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No. of Recommendations: 1
What fuel will your next car/truck/SUV use?
Gasoline/Diesel
Hybrid
Electric
I do not know right now
I will not purchase a new car/truck/SUV

Click here to see results so far.

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No. of Recommendations: 2
It depends.

If my old car dies, I might replace it with a bright shiny new car. I might not replace it at all.

If my cowboy Cadillac dies, I might not replace it, and rent a car for vacations as that is what I use it for, or I might replace it with a bright shiny new electric car.

Right now I expect both to be doing their jobs well right through 2025 when I expect that electric cars will have lower sticker prices than gasoline powered cars. After that, if I replace a car it will must likely be electric.

Cheers
Qazulight
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Right now I expect both to be doing their jobs well right through 2025 when I expect that electric cars will have lower sticker prices than gasoline powered cars. After that, if I replace a car it will must likely be electric.


My little Micra spends very little time out of our underground parking. The type of driving I do would fit electric perfectly ... except that there is no practical place to charge it. The few plugs we have in the garage where intended only for the vacuum cleaner to reach, not to have every one of our 50 slots to have their own plug.

I tried to talk the board into it but the widow gang won't hear of spending money on such things and I suppose we live in a democracy of sorts?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7YMJKX52NE

Which Country is the Most Democratic? - TLDR News
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Right now I expect both to be doing their jobs well right through 2025 when I expect that electric cars will have lower sticker prices than gasoline powered cars. After that, if I replace a car it will must likely be electric.

Now you know why I'm loading up on TSLA! Tesla is the only car maker mass producing EVs on three continents and not encumbered by the dying fossil fuel machines.


After that, if I replace a car it will must [most?] likely be electric.

Freudian slip?


The Captain
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I'm in a remote area and I need a workhorse. I should probably go diesel but the lack of fuel and mechanics in some of my travels will probably make gas my choice. I currently have 2 vehicles to fill my needs and will buy one to replace them both when the one with 340K miles quits. So far it shows no signs of doing so but the paint is getting ratty.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I bought a Subaru Impreza in 2017 because it was said to be one of the safest, most reliable, longest-lived cars on the market. I expect it to go at least 300,000 miles which will be far more than I will ever drive in my lifetime.

Wendy (age 67, mostly small-town driving at 30 mph)
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I made that choice last year by buying a gasoline SUV. There were no EVs at the time that fit my needs. Now in 10-15 years, I'll consider an EV if available.

PSU
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No. of Recommendations: 6
I had intended to replace my Civic Hybrid last year with a Prius Prime, but COVID got in the way of shopping, and despite having 200k miles, it's been beautifully reliable. I'm an almost perfect use case for the Prime... daily commute is about 20 miles round trip, but (in normal times) it's not unheard of for me to take trips out-of-market for work (250-300 miles rt for the two offices I visit most often), so it's EV as a daily, but seamless switch to gas on longer trips. The hassle with going pure EV is that charging stations, while becoming more common, still aren't around every other street corner like gasoline. That'll probably change within the next 10 years or so, but we're not quite there yet.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
If my cowboy Cadillac dies, I might not replace it, and rent a car for vacations as that is what I use it for, or I might replace it with a bright shiny new electric car.

Qazulight,

I have been keen to order a 2022 Ford Maverick hybrid 40 MPG compact pickup, which ticks all the boxes for me except that DW forbids me to get it. She associates pickup trucks with rednecks and won't be seen in one except under duress.

The following links show the appealing Maverick Hybrid:

https://www.thedrive.com/news/41153/compact-2022-ford-maveri...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1j6QYW0MnNE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-HtjRUC-rM&ab_channel=S...

My second choice would be one of the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid or Toyota Sienna Hybrid minivans, both of which also offer great versatility and fuel mileage. Due to my mobility limitations, a minivan would be much easier for me to hobble into than the Maverick pickup. Unfortunately, as with the appealing hybrid Maverick pickup, DW forbids me to purchase a minivan. She associates minivans with soccer moms and elderly people with less than refined aesthetic taste.

