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As you may know, my DF was diganosed in Oct, 2002 and we are still trying to learn how to live with this. I always call him an ostrich because his tendency in dealing with difficult things is to bury his head in the sand.

Anywhoo, we were at a fourth of July thing yesterday and he disappeared. He came back a little later and said he had gotten sick and had to go home to yack (sorry if that's too graphic). Is this diabetes related?? I think it may have happened a few times before but he hasn't shared the details with me (ostrich). A lot of times I figure out his having sugar problems because of how he is acting, not because of what he is telling me. Any comments appreciated.
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Anywhoo, we were at a fourth of July thing yesterday and he disappeared. He came back a little later and said he had gotten sick and had to go home to yack (sorry if that's too graphic). Is this diabetes related?? I think it may have happened a few times before but he hasn't shared the details with me (ostrich). A lot of times I figure out his having sugar problems because of how he is acting, not because of what he is telling me. Any comments appreciated.

Probably not. If he was drinking, he may have just gotten sick.
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Well, actually, that's been one blessing in all this diabetes stuff. He leaves the drinking to me, and I leave the driving to him.

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Generally speaking, there are two immediate conditions a person with diabetes might encounter. The first is hypoglycemia, where blood sugars go through the roof. I am not sure of the symptoms, but I seem to recall severe fatigue as being one. The other is hyperglycemia, where blood sugars drop below 70. The body can go into shock and convulsions, leading to coma and death. For that reason, people with diabetes often carry something with some sugar in it (candy, etc) and have an identification bracelet with instructions for how to treat someone who goes into shock.

Of course, I could be completely wrong on this, as it is late and just got back from driving 300+ miles tonight. In short, if the vomitting was not due to drinking, it may have been from bad food. I had a home cooked burger yesterday and spent the evening on the john. On the positive side, I made some progress in my book. :-)
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>>...fourth of July thing yesterday and he disappeared. He came back a little later and said he had gotten sick and had to go home to yack (sorry if that's too graphic). Is this diabetes related??<<

First level answer...I'd be surprised if it was; doesn't match anything bg-level related I can think of (or I've felt due to). BUT....

when I 'disappear' at an event, my wife knows to suspect me of pigging out, someplace, on something I'm not supposed to be having, one way or another. (Almost half a century of being a true compulsive overeater just doesn't go away.....well, ever, actually; you just have to learn how to handle it....).
And I later have had, er, potty problems and such, related to what I pigged out on. Just a thought; but if he has any compulsions...eating, or drinking, or smoking...those are the first things I'd suspect someone who 'disappears' at an event is doing.

JP
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if he has any compulsions...eating, or drinking, or smoking...those are the first things I'd suspect

Oooh good point, and one I hadn't thought of. He is not a drinker or a smoker, but man does he love his food! I suppose he could be behaving where I can see him and then quietly going off and having what he wanted in private. Thanks for the pointer!
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Generally speaking, there are two immediate conditions a person with diabetes might encounter. The first is hypoglycemia, where blood sugars go through the roof. I am not sure of the symptoms, but I seem to recall severe fatigue as being one. The other is hyperglycemia, where blood sugars drop below 70. The body can go into shock and convulsions, leading to coma and death. For that reason, people with diabetes often carry something with some sugar in it (candy, etc) and have an identification bracelet with instructions for how to treat someone who goes into shock.

Just to correct a typo, hypoglycemia is low blood sugar and hyperglycemia is elevated blood sugars.

Hypoglycemia is dangerous and is much more likely to occur with insulin or sulfonylureas like Glucotrol, glyburide or Amaryl (though Amaryl is the best IMO). Metformin (Glucophage) and the glitazones (also called "TZD's"), Actos and Avandia rarely cause hypoglycemia.

A person's response to hyperglycemia is varied but can be nausea, vomiting, headache, fatigue, abdominal discomfort or nothing. Anyone with excessive thirst, urination and weight loss should be checked for diabetes.

ab
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I agree with the Doc.

Also, I've had HYPOglycemia for 20 years before developing diabetes. HYPOglycemia (lowBS) usually manifests as shakes or trembles. HYPERglycemia (highBS) seems to manifest as dizzies or staggering.
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