instead of making snide remarks about somebody's likes/- be thankful there are not 10 million retirees who want exactly what you have and move there.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
Another poll recently that seem silly was what part of the country to retire in -- people are different. We moved from Atlanta to Gainesville, GA. We grumble about the lack of good restaurants - we don't eat out 20 times a year. Last Friday we drove 45 miles north and had a fabulous meal in the small town of Clayton, GA.

I retired 16 miles from where I was hatched! Sonoma County, CA, wine country, was at times, milk, eggs, rabbits, chickens, prunes, berries, apple, cherry, hops, and even string bean country... Today the vineyards have made the rolling hills green at times when in the old days, they be just golden dry grass... Population has climbed, we're too close to the SF Bay Area for it to not climb.. But we moved eventually off the the farm to the fringe of town that was all of 13K, now over 60K... Home used to be an onion field, hay before that... Changes, sure, but my job took me all over Northern California as well as the valley, Sierras, as well asa bit overseas and Hawaii.. But this is home, always will be, maybe 25 miles to the Coast, a few hours to the Sierras, perfect base to wander from and return to.. Hopefully will stay in our home to the end game, whenever that comes along..

Lately, the last couple years, the biggest expense has been remodeling, upgrading, fixing problem areas as they come along..

weco, here for the time left to us...
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No. of Recommendations: 3
We are starting some home renovations which will redo 3 bathrooms and the kitchen to make
the house more accessible for DW. If she needs to use a wheel chair following back surgery next year
she will be able to stay in the house.

The back surgery may become a greater expense next year. But you have interactions between food -
medical care - and housing. DW was told she needed to lose weight before back surgery - and
she needed help for that and joined a weight-lose program which cost a pretty penny. But she has
lost 55lbs over 8 months and is doing wonderfully. She also needs to improve her bone density which
is also diet and medicine related.

Howie52
Life tends to be more complex than polls can possibly allow.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
She also needs to improve her bone density which
is also diet and medicine related.


Howie, forgive the assumption that you may need this information, but it is amazing to me how few doctors understand the roll of Vitamin K2 in getting calcium to the bones. Make sure to discuss it with your doctors and look into it yourself if it's not part of her supplements. K2 is critical in getting calcium out of the soft tissues and into the bone. Over the counter lost cost product. Anyone who consumes calcium or takes supplements should be taking it. You want that calcium getting to the bones, not causing calcification of the arteries.

Inadequate calcium intake can lead to decreased bone mineral density, which can increase the risk of bone fractures. Supplemental calcium promotes bone mineral density and strength and can prevent osteoporosis. Recent scientific evidence, however, suggests that elevated consumption of calcium supplements may raise the risk for heart disease and can be connected with accelerated deposit of calcium in blood-vessel walls and soft tissues. In contrast, vitamin K2 is associated with the inhibition of arterial calcification and arterial stiffening. An adequate intake of vitamin K2 has been shown to lower the risk of vascular damage because it activates matrix GLA protein (MGP), which inhibits the deposits of calcium on the walls.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566462/#:~:tex....

https://americanbonehealth.org/nutrition/vitamin-k2-plays-ke....

https://josr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1301...

IP
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I answered other. Taxes by a long shot are my biggest expense.

I also had to select other. Taxes have been my biggest expense since retiring in 2013. The other expense categories aren't even remotely close to taxes (Federal, state, and foreign income taxes; local property taxes; and sales/use taxes).
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Hi darrellquock,

Other, our house.

Last year and this year, building our house is far and away the highest expense item.


Gene
All holdings and some statistics on my Fool profile page
http://my.fool.com/profile/gdett2/info.aspx
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What is the range one can expect to cost for medical and dental (and vision) insurance during retirement?

Currently, with a good contribution from my employer, I am still paying 7 or 8K per year for those for a small family, not counting the out of pockets.

Without my employer, I may pay double or more of that.
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With Medicare A, Traditional Part B, Part D, and Supplemental F for the two of us, all cost included runs about $9k each/year.
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What is the range one can expect to cost for medical and dental (and vision) insurance during retirement?

I'm sure a high deductible ACA plan is not the best for everyone, but worth considering, particularly if you can keep your adjusted gross income (Technically, your Modified Adjusted Gross Income, or MAGI) low enough to qualify for a subsidy and you don't expect high out of pocket medical expenses.