I am only interested in hybrid vehicles, since they assuage my range anxiety while making me feel like a responsible global citizen.

If Ford sells as many of the new Maverick hybrid pickup trucks as I think they will (especially at a pricetag starting at $19,995), we may see a trend away from high performance internal combustion engines toward more hybrid powertrains.

Toyota's Sienna minivan is only available in hybrid. They (Toyota) have certainly perfected the hybrid concept in the Prius over the last 15 years or so. With improved battery technology, it seems that we should be seeing hybrids in more body styles, with greater utility.

As the size of batteries has shrunk, regenerative braking and small internal combustion engines all ought to fit nicely into almost any kind of vehicle. The Maverick pickup, Chrysler Pacifica, and Sienna minivan all demonstrate that practicality has a name - especially in the USA.

The name of practicality in US "flyover country" is hybrid.

;-)
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No. of Recommendations: 6
I’m looking at the Chrysler Pacifica van as a replacement for my Home Depot van, a 2005 Toyota Sienna and well used.

For any vehicle I would only consider a PHEV; most trips would be accomplished by electrons (which I hope to recharge using solar panels) but having gas available for journeys longer than 35 miles would be a must.

I wish the poll had broken down the difference between “hybrids” using gas to electric, and hybrids using electric first, then gas as a supplement.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
The name of practicality in US "flyover country" is hybrid.

Yup. While I mostly putz around town, in the summer I take road trips of 200-400 miles in a day. An electric that can't make that, with a/c, stereo, and, at least part way with lights on, is a no-go.

My VW is 7 years old. As I am paranoid about taking an old, high mile, car on frequent long trips, I'll probably be looking for a replacement in 3-5 years. Honda is promising a new gen Civic hatchback for the generation to be introduced next year, so that is my most probable buy.

Steve
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No. of Recommendations: 3
I voted electric, and my most likely pick right now is a used Chevy Bolt: affordable, efficient, practical, and useful range of ~200 miles. Also will consider used second generation Nissan LEAFs, but I'm a bit leery of their battery longevity.

I'll also look at used Toyota Prius Primes and at least give a quick study of options and costs for a new Prius Prime or RAV4 Prime, since they're eligible for federal tax credits.

And finally I will give some thought to a plain old used Prius hybrid ... which is what I'll be replacing. Super car.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
SIL bought daughter a Hybrid Range Rover this morning to replace her well used 11 year old Toyota Highlander. We haven't seen it yet as she's not getting it until next week. He brought her a total of six different cars to test drive over the past few days and she decided on the Range Rover. No idea why. I don't even know which model she's getting.

Tim

https://www.landrover.ca/en/families/range-rover.html?&C...
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No. of Recommendations: 0
I bought a Subaru Impreza in 2017 because it was said to be one of the safest, most reliable, longest-lived cars on the market. I expect it to go at least 300,000 miles which will be far more than I will ever drive in my lifetime.

=============================================================

Sounds reasonable, but what if in 2025 you have an accident (not your fault and you walk away unhurt) with a 3/4 ton pickup truck that piles into the back of your Subaru. Your car is so damaged that it is considered totaled. Then what type of car would you buy to replace it?

Jaak
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I made that choice last year by buying a gasoline SUV. There were no EVs at the time that fit my needs. Now in 10-15 years, I'll consider an EV if available.

PSU

================================================================

IMO you may only have a choice of a hybrid or EV. Gasoline SUV may not be available in 10-15 years.

Jaak
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No. of Recommendations: 1
The name of practicality in US "flyover country" is hybrid.

For now but not much longer. The AI in your EV can plan where to charge next.

