Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 1
My wife and I are considering replacing my 1991 Chevy Lumina. For the past year we have been watching prices for the type of vehicle we are interested in. We have done this by checking online (KBB, edmund's and car selling websites), in the weekend paper, and in auto trader magazines. We think we have a decent idea for what the vehicle should cost. Anyway, we found a decent priced vehicle that met our specs online, corresponded with the online department at that dealer and then went to the dealer.

We got the stereotypical used car salesman. He wanted to talk all of the time, did not answer our questions to our satisfaction, tried to rush us inside to talk negotiate, wanted to know how much our monthly payment would be, etc. He also did not seem to know anything about the vehicle. I asked about any service that was done to the vehicle, wether it was a local trade-in, and how to get the jack out of the compartment. He did not know and did not seem interested in finding it for us.


Here is list Of questions I have about this.

1. Is it possible to ask for a new salesman to deal with? Or do we just not go back to that particular dealer?

2. The internet price was $2000 less than the window sticker price. Will the dealer still negotiate the interent price down some?

3. There were a few cosmetic defects, is it reasonable for me to ask them to fix them before I come back for a test drive?

4. We were going to take a test drive this weekend, but the form the salesman brought back for us to sign required that we have both collision and liability insurance. We only carry liability as our cars are worth so little. I called my insurance company and for $50 per 6 months, they can add collision coverage. Is it typical for a dealer to require test drivers to have collision insurance?

c
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
1. It is certainly reasonable to ask for another salesperson. Ask to speak with the General Sales Manger or Used Car Manager. If they aren't willing to work with you, take your business elsewhere. The guy you already worked with will probably get some of the commission if you buy the car.

2. In my experience, when the internet price is significantly lower than the window price, the internet price is firm. Doesn't hurt to ask though.

3. On the cosmetic stuff, if it were economical to fix them, they would probably be fixed. Again, it doesn't hurt to ask, but don't expect much. What specifically are you talking about?

4. The dealer certainly has insurance, but in case of a claim, your insurance will be primary. I think it is reasonable to ask for your insurance to cover any potential damage to their property. If this were your business what would you do?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
4. The dealer certainly has insurance, but in case of a claim, your insurance will be primary.

I haven't read the document the OP has been asked to sign. In my experience, the garage policy would generally be primary on owned vehicles and under personal auto policies, coverage on temporary substitute autos is invariably secondary - would pickup the difference in deductibles, for example, or pay a collision loss if no collision coverage were carried on the garage policy.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
1. Is it possible to ask for a new salesman to deal with? Or do we just not go back to that particular dealer?

Sure. Why spend a couple hours with someone who isn't providing you satisfactory service? Next time you call, ask for the sales manager, explain yourselves, and ask for a different representative.

2. The internet price was $2000 less than the window sticker price. Will the dealer still negotiate the interent price down some?

As Todd said, it is free to ask. Is the internet price fair? On what grounds would you justify a lower offer? Offer reasons for your proposal.

3. There were a few cosmetic defects, is it reasonable for me to ask them to fix them before I come back for a test drive?

Depends on the things you want looked at. If you're concerned about things like light scratches that might or might not buff out, or stains on carpet that might or might not come out, sure. If the issues are more substantial, raise them as concerns see how the sales manager responds.

4. We were going to take a test drive this weekend, but the form the salesman brought back for us to sign required that we have both collision and liability insurance. We only carry liability as our cars are worth so little. I called my insurance company and for $50 per 6 months, they can add collision coverage. Is it typical for a dealer to require test drivers to have collision insurance?

Laws about this vary considerably from state to state. In Illinois, where I work, our insurance is primary. If you wreck our car while test driving, your responsibility is theoretically limited to our deductible of $1000. I don't know of any customer ever paying for damage done to a car while test driving. It is our car, we gave you permission to drive it. I can think of a half-dozen cases over the years of customers damaging cars while on test drives. I can't think of a single time when the customer paid the first dime of repair expenses. Bottom line though it is is the dealership's car, and they can decide who can and cannot drive it. Explain your concern to the sales manager and tell him that you and your wife both have valid driver's licenses and liability insurance, and that if you can't drive the car you won't buy it.