Last year, our insurance premiums were negligible, with a subsidized Bronze ACA plan for my wife and I. No Dental and no Vision coverage. We spent around $6k out of pocket, including a Crown, an eye procedure, a few prescriptions, blood work, routine eye and dental and a couple of family practice appointments. One of the more expensive things was a Restasis prescription.
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I answered other. Taxes by a long shot are my biggest expense.

My first thought was you must be freaking rich. But our combined Federal plus (CA) State income tax for 2021 is around $10K. I suppose if we add sales tax, gas tax, etc, yes, taxes were our biggest single expense.

Oh course, by now our retirement home has that honor.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
our combined Federal plus (CA) State income tax for 2021 is around $10K.

Trust me. There are people paying more than that on their RMDs. And no, not rich.
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Trust me. There are people paying more than that on their RMDs. And no, not rich.

Define "rich".
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No. of Recommendations: 9
I answered other. Taxes by a long shot are my biggest expense.

My first thought was you must be freaking rich. But our combined Federal plus (CA) State income tax for 2021 is around $10K. I suppose if we add sales tax, gas tax, etc, yes, taxes were our biggest single expense. - CNC


================

I am not filthy rich but am very comfortable. I live in Texas so high property taxes are a given, mine are about $8K per year, toss in sales tax for another couple thousand a year and around $10K goes to state and local.

The big hitter is federal. I have a good baseline income with SS, Pension, interest income, and a few other things, but whatever that total is, I do a Roth conversion to bring me up to the near top of the 24% bracket. For 2021 and single, that bracket max is $164,925 with an associated tax of $33,603. So that is $43K per year to fed, state and local. I live a pretty simple and low cost lifestyle so that $43K for taxes is more spending than everything else combined.
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No. of Recommendations: 14
Y'all who answered taxes are lucky, and/or very well capitalized / successful - I hope you realize that.

I answered Housing, because even with a locked in low interest rate I'm at 24K/year between mortgage & interest, property tax, insurance and HA fee.

We can't sell because...we can't. Everything around here is (still) beyond ridiculous price. Nor do we really want to, because for $2,000 a month, try to find a beautiful house with no-build conservation land (woods) behind it. Ha. $2000 a month gets you a studio in Portsmouth or a 2 bedroom in the boondocks 20 miles west of it.

Don't want to pay off a 3.5% 30 year, certainly not now.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
CNC wrote Define "rich"

I have observed the most common definition of rich is more than I earn. Why do people with higher incomes avoid saying they are rich?

After looking up the percentile income numbers I decided rich is something in the range of $100,000 from my view point.

People whose adjusted gross incomes are $70,000 earn more than 75% of income tax returns.
With AGI at $110,000 a return is in the top 10%.
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"Taxes by a long shot are my biggest expense."

My first thought was you must be freaking rich. But our combined Federal plus (CA) State income tax for 2021 is around $10K.


All you need is decent sized IRA account(s) and RMD. Plus a low/mid 5-figure Roth conversion.
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CountNoCount
Define "rich".

Depends..
Maybe start with this article https://www.supermoney.com/much-money-take-considered-rich-u... and the New York Times app mentioned in the article https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012...

George
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No. of Recommendations: 12
I have observed the most common definition of rich is more than I earn. Why do people with higher incomes avoid saying they are rich?

After looking up the percentile income numbers I decided rich is something in the range of $100,000 from my view point.


Personally, I don't consider income to be the determination of whether someone is "rich". Rich to me is measured by accumulated assets/wealth. If you have enough assets to support $100k+ in annual spending indefinitely, yeah you're rich.
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Why do people with higher incomes avoid saying they are rich?

It's a mind set. Having spent most of our life earning and saving money, often by our frugality, we don't believe we are rich, even though comparatively we may be so relative to others.

Taxes are our highest cost as well, mostly because we really don't spend much. That may change some day, when travel becomes easier for us. If you had asked me that question a couple of years ago, it would have been college costs, but Youngest happily has graduated and now costs us almost nothing.

Our vehicles are 18 years old and 9 years old. We don't let money burn a hole in our pockets and are easily content.

IP
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No. of Recommendations: 8
It's all relative.

1poorlady was born in the Philippines. The first time I went there I realized there are very few poor people in the USA. By Philippine standards. I've also seen that in other places (e.g. Mexico).