The Captain
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No. of Recommendations: 1
My vehicle is a company car which I (pre-pandemic) use for generally longer trips across Europe. For my purpose, electric cars are still far away from being practical and I doubt that an electric car will be practical for this purpose any time in the next 10 years.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
We already have one Hybrid, a 2017 Toyota RAV4, and as our 2004 Toyota is approaching 300,000 miles we will be soon looking at another Hybrid.
We figured a Hybrid gives us the best of both worlds with good gas mileage and no worries about recharging.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
SIL bought daughter a Hybrid Range Rover this morning to replace her well used 11 year old Toyota Highlander... No idea why. I don't even know which model she's getting.

Tim,

I'm very happy for your daughter's good taste and your son-in-law's generosity. However, I strongly suspect that she would get better service and long-term reliability from Toyota's Highlander Hybrid than from the Rover.

Toyota has more experience and long-term success with hybrid vehicle technology than any other manufacturer in the world.

That said, the oddly angular styling and mass-market nature of the Toyota vehicles makes them less attractive to people who prefer the fashionable appeal and prestige of British and European brands. My DW is one of those people.

Highlander Hybrid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mw05QsbiM3Y

Range Rover P400e PHEV Hybrid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxXvJWldDh0&ab_channel=A...
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Toyota's Sienna minivan is only available in hybrid. They (Toyota) have certainly perfected the hybrid concept in the Prius over the last 15 years or so. With improved battery technology, it seems that we should be seeing hybrids in more body styles, with greater utility.

Good to know the Sienna comes in Hybrid now. We use our 2004 Sienna quite a bit, though not a fan of the low gas mileage. We are lucky to get 17 mpg. We have the all wheel drive version which also comes with the run flat tires rather than a spare, something I swore I would never do again. Are all the hybrids still just coming with a can of fix a flat for the spare? It's what stopped me from getting a hybrid in 2016 when we gave our old car to our college student and bought a new to us Camry as an upgrade.

It's crazy what we can fit in the Sienna, from moving to kayaking, but those run flat tires are crazy expensive!

IP
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I'm very happy for your daughter's good taste and your son-in-law's generosity. However, I strongly suspect that she would get better service and long-term reliability from Toyota's Highlander Hybrid than from the Rover.

Perhaps you are under the mistaken impression that she asked me? 😁

She did comment that the Highlander was ugly and vicious looking?

We found out about this when we arrived at their place yesterday afternoon for a visit before heading off to "the Wag"*** with the four of them (2 granddaughters 13 and 10) and both sets of grand parents for Father's day dinner.

*** - https://waegwoltic.ca/

Place reminds me of the movie Dirty Dancing but with lots of yachts and it is right in the city. Food and service were fabulous.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Our Hybrid Toyota RAV came with a "compact" spare but a full size spare was an option. I also carry an emergency kit that came free with a set of Michelins I purchased. It includes a small air compressor and a tire repair kit.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Just bought a 2021 gas Telluride for my retirement. My next car purchase would be an electric car IF I buy one. I suspect by 2030 Uber or some type of shared (elec)ownership vehicle will meet my needs.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Our Hybrid Toyota RAV came with a "compact" spare but a full size spare was an option. I also carry an emergency kit that came free with a set of Michelins I purchased. It includes a small air compressor and a tire repair kit.

That's one of the things I found really attractive about the new Maverick Hybrid Pickup - it comes with a compact spare mounted under the bed, with an optional full size spare under the cargo bed.

Everyone I know who has owned a car with "run flats" eventually complains about the crazy cost of new tires. So far, I have been able to avoid purchasing a vehicle without "normal" tires and at least a compact spare.

Given the inevitability of damaged, worn-out, or flat tires, I'm surprised more people don't insist on only purchasing a vehicle with normal tires and at least a compact spare. If no one bought cars with run flats, manufacturers would soon get the message.

