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The other day, on the traffic report, the announcer listed several of the usual areas, saying that they were slow, or normal, or had x minutes of delay. Then he finised with saying that "The George Washington Bridge is just jake".

Has anyone heard this expression before? Am I just that out of it? Or, OTOH, am I too young (at 44)?

And what does it mean? Should I take the bridge, because traffic is flowing well, or avoid it, because it's totally jammed?


David
(loves the jazz, but gets annoyed at the announcer/DJ)
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Has anyone heard this expression before? Am I just that out of it? Or, OTOH, am I too young (at 44)?


No comment.

However, you can take the bridge with confidence.

(The word's been around meaning "A-OK" since the early 20th century, and I suspect more so in jazz circles.)

MOI
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Has anyone heard this expression before? Am I just that out of it? Or, OTOH, am I too young (at 44)?


You're too young. MUCH too young! I've got a good few years on you, and I knew it from an earlier generation. My recall is that it went with the bobby-soxers who screamed and swooned when the young Frank Sinatra crooned.


sheila
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You're too young. MUCH too young! I've got a good few years on you, and I knew it from an earlier generation. My recall is that it went with the bobby-soxers who screamed and swooned when the young Frank Sinatra crooned.


Thanks. I go as far back as "Cool beans".


David
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Cool beans????

Eluded me totally!

Where did you grow up?


sheila
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Trying to pinpoint it, I found:

the term jake in the American vernacular is defined as: adj. Slang; Suitable or satisfactory; fine; Everything's jake with me. The word entered the vocabulary in the early 20th century.

And...."an old phrase meaning 'everything is cool.'"

I had hoped for something a lot more specific.


sheila
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Cool beans????

Eluded me totally!

Where did you grow up?


I grew up in the South (NC to be specific). I didn't hear it a lot, but I've been known to hang out with some jazz musicians, so I think I picked it up there.

And I have seen a coffee shop called "Cool Beans", although I don't remember where it was.

David
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I grew up in the South (NC to be specific). I didn't hear it a lot, but I've been known to hang out with some jazz musicians, so I think I picked it up there.


I looked up "cool beans," and one site says it appeared in the 1960s as an offshoot of "cool" that appeared on the jazz scene in the 1940s. The other references I found all peg its appearance to the 1980s. I agree with the 1980s. In the 1960s I wouldn't have been unaware of current slang. In the 1980s, I had started my family, was working as a freelance writer, eventually volunteer work at my kids' school, aging parents, blah blah blah.....and the list of what passed me by is probably long and interesting!


sheila
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I looked up "cool beans," and one site says it appeared in the 1960s as an offshoot of "cool" that appeared on the jazz scene in the 1940s. The other references I found all peg its appearance to the 1980s. I agree with the 1980s.

I had heard the term prior to the 80s, but I think that in the 80s it went from an obscure old term to a current popular one.

Although IMO, as far as slang terms go, a rather odd one. But for some reason, jazz musicians seem to have a language of their own, more so than any other musical category.


David
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Although IMO, as far as slang terms go, a rather odd one. But for some reason, jazz musicians seem to have a language of their own, more so than any other musical category.


The definitions I found alluded to common usage, kind of an amplification of plain old "cool." It either bypassed Manhattan, or bypassed me -- entirely!


sheila
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The definitions I found alluded to common usage, kind of an amplification of plain old "cool." It either bypassed Manhattan, or bypassed me -- entirely!

I take it then that you don't listen to WBGO? (88.3 FM)

I've heard it used there on occasion.


David
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