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This morning I heard an NPR reporter use the word "proved," and it didn't sound right. I thought she should have said "proven."

But then I realized that I wasn't clear on the difference between them.

Turns out there isn't one. The built-in dictionary in Mac OS X includes this usage note:

For complex historical reasons, prove developed two past participles: proved and proven. Both are correct and can be used more or less interchangeably:: this hasn't been proved yet; | this hasn't been proven yet. Proven is the more common form when used as an adjective before the noun it modifies: | a proven talent (not | a proved talent). Otherwise, the choice between | proved and | proven is not a matter of correctness, but usually of sound and rhythm—and often, consequently, a matter of familiarity, as in the legal idiom | innocent until proven guilty.<i/>
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If my memory (currently overloaded) still serves me, we had discussed this some time ago. So I guess you've proved the point that history tends to repeat itself, right?


sheila
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No. of Recommendations: 7
If my memory (currently overloaded) still serves me, we had discussed this some time ago.

Perhaps, but it can't be proven using the Fool's search function.

(It occurs to me that there's a reason it's called "Search" but not "Find.")
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(It occurs to me that there's a reason it's called "Search" but not "Find.")

So why is a certain menu item in a lot of Microsoft software called "Help"?
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So why is a certain menu item in a lot of Microsoft software called "Help"?

Ever hear of a Don't Panic button?
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