I can understand run flats on tiny sports cars or exotics (Corvette, Ferrari, Lamborghini, etc.), where a spare tire is impossible. However, now that batteries have shrunk in size, even hybrid vehicles can be equipped with mini spares. There's no excuse for designing a conventional sedan, SUV, or luxury car equipped only with run flats, without an option for normal tires and a real spare.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
SIL bought daughter a Hybrid Range Rover this morning

I was at a car show yesterday and noticed, off by itself, was a tent for the Society of Automotive Engineers trying to recruit college bound students to enter engineering. Two of the three guys there were Brits. Of course, the discussion wandered around to "the prince of darkness, Joseph Lucas". I countered that anyone who ever owned a French car, like I had, is equally familiar with Ducellier, Marchal and Paris Rhone, and anyone who had an Italian car has equal familiarity with Marelli. I suggested that VW managed to survive in the US, while all the other makes failed, because Robert Bosch electrics are just enough better than the rest of the EU product to make them acceptable here.

I also got into a spirited discussion with the one USian in the booth over James Nance. I hold Nance was an idiot and offered evidence to support my case....but that is another story.

Getting back to the point, given the reputation for UK electrics, I can't think of anything more problematic than a Landy with even more electrics for a hybrid powertrain. ;^)

Steve
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Tesla is the only car maker mass producing EVs on three continents and not encumbered by the dying fossil fuel machines.

Bought a brand new 2018 Lincoln Navigator gasoline powered, so not in the market anytime soon. The way I take care and maintain cars I expect my next purchase to be in about 12-15 years or longer depending on technology advancements.

When I bought my new 2004 Honda Pilot, I considered the Toyota Highlander because it had a hybrid option. Did the math, and for my driving habits, gas would need to stay about $4/gal to be beneficial. I am surprised that their are not more hybrid options today, especially in bigger SUVs but I guess everyone is trying to build an EV.

What I would hope for my next purchase: large SUV hybrid with some AI driving capabilities. Why hybrid? Don't think the battery range (i.e. approaching 500 miles) will be there nor will the fast charging stations to make travel/road trips comparable to today.

JLC
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No. of Recommendations: 0
My vehicle is a company car which I (pre-pandemic) use for generally longer trips across Europe. For my purpose, electric cars are still far away from being practical and I doubt that an electric car will be practical for this purpose any time in the next 10 years.

========================================================

Will your company change their policy about ICE vehicles. Maybe your company is linked to the petroleum industry.

If it was your personal car, what is holding up your use of hybrid or EV cars? Is it the lack of charging stations?
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Will your company change their policy about ICE vehicles. Maybe your company is linked to the petroleum industry.

Sure, there must be nefarious reasons.

PSU
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I just bought a Subaru Forester in 2019. It fits the bill perfectly for me right now. I live in an urban area, but like to take trips to the snow every so often, and our extended family seems to have settled on Subaru as the brand of choice over the past decade or so.

My plan is to keep the Forester for 5 years and then pass it down to one of the kidlets. Its replacement will be electric, probably some flavor of Tesla. That will fit my needs.

I've waited my whole life to have an opportunity to stick it to the fossil fuel industry. (What goes around, comes around). That makes me happy.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
I've waited my whole life to have an opportunity to stick it to the fossil fuel industry.

Not going to be as easy as one thinks. There are thousands of everyday items derived from petroleum although, IIRC, about 40-50% is used for gasoline.

https://whgbetc.com/petro-products.pdf

JLC
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Not going to be as easy as one thinks. There are thousands of everyday items derived from petroleum although, IIRC, about 40-50% is used for gasoline.

I was amazed to discover that artificial vanilla flavoring is made from petroleum. After we kill petroleum we'll have to kill orchids again to get real vanilla flavoring.

The Captain
Venezuela has over 20,000 kinds of orchids...
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No. of Recommendations: 8
I've waited my whole life to have an opportunity to stick it to the fossil fuel industry.

Why is that? Have they not provided useful products? The world has benefited greatly; fossil fuels have allowed billions of people to avoid spending all their days staring at the rear end of a horse/ox/water buffalo.

DB2
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Why is that? Have they not provided useful products? The world has benefited greatly; fossil fuels have allowed billions of people to avoid spending all their days staring at the rear end of a horse/ox/water buffalo.