By American standards, I'm not particularly rich. I shouldn't have to worry about having food and shelter ever again, and I can afford medical insurance (thanks to the ACA). If that's "rich", then I am. Would I be able to support a boat, RV, a new car every few years, and other "toys" that I see in peoples' driveways? Probably not. But that's not important to me anyway.

I hope my biggest expense in retirement is taxes. Taxes are just a portion of income, so that would imply I had a lot of income. I could live with that. House is nearly paid off (about 1 more year), and then it's just food, utilities, taxes, doctors, and "play" (e.g. travel).

1poorguy
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axes are just a portion of income, so that would imply I had a lot of income.

Not necessarily. You pay taxes on more than just income. Property taxes can be a massive expense for seniors, and one for which they cannot easily substitute.

Assessed values in my country popped 20% in the last year. Thankfully, we have state cap on how much we can be charged in property taxes but I imagine that there are a few seniors in my community that might be challenged to pay their higher rate - and of course their are many areas facing far greater increases.
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Assessed values in my country popped 20% in the last year. Thankfully, we have state cap on how much we can be charged in property taxes but I imagine that there are a few seniors in my community that might be challenged to pay their higher rate - and of course their are many areas facing far greater increases.

We have a law that says reassessments have to be revenue neutral. If the average assessed value increases by 20% as in your example, the property tax is adjusted downward from the current 1% to 0.83% to maintain the same tax revenue.

PSU
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A couple of questions --

Is that $100K per person of per family?

Does the $100K include Social Security and any pensions?
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CNC: Define "rich".

That word always remind me of an expression that I learned when I lived in Texas. "Big hat! No cattle!" It implies more image than substance.
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A couple of questions --

Is that $100K per person of per family?

Does the $100K include Social Security and any pensions?


The numbers are for the tax return filed for the family.
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We have a law that says reassessments have to be revenue neutral. If the average assessed value increases by 20% as in your example, the property tax is adjusted downward from the current 1% to 0.83% to maintain the same tax revenue.

PSU


We have the same law, but the upper middle class neighborhoods always get clobbered as the property values rise much more than in the lower income neighborhoods. And they increase the milage to get around the "revenue neutral" thing.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
We have a law that says reassessments have to be revenue neutral. If the average assessed value increases by 20% as in your example, the property tax is adjusted downward from the current 1% to 0.83% to maintain the same tax revenue.

PSU


----------------

Good program. In Texas, all the politicians pound their chest about holding the taxes rates the same as last year or their generosity in reducing the tax rate a few tenths of a percent.

Unsaid of course is that appraisal creep provides a reliable built in, and significant, increase in tax revenue year over year. Weasels, all.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I responded other. I use Quicken for all of our finances so running a report on the past 12 months spend is easy. Of course, everyone probably categorizes their income and expenses a little differently, but here are the past 12 months Top 10 for us:

Dining Out = 11,745
Vacations = 9,800
Household (new furniture and other small expenses) = 9,400
Real Estate Tax (MA) = 9,300
Utilities (Oil, Electricity, Cable, Mobile Phone) = 9,140
Wife's Payroll Taxes = 5,844
Groceries = 5,615
Misc Expenses (Largest Expense = Liquor) = 3,650
Home/Auto/Umbrella Insurance = 3,198
Medical (Insurance Premiums and Deductibles) = 2,119

I guess I need to cut down on the dining out and drinking at home with friends ;-)

'38Packard
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No. of Recommendations: 5
'38Packard: Real Estate Tax (MA) = 9,300, ... Wife's Payroll Taxes = 5,844

Apparently Big Hairy Mike's taxes in Texas are much higher than yours in MA. When I was in Massachusetts, we called it, "Taxachusetts".

Texas has no income tax so the state is financed by sales taxes and real estate taxes. Both are high. But they don't hit the precious billionaires very hard,compared to the lower income folks.

CNC
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Apparently Big Hairy Mike's taxes in Texas are much higher than yours in MA. When I was in Massachusetts, we called it, "Taxachusetts".

Texas has no income tax so the state is financed by sales taxes and real estate taxes. Both are high. But they don't hit the precious billionaires very hard,compared to the lower income folks.

CNC


----------------

Missing from 38P's expense list was federal taxes. Maybe his are really zero but that is the major difference between his taxes and mine.
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When I was in Massachusetts, we called it, "Taxachusetts".

