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Your manager wants you to come in next Monday when you are supposed to be out of town on vacation. Never mind that said manager requested, with great urgency, to have your vacation schedule 8 months ago and you provided it at the time. Of course, it does not help that they have not hired anyone else that could potentially provide backup.

Work/life balance, what's that?

- zol
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>> Work/life balance, what's that? <<

Work your butt off until you're 65 or more (or until we offshore your job and/or you start making too much money), and then you can have all the life you want. Sounds like balance to me.

#29
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Your manager wants you to come in next Monday when you are supposed to be out of town on vacation.

Yep!!! Stories like that are nothing but a bad memory.

Regards,

ImAGolfer (retired '03)
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Your manager wants you to come in next Monday when you are supposed to be out of town on vacation. Never mind that said manager requested, with great urgency, to have your vacation schedule 8 months ago and you provided it at the time. Of course, it does not help that they have not hired anyone else that could potentially provide backup.

Work/life balance, what's that?

- zol


Does your manager's name happen to be Lumberg?

;-)
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>> Of course, it does not help that they have not hired anyone else that could potentially provide backup. <<

A phrase comes to mind here: "Failure to plan on your part does not constitute a crisis on my part."

#29
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zol: just say no...really.

I've occasionally had previous managers request ridiculous last minute things, and if I had other things planned and had told them of my plans in advance I never felt it was a problem to say, "I'm sorry I can't do that as I am going to be away then." Firmly, calmly, but with no option of backing down. I would always offer something like - "let me prepare an executive summary for you before I go," or "let me talk to the client about scheduling that meeting a week later," or "let me ask person X from another department to be a temporary contact", etc...

It is their problem. A resourceful manager can ALWAYS find a solution. From hiring a consultant short-term to get it done, to having the hard conversation with the person leaning on him/her, to doing the work themselves...

I'm now self-employed, and often I get little bonanzas of work from managers who had people leave or were unable to do things. If your team has consulting resources they should be able to find another solution.
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Ummmmm.


Not really a problem for unionized employees at the utility company where I worked for twenty years before leaving in 1999.


Blue collars got double time for any overtime worked after the first 100 hours of overtime per year. You got called to ask if you wanted to work, and were free to refuse if it didn't appeal to you. You got paid a minimum two hours of overtime regardless of how much time you actually worked, and got paid from the time you were called to the time you got back home.


You got paid $12.50 for "dinner money" if you worked three hours or longer, and again for each additional three hours worked. For many years, this was petty cashed and not subject to taxes until the IRS complained.


If you worked most of the night, you were routinely excused from working the next day, but got paid for that time not worked.



Some people never worked overtime, a goodly number worked as much time as they could get. Company Vice Presidents were known to complain the blue collars were making more money than they were, and some no doubt were, making from $100,000-$150,000.


When a utility needs unscheduled work done, it can be a pretty desperate matter, and often is a matter of importance for customers who have no service. It may be that the company agreed to generous payments in order to insure that when they called, people would turn out. If so, they got what they paid for, since people did turn out and sometimes might work for days on end during storms or construction disasters to remedy hazards to the public and restore service to customers.


No doubt a lot of white collars are saving themselves the cost of union dues, though.



Seattle Pioneer
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No doubt a lot of white collars are saving themselves the cost of union dues, though.

I think the modern worker is a moron for not supporting unions.
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No doubt a lot of white collars are saving themselves the cost of union dues, though.

I think the modern worker is a moron for