====================================================

Fossil fuels provided too much cheap useful energy, but with massive unsustainable side effects around the world:

Population explosion
Pollution explosion
Destruction of environments
Climate change

Now the world realizes the folly of using too much fossil fuel and is engaged in stopping the use of fossil fuels.

Jaak
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No. of Recommendations: 1
There are thousands of everyday items derived from petroleum although, IIRC, about 40-50% is used for gasoline.

====================================================

In 2020 US petroleum was used 68% for transportation and 32% for industrial, commercial and residential.

https://flowcharts.llnl.gov/content/assets/images/energy/us/...

Jaak
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No. of Recommendations: 1
There are too many examples of items that can be replaced with sustainably sourced materials to be listed here. The obvious ones are glass bottles instead of plastic, foam packing materials from corn starch, paper bags instead of plastic, etc,.

What the petroleum industry did was make plastic cheap to make and cheap to use and the hell with end of product life disposal. Let the next guy worry about getting rid of the cr$$ and now we are literally swimming in it.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
paper bags instead of plastic, etc,.

Not too long ago I used a paper grocery bag to save the planet. On the way home it started to rain and soon my groceries were all over the sidewalk as the wet bag burst. I have not saved the planet since insisting on safer, waterproof plastic bags.

Then on the Fool's Health and Nutrition board I discovered how unsanitary it was to reuse plastic grocery bags full of unsanitary bugs.

We are DOOMED! DOOMED!

The Captain
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No. of Recommendations: 4
paper bags instead of plastic, etc

Its seems the UK government published a study back in 2011 on the environmental impacts of different types of bags for groceries -- paper, light-weight plastic, heavy plastic, etc.

Life cycle assessment of supermarket carrier bags
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/...

Taking into account the land, water, energy and carbon emissions required in their manufacture, the Environment Agency concluded that a paper bag would have to be used three times before it could be regarded as more environmentally correct than a lightweight plastic bag used only once. In fact about 40% plastic bags are typically reused as trash can liners. On that basis, said the report, a cotton bag would have to be used 173 times before its global warming potential dropped below that of a flimsy plastic bag.

DB2
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No. of Recommendations: 2
etc,.

Not too long ago I used a paper grocery bag to save the planet. On the way home it started to rain and soon my groceries were all over the sidewalk as the wet bag burst. I have not saved the planet since insisting on safer, waterproof plastic bags.

Then on the Fool's Health and Nutrition board I discovered how unsanitary it was to reuse plastic grocery bags full of unsanitary bugs.

We are DOOMED! DOOMED!

The Captain

_________________

We won’t make it out alive!!!!

Everything we have accomplished has been for naught, we are destroying the planet and each other in the process. We should just stay home, walk or bicycle and grow our own food and cook over a wood burning fire outside, but wait, using that wood is destroying the forests and the smoke from the fire is harmful to the planet. What should we do? Forage for natural food like the creatures do?

We had have close to 16 months of a shut down and what do you see? People jetting everywhere and driving to see people, places and things. I’m sure this includes a lot of liberals with lots of spending money.

As a people, we grow, we adapt and we change. We don’t go backward. The all or nothing approach doesn’t work and people who advocate it have cemented themselves on their “high horses”.
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We had have close to 16 months of a shut down and what do you see? People jetting everywhere and driving to see people, places and things.

And over 10 years a 0.1% change.

Global fossil fuel use similar to decade ago in energy mix
www.reuters.com/business/environment/global-fossil-fuel-use-...
The share of fossil fuels in the world's total energy mix is as high as a decade ago, despite the falling cost of renewables and pressure on governments to act on climate change, a report by green energy policy network REN21 showed on Tuesday....

REN21 said the share of fossil fuels in the global energy mix was 80.2% in 2019, compared to 80.3% in 2009, while renewables such as wind and solar made up 11.2% of the energy mix in 2019 and 8.7% in 2009, the report said. The rest of the energy mix comprises traditional biomass, used largely to cook or heat homes in developing countries.