Ohh, it's still called Taxachusetts! It's just that I'm now retired and DW brings home the "bacon bits and benefits" - she works for a local college and makes hardly anything in pay. But at least she can get employer sponsored health insurance and 401K match up to 8%. She has another year before she hits 65 and can join me in retirement.

But to answer your question, our tax liability for 2021 was:

Federal = 1,859
State = 1,405
TOTAL = 3,264

That puts total taxes just between Miscellaneous Expenses and Home/Auto/Umbrella Insurance.

'38Packard
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Define "rich"

Not having to worry about money.

My hippie brother doesn't worry and his net worth is maybe $400k all tied up in his house. I don't worry and my net worth is into 8 figures (not counting the decimal point). We are both rich.

JLC
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Taxes was are highest expense by far when working and remains our highest expense now that we are retired. During our working years, since we were both self employed (and paid both sides of FICA, etc.) and had high incomes plus state income tax, income taxes alone took roughly 50%. We are now down in the 25% range on income taxes. I won't mention gross numbers but they were/are higher than numbers currently being tossed around here. Yes, a good problem to have.

Outside of that, probably entertainment is our biggest expense. Season sports tickets, concerts, etc., and you won't find us in the nose bleed section. When Darius Rucker threw his guitar pick into the crowd a few years ago I caught it. DW and SIL wound up in the Twitter feed of The Goo Goo Dolls when they did a from behind performer shot showing the front row.

But not all self centered spending, our #2 expense until last year was each of us endowing a scholarship at our Alma Maters.

JLC
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No. of Recommendations: 6
Define "rich"

Not having to worry about money.

This can cut both ways, depending on the person. My first job was at a property management firm that had some wealthy clients. I grew to divide them into two categories: those who used their wealth to worry less about money, and those who used it to worry even more ("Now I have $100,000 worries instead of $1,000 worries").

I got a close look at that at an early age, which allowed me to make a conscious decision which group I wanted to fall in, should I be fortunate enough to get there.
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Good point. But Casa Poorfamily isn't a mansion, or even a McMansion. It's a decent size to be comfortable, but the taxes are only a few grand per year. We're actually the smallest house in our upscale neighborhood, as near as I can tell. A few of the others are almost manors, but a lot are similar to ours, just bigger. RV garages are popular here.

Property taxes have been almost invisible to me because that's part of the mortgage. A year from now I'll be more aware because the mortgage will go away.

1poorguy
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Taxes
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As has been point out in this thread, you are a lucky dog.
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Golfing expenses.

JimA
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For the win!
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Food and Food and then there's something to eat.
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I was including property taxes into "housing" and therefore indicated "housing" as our biggest expense. Ex-taxes, it's not. Taxes of all kinds--property, income (state and federal), sales--clearly is. Our plan was for travel to be our biggest expense in retirement, but the coronavirus has had a different idea about that.
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"I was including property taxes into "housing" and therefore indicated "housing" as our biggest expense. Ex-taxes, it's not. Taxes of all kinds--property, income (state and federal), sales"

Clearly it depends on how granularly you categorize. My golf expenses are the costs of equipment and the rounds of golf and the entry fees to tournaments. If I also included travel expenses such as gas and hotels and food on the road, then 'golf expenses' are considerably more than taxes, food, housing or other category you might dream up.

Life is good!

JimA
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Golfing expenses.

Golf is actually one of my lowest expenses and I play three times a week. It helps to be a marshal one morning a week. Saved me a boatload of green fees since 2004.

Regards,

ImAGolfer (retired '03)
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"Golf is actually one of my lowest expenses and I play three times a week. It helps to be a marshal one morning a week. Saved me a boatload of green fees since 2004.
Regards,
ImAGolfer (retired '03)"


I understand - but I play some 30 plus tournament rounds a year all over the US. My registration fees alone are over $5,000/yr. Additionally, I don't belong to a club as I don't want to feel obligated to play the same course day after day. I aim for 50 new courses every year; one year it was 85 new courses.

JimA
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No. of Recommendations: 16
women are my biggest expense....i retired single and date a lot....
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No. of Recommendations: 13
women are my biggest expense....i retired single and date a lot....

If you’re buying new, then yeah, expensive. I hear used ones are cheaper. Just sayin’
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women are my biggest expense....i retired single and date a lot....
...
If you’re buying new, then yeah, expensive. I hear used ones are cheaper. Just sayin’


Or maybe you should stop leasing and make a commitment!

