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I was curious to know if the SEC fees (in a taxable account) upon sale were proportional to the proceeds amount or a set dollar amount as with commissions. About how much are the fees, like say on $1K proceeds, just for example.
Correct me if wrong but generally then the 1099-B would report the proceeds net of commissions but still with the fees attached, so your real pocketed money would be slightly less than the sales price on your Sch. D, right?

And aside from the above question, if I hold a sharebuilder Roth containing ETFs and choose to sell one there would be a commission and fees too, but one wouldn't receive a 1099 unless taking a distribution, right?
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I was curious to know if the SEC fees (in a taxable account) upon sale were proportional to the proceeds amount or a set dollar amount as with commissions.

Neither. The fees are generally charged based on the number of shares. While they are styled 'SEC' fees, they are not imposed by the SEC. They are imposed by the exchanges, which are required to pay fees to the SEC based on share volume. The exchanges then pass the fees on to the brokers, who pass them on to the customers. To determine how your fees are calculated, you should contact your broker.

Here is some additional detail on SEC fees: http://www.sec.gov/answers/sec31.htm

AJ
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I was curious to know if the SEC fees (in a taxable account) upon sale were proportional to the proceeds amount or a set dollar amount as with commissions. About how much are the fees, like say on $1K proceeds, just for example.

Current fees charged by the SEC to the exchanges is .0169 cents per $1,000. The fee is based on dollar value, not number of shares.
http://www.sec.gov/news/press/2010/2010-29.htm

Correct me if wrong but generally then the 1099-B would report the proceeds net of commissions but still with the fees attached, so your real pocketed money would be slightly less than the sales price on your Sch. D, right?

No, the fees are netted out along with the commission.

And aside from the above question, if I hold a sharebuilder Roth containing ETFs and choose to sell one there would be a commission and fees too, but one wouldn't receive a 1099 unless taking a distribution, right?

Correct.

tr
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Current fees charged by the SEC to the exchanges is .0169 cents per $1,000.

That should read either $0.0169 or 1.69 cents per $1,000.
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Disconnect between SEC fees and what I'm being charged by Fidelity. Last big sale was in December. 800 shares with gross proceeds of $17,544.00. $10.95 Commission and 46 cents Activity Assessment Fee were deducted. The sale was before Fido reduced commissions to $7.95.

At $1.69/$1000 the SEC fee would be $29.65. I seriously doubt they are eating that much just to give me low commissions. They're great to work with but they aren't that nice.
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800 shares with gross proceeds of $17,544.00. $10.95 Commission and 46 cents Activity Assessment Fee were deducted. At $1.69/$1000 the SEC fee would be $29.65.

The correct computation would be $17,544/1000 x .0169 = .2965. However, in December the rate was .0257/$1,000. http://www.sec.gov/news/press/2009/2009-230.htm

By my calculation, Fidelity should have passed through a charge of 45 cents, or 46 cents if they always round up.
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