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Hey, this isn't investing jargon, but chatroom jargon: could someone please tell me what "DN" stands for?

I tried googling it, but the only thing I came up with was "darling niece", and I doubt that was the right answer, because the poster was using it to refer to her ex-husband, and I got the impression that it's a derogatory term.

Thanks!
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Greetings,

Well, DN can stand for lots of things:

Relative - Dear/darling/Damn/darn/dang Nephew/Neice
Tech - Domain Name
Direction - DowN as in the opposite of Up.

I tried googling it, but the only thing I came up with was "darling niece", and I doubt that was the right answer, because the poster was using it to refer to her ex-husband, and I got the impression that it's a derogatory term.

How about "dang nincompoop"?

Regards,
JB
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Well, "dang nincompoop" does seem to fit the situation...

I think that within a few years it's going to be impossible for your typical English-speaking person to understand what anyone in a chatroom is talking about, without having to take a special language course to understand all the abbreviations and acronyms.

Or, should I say, ITT WIAFY, IGTBI for YTESP TU WAIACR ITA, W/O HTT ASLC TU ATAAA.
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Greetings,

I think that within a few years it's going to be impossible for your typical English-speaking person to understand what anyone in a chatroom is talking about, without having to take a special language course to understand all the abbreviations and acronyms.

No, we are already here if you think about just what is a typical English-speaking person as there are various different English slang depending on which region of the world you use as an example.

Just to give an example here the CA in your name could be short for California, using the standard 2 letter state abbreviations, or Canada, where Canadian web sites usually end in ".ca", but what about New Zealand, Australia, or England? Those last few places speak English but yet it isn't the same English as in North America in some areas. Think about a "Barbie" which in Australian English is a BBQ while in the US it is likely a type of doll from Mattel.

This is without gettings into other short forms like when someone says a "flat" in North America it is a reference to a tire that has lost most of its tire pressure while over in England it is a common term for an apartment. Slang and other manglings of the English language are common enough that there is a learning curve when it comes to using a new medium. Ever try to read text messages or IMs that are littered with short forms like "ASL" or "How R U?" type of thing.

Last but not least, think about this question: If you called me a dog, is that an insult or a compliment? For the former think of how some say that "all men are dogs" meant in a degrading way while there are those like Randy Jackson on American Idol that call people a "dog" and it is intended as a compliment like, "What's up dog?"

Regards,
JB
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