IP
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No. of Recommendations: 11
>>women are my biggest expense....i retired single and date a lot....
...
If you’re buying new, then yeah, expensive. I hear used ones are cheaper. Just sayin’<<

Or maybe you should stop leasing and make a commitment!

IP


-----------------

LOL. We need intercst to chime in here with his pithy lease vs buy insights. <g>
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No. of Recommendations: 10
women are my biggest expense....i retired single and date a lot....

Goofyhoofy: If you’re buying new, then yeah, expensive. I hear used ones are cheaper. Just sayin’


Not according to Johnny Carson. He once did a magic trick upon request from a guest, a twelve year old mathematics wunderkind. To the delight of the boy, Johnny made a quarter "disappear."

The kid thought for a moment, then said, "But you didn't REALLY make it disappear, did you. Can you make it REALLY disappear?"

"You want to know how to make money REALLY disappear, kid, I'll tell you. Get married."
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< K2 is critical in getting calcium out of the soft tissues and into the bone. Over the counter lost cost product. Anyone who consumes calcium or takes supplements should be taking it. You want that calcium getting to the bones, not causing calcification of the arteries.>

I read about this several years ago. I took K2 supplements for months (two different manufacturers, both highly rated by customers on Amazon.com).

I stopped taking the supplements because I felt really bad all over. Achy, tired and weak. This went away when I stopped the supplements.

I don't know if this is an individual reaction or why it happened.

I also stopped taking calcium supplements when a large study showed that it didn't reduce osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and kidney stones.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276611/

I now eat a large bowl of kale every day for K2. Yogurt and vegetables for calcium. Vitamin D, 5000 I.U. per day when I don't get sun. One teaspoon of Milk of Magnesia per day. Lite Salt (50% NaCl, 50% KCl) instead of regular table salt. Plus an "Adult Multivitamin" for assorted nutrients (selenium, iodine, B vitamins, etc.)

To keep this on-topic.
Our biggest expense in retirement is taxes. Followed by insurance, although the health insurance is dramatically lower since we have been on Medicare.

Wendy
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<"You want to know how to make money REALLY disappear, kid, I'll tell you. Get married." >

Ha, ha.
A middle-aged guy cracked that "joke" in front of us about 30 years ago. I turned to DH and said, "Say, sweetheart, maybe I should quit my job so you can support me."

The humorist gulped.

Wendy
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In NJ, we had the story of a real estate lady who was murdered by her husband. He beat her to death with a pipe wrench while she was sleeping.

She was making good money in real estate. She wanted him to get a job and decided he had to go. He was quite unhappy about it. Died in prison.
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I now eat a large bowl of kale every day for K2.

watch those oxalates. jes saying
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No. of Recommendations: 12
I now eat a large bowl of kale every day for K2.

I've eaten kale.

I'd rather die 5 years earlier than eat kale every day. I'd actually call that a good trade.

--Peter <== really doesn't like kale.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
"women are my biggest expense....i retired single and date a lot.... "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

People generally need to interact with other people for their own health and happiness. The
main problem is developing a degree of trust in the other person. This also holds true in
marriage - though the issue tends to begun maintaining that trust.
I don't think there is of necessity any expense differences between married life and single
life. You have individuals and some want to do things that cost more or less money.

Howie52
Things tend to be a matter of individual people and how or why they interact.
Money tends to be used as a cure for problems. But the disease is sometimes more resistant than
the cure supposes.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
You need to find a GF like this.

‘I’m a man of simple pleasures’: I live with my girlfriend, 59, who owns several homes and has saved $3 million. I pay utilities and cable, and do repairs. Is that enough?
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/im-a-man-of-simple-pleasur...

</snip>


intercst
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No. of Recommendations: 24
I'd rather die 5 years earlier than eat kale every day. I'd actually call that a good trade.


I've heard that the trick is all in how you prepare it.
Use plenty of extra virgin olive oil...this allows it to slide off your plate into the trash bin much easier.

Mike
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Or maybe you should stop leasing and make a commitment!

If it flies, floats, or...has sex, it is cheaper to rent.
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Or maybe you should stop leasing and make a commitment!

If it flies, floats, or...has sex, it is cheaper to rent.