DB2
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Right now, there are no electric vehicles available that are suitable to carry a wheelchair passenger. So even though I would happily consider an electric or hybrid vehicle, none fit my needs.

—Peter
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No. of Recommendations: 1
There are too many examples of items that can be replaced with sustainably sourced materials to be listed here. The obvious ones are glass bottles instead of plastic...

Everything has its place. You will only drop a glass bottle once.

JLC
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No. of Recommendations: 1
My intention is to buy a hybrid vehicle, probably a Toyota Prius, when my IC Toyota Camry station wagon croaks.

Though yesterday I ran across the 2022 Ford Maverick hybrid pickup that has peaked my interest.
https://www.motortrend.com/cars/ford/maverick/2022/2022-ford...
1,500-pound payload, 4,000-pound max towing capacity, and DIY-ready 4.5-foot bed don't catch your eye, its standard hybrid powertrain with up to 40 mpg or starting price of just $21,490 ought to make you think twice.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
Everything has its place.

The problem with plastic is it won't stay in its place and is now found in polar ice, and on the beaches of the Micronesian Atolls. Chances are if you eat any seafood you are also ingesting microbeads made of plastic. How yummy!
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It also has a locking position tailgate that allows you to carry 14 full size sheets of plywood over the wheel wells.
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Right now, there are no electric vehicles available that are suitable to carry a wheelchair passenger. So even though I would happily consider an electric or hybrid vehicle, none fit my needs.

====================================================================================

Your only option is going with a conversion:

Wheelchair-Accessible 2021 Toyota Sienna Hybrid Conversion

https://www.freedommotors.com/toyota-sienna-hybrid-wheelchai...

Jaak
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Ever been to Glass Beach in California. Beautiful scenery, especially for a former trash dump.

https://www.travelawaits.com/2472214/glass-beach-california-...

JLC
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No. of Recommendations: 0
...before its global warming potential dropped below that of a flimsy plastic bag.

Global warming potential is something to consider but what about nutritional value?

I mean if we are going to be consuming plastics in our diet we SHOULD know what the nutrients are that are contained in PVC's, polyester's, etc.
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And over 10 years a 0.1% change.

And what has the world population growth been prepandemic? Taking that into account even if energy usage stayed the same we are ahead of the game as per-capita use has dropped.

You have to start somewhere.
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And over 10 years a 0.1% change.
---
And what has the world population growth been prepandemic? Taking that into account even if energy usage stayed the same we are ahead of the game as per-capita use has dropped.


It was, if I read it correctly, a 0.1% drop of the total energy mix rather than an absolute 0.1% drop.

You have to start somewhere.

I was reminded of Through the Looking Glass where Alice finds herself running faster and faster to stay in place.

"A slow sort of country!" said the Queen. "Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!"

DB2
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I don't know. I purchased a gasoline powered Kia Forte last year, after hearing some worrying things about my old car when I took it in for maintenance.
The fact is, I was considering electric BUT the infrastructure is not here for it to be charged. Not (as far as I know) near my job. Not in the neighborhood. And the garage here - we would have to have it installed.
I am not totally wild about the situation, but the Hyundai was also getting crummy mileage (the Kia has gotten 43 mpg on occasion).
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The fact is, I was considering electric BUT the infrastructure is not here for it to be charged. Not (as far as I know) near my job. Not in the neighborhood. And the garage here - we would have to have it installed.

I am not totally wild about the situation, but the Hyundai was also getting crummy mileage (the Kia has gotten 43 mpg on occasion).

===============================================================

I agree that outside CA the charging stations are few and far between. Hopefully the infrastructure bill gets passed and thousands of charging stations are built quickly all over the country.

Glad you found a good high mpg car to carry you into the EV future.
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I was also waiting for the range on some of those electric cars to get better. It seems to be improving, but when it comes to the less expensive models they aren't to the point where I would feel confident about making a day trip to Chicago in cold weather.
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