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Yesterday, son & daughter-in-law were packing their truck for a week-long getaway, when *crash* their fully loaded wall-mounted pot rack pulled out of the wall and landed on the kitchen floor. DS had mounted it using toggles, so the connection was fine, but the drywall failed. It had held for over 3 years, but as time went on and they added more and more pots, it go to be too much.

So, my project for this week: re-mount. Ideally, I'd run blocking between the studs, behind the drywall, but that's too much work. Instead, I'll add wood to the face of the wall, probably 1x4's, maybe oak. I'll paint it to match the wall, so it won't be too conspicuous, but it'll still stick out 3/4".
That might bother them a little bit, but it's a very old, small kitchen, and there are a lot of other things that bother them more.

Just buying time. They're talking about an addition, to expand the kitchen, but IMO they'd be better off just buying a bigger house. Eventually. Either way, the current kitchen is temporary.
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Of course mounting the rack so mounting screws go into the studs -- if possible -- would make it stronger. If not possible, your mounting block should work fine -- but again to hold weight, attach to the studs if you can.
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There's only one place the pot rack will fit, physically, and in that place the mounting screws do not align with studs. Hence the wood "transfer mount." I'm just hoping the wood can span 2 studs; if I hit a stud on only one side, that won't give me warm fuzzies. Will cross that bridge. First step (later today) will be to locate the studs.
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Can you mount it using more toggles? With 4x more toggles there is 1/4 the force at each attachment point. 2x would probably work since it held for years, but 4x gives a nice margin of error. Might be easier than adding wood and painting.
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You could also consider sheet metal or Plexiglas instead of wood. It would be thinner and less obvious. And could be decorated by covering with contact shelf paper as an alternative to painting.
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more toggles?

Not only is the wall drywall (not plaster), it's 1/4" drywall! I didn't even realize it came so thin, but there it is.

Also, given the geometry of the rack, similar to https://www.crateandbarrel.com/enclume-30-hammered-steel-gou...
the top two points are in maximum tension, regardless of supports I might add elsewhere. There are also 2 screws on the bottom, but those are just for shear, to keep the flat part from sliding down.
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I assume there are now four holes in the drywall where the toggles broke through. Using two 1x4's you have a choice of mounting them horizontally or vertically. Horizontal, one piece covering the upper holes and the other over the lower holes, may help you find a stud to hit.

If you can't hit a stud going horizontal, I would go vertical. One vertical board behind each side. You could make them significantly longer than the vertical span of the holes, attaching above, between and below the tear-out points. The longer you make them above the upper point of the rack, and fasten then to the wall up higher, the more the strain becomes sheer. I would be more inclined toward molly umbrella bolts than toggles; they contact the inside of the wall at four points. You may even want to consider also using adhesive to supplement the umbrella bolts. The lousy thin drywall is already so damaged that gluing the boards to the wall can't make it that much worse, and it can spread the load nicely.

https://www.theartofdoingstuff.com/the-only-drywall-anchor-y...
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Reminds me of my own incident, in 1982, we'd recently nought a new RX7, happily living in the garage under about 4 or 5 bicycles I had suspended on hooks screwed into a 2x4 on the ceiling. I thought Id hit ceiling joists when I put them up, but..

As DW went to leave for work in the RX7, she comes out into the garage to find all the bikes on top of the RX7! Whoa.. Evidently I had missed the ceiling joists.. I held them up as she drove out..and I had a new project.

This time, I used lag bolts into the joists ,and they are still up there today, but only one bike left..

Lesson learned, insurance covered the body work, repaint.
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I’m in luck. The studs are 16” on center and two of them are between the pot rack connection points, which are 21” apart.
So a horizontal 1x4 across the top can connect to two studs. The pot rack will in turn connect to the 1x4.
Another 1x4 across the bottom.

All wood screws, no toggles.
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Yep, I’ll probably glue the 1x4’s to the wall first, to hold them in place while I attach the screws.
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I used construction adhesive to attach the 1x4’s to the wall, and they slid a hair before I got the screws in, but that’s OK. The pilot holes where the pot rack will connect are plumb and level.
Tomorrow: clean and prime.
Tuesday or later: paint.
After that: get 4 new wood screws for the pot rack, and install that. Should be done before the weekend.
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