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The more needle crafts I do, the more I ask myself, what do I do with the needles when they get dull. And how do I track which ones have been used and are new once I open the package.

I won't throw just a needle away because I don't want it puncturing the trash bag and falling through to be eaten or stepped on. So I put them back in the container and then wonder about sharpness and the like.

So, How do you take care of your needles and dispose of them?

Trill
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dispose of them?

I usually wrap it in paper, sometimes (if it hasn't broken -- like sewing machine needles) "weaving" it in and out of the paper a couple of times so it doesn't slide through, then fold the paper so it's a little thicker and safer than just tossing a needle.

I try to keep the needles in the containers/wrappers they come in, sometimes stick a threaded needle into the threads of a spool, wrapping the longer tail around the needle to secure it.

I don't do enough sewing for needles to really get bad, but if a beading needle won't stay straight or go through the beads, I'll dump them.

~~ Alison
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Hi,

I just had a thought to add, too. I can't even hem very well, so that problem doesn't exist in my house, but what about an empty prescription bottle? Would those be large (long) enough? Peel the label off and maybe mark it that it contains needles (that looks good, doesn't it? *g*)--sewing needles, and that would keep them safe and they couldn't puncture the container, either.

Just a thought!

Pam
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That is actually a great idea, I get Allegra D, it comes in the big bottle.

I think I will mark it sewing stuff though.

Trill
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In the landscape architecture studio, we dump old sharps (exacto blades) in used pop cans. I guess that doesn't work if you are wanting to reuse them though - but I like the bottle idea.

--Hyacinthe
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I save old pill bottles for used needles. They can be tossed this way also.

Use a pincushion with "shot" on it & your needles are sharpened as you insert them.
Jan
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Use a pincushion with "shot" on it & your needles are sharpened as you insert them.

Shot? This sounds very interesting, what type of shot and where did you find the pin cushion?

Thanks,

Trill


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I don't know about "shot", but the little strawberry dangling from those red tomato looking pincushions, is filled with emery which is an abrasive (like on a nail emery board). If you stick the needle in there a few times, it's supposed to help keep it sharp.

Carol
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I don't know about "shot", but the little strawberry dangling from those red tomato looking pincushions, is filled with emery which is an abrasive (like on a nail emery board). If you stick the needle in there a few times, it's supposed to help keep it sharp.

Wow! I didn't know that! Every strawberry I've ever had got ripped off by Girlie who keeps them with her toy dishes for tea parties. I guess I'll have to "borrow" one or two back.

Uhura :o)
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what type of shot

I'm guessing it's kind of like buckshot. I've used it in a jewelry tumblers for polishing in a chain making class. After the metal is soldered, it gets dark and unevenly colored. The shot is in the water (soapy, I think) and the chain is put in and tumbled for a while. The bits of shot are different sizes and shapes, which means the particles can polish the pieces of chain, inside and out.

It's probably similar to what's in pincushions.

~~ Alison
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