Correct...............
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1poorlady sometimes puts kale in soups. Completely hides the taste. As long as it's shredded a bit, I hardly notice.

But just leaves on a plate? Yuck. Lettuce, arugula, spinach, kale...I'll pass. That's what food eats.

1poorguy
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I stopped taking the supplements because I felt really bad all over. Achy, tired and weak. This went away when I stopped the supplements.

I don't know if this is an individual reaction or why it happened.

I also stopped taking calcium supplements when a large study showed that it didn't reduce osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and kidney stones.


Which is because of a need for K2 to get that calcium out of the soft tissue and into the bone. Sis has osteoporosis. Was put on calcium and it did not help the bone density until she added K2 to the supplement. A Calcium test showed her heart was looking bad also and that too reversed with the K2. I have been taking it for a couple of years now and have never had any issues with K2.

I now eat a large bowl of kale every day for K2.

Sadly, produce these days tends to be very deficient in nutrients as we deplete the soil. Though eating well and exercising is the best first defense against poor health, modern day farming provides us with produce that is much lower in nutrients that previously.

IP
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Kale just has a good PR firm.

Romaine lettuce has a VERY similar nutritional profile to kale and is much tastier. Kale’s got more protein, but unless you’re a vegan, you probably don’t need to worry about that.

(I’ll eat kale if I must, but can’t say I like it).
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It looks like I am in the minority. I really like kale. In fact I like just about all veggies. The exceptions are beets and chard. The geosmin in them give them a dirt like taste that I do not like.
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Wendy: Ha, ha.
A middle-aged guy cracked that "joke" in front of us about 30 years ago. I turned to DH and said, "Say, sweetheart, maybe I should quit my job so you can support me."

The humorist gulped.


Gulp.

Should have added "Present company excluded."
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Now I know why people look at me funny when I recommend kale salad at Blue Mountain Brewery.
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Don’t get me wrong. I like a lot of vegetables. One of my favorites is another commonly despised one, Brussels sprouts.

Just not kale. I will eat it in a mixed salad. Sometimes. My main objection is it eating it every day. There are so many other foods around that taste better and are still good for you.

—Peter
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"1poorlady sometimes puts kale in soups. Completely hides the taste. As long as it's shredded a bit, I hardly notice.

But just leaves on a plate? Yuck. Lettuce, arugula, spinach, kale...I'll pass. That's what food eats.

1poorguy "

***********************************************************************

My grandmother used to fix kale and potatoes together. Course she grew kale and potatoes.

Howie52
As I recall she used to add ketchup to the dish when she served herself.
The moral of this story is that you can make the healthiest food unhealthy in how you serve
the dish.
A second moral is that ketchup can hide the nastiest tastes.
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Another lesson is ketchup is loaded with sugar or high fructose corn syrup. About 25% carbs by wt.

A terrible choice for diabetics.

Sugar free is available but you have to search for it.
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At this point it looks like kale is everyone's biggest expense in retirement. Weird!!!
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I think the answer depends on how you define housing, even if taxes was an option.

For sake of the options offered, for housing, I would include my real estate tax, homeowners insurance, utilities, HOA fee, and either your rent or mortgage payment if you have one. One could also include lawn care, exterminator, and any cleaning service if you have one. In my case this would be #1 with a bit of an edge over taxes (not real estate), vacations, contributions and medical, any one of which could be #2 based on the year.
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"Another lesson is ketchup is loaded with sugar or high fructose corn syrup. About 25% carbs by wt.

A terrible choice for diabetics.

Sugar free is available but you have to search for it."

***************************************************************

The price for eating kale?

Howie52
As I said, there are always ways to make healthy foods unhealthy.

Visa versa?
Not so much.

Sugar frosted kale ----- yum.
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At this point it looks like kale is everyone's biggest expense in retirement. Weird!!!


Not everyone. Apparently you missed the women detour.

Then again, one of them could have been called "Kale" ;)
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Expenses

Federal income tax

Housing and real estate tax ($4000 tax, $1700 insurance, $10K upkeep (utilities, maintenance, lawn service , cleaning lady, pool service - and repairs). (Doesn't include the imputed cost of a $450,000 paid for house) - ie, if you had that money in the market returning 11%/yr....you're out tens of thousands of bucks a year.....minus rental costs....

Medicare supplement and drug plan

Eating out and food......

Charity donations....

t.
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