Hope this helps a bit

Dean
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
{{2. In my experience, when the internet price is significantly lower than the window price, the internet price is firm. Doesn't hurt to ask though.}}


Thanks for that info. The salesman made it sound like it was negotiable, but only a little bit.



{{3. On the cosmetic stuff, if it were economical to fix them, they would probably be fixed. Again, it doesn't hurt to ask, but don't expect much. What specifically are you talking about?}}


There were 4 things that we notice.
1. White powder on the floor carpet. The salesman said it was due to the carpet shampooing.

2. The cigarette lighter was missing the ligheter or a cover.

3. The jack release mechanism was missing the handle

4. the weather stripping was loose on one of the windows. (This may be more than just a cosmetic thing)




((4. The dealer certainly has insurance, but in case of a claim, your insurance will be primary. I think it is reasonable to ask for your insurance to cover any potential damage to their property. If this were your business what would you do?}}


I called my insurance company and they said that they would be secondary and the dealer would be primary. the insurance rep said that she had never heard of this before. I understand why the dealer would require insurance. I just had not anticipated that being a problem before we went and planned to have a test drive.

Thanks for all of your help.



c
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
There were 4 things that we notice.
1. White powder on the floor carpet. The salesman said it was due to the carpet shampooing.

Then it'll vacuum right up. Ask for it to be corrected prior to your return/reinspection

2. The cigarette lighter was missing the ligheter or a cover.

Lots of times cigarette lighters that have seen heavy use get tossed. It is a tipoff that a car has been smoked in. And a lot of times people toss them because they don't want anyone smoking in their cars, or they use the outlet for a cell phone and don't want the lighter in the way. A dealerships detail dept will either keep a supply of new ones on hand, or steal one for you from one of the many other cars on the lot. We always figured as long as we had one more cigarette lighter then we always had one for the customer who wanted one.

3. The jack release mechanism was missing the handle.

Draw this to the manager's attention as a safety item and stipulate that you be given one should you buy the car. This is something that probably will have to be ordered.

4. the weather stripping was loose on one of the windows. (This may be more than just a cosmetic thing)

Draw this to the manager's attention as something that will have to be fixed properly as an ultimate conditin of sale. Is the rubber torn/worn/damaged, or just come unglued? Just shoving worn/damaged weatherstripping back in place may fix nothing. Or it may just need a little adhesive, depending on where it is and how it was originally attached.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
We were going to take a test drive this weekend, but the form the salesman brought back for us to sign required that we have both collision and liability insurance.

That's the first time I've ever heard of someone being asked for any proof of insurance when going for a test-drive. I go on test-drives all the time and neither my wife or I have ever been asked to sign anything or show any proof of insurance. We just give them a copy of one of our driver's licenses and away we go!

We live in PA, so I'm guessing our laws put the dealers insurance as the primary insurer.

What if you didn't have a car and wanted to buy a car that day? Would they require you to have insurance to test-drive it? That would seem awfully counter-productive.

mz00m
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
3. There were a few cosmetic defects, is it reasonable for me to ask them to fix them before I come back for a test drive?

For a test drive, no. That is not reasonable.

But it is very reasonable to have them fixed as a condition of your purchasing the vehicle. The alternative would be to offer a lower price for the car. It's also reasonable to ask if the items are something the dealer will consider fixing as a part of the deal.

If these are important items to you, I would not buy the car without the items being fixed. Lots of times the dealer will ask you to buy the car and give you an IOU for the repair items. The problem is that you have no idea what the quality of the repair will be. That's not too much of a concern over supplying missing items (like your cigarette lighter), but it's more of a concern over things like paint scratches or mechanical repairs. Sometimes you won't know if a paint scratch will buff out or require repainting the whole panel until you try the buffing.

--Peter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
In my experience, the garage policy would generally be primary on owned vehicles and under personal auto policies, coverage on temporary substitute autos is invariably secondary ...

As someone else pointed out, this can vary by state. In Georgia, car dealers have a very good political lobby so the test driver's insurance is primary. Since the OP called his insurer, I assume he got the correct information.
Print the post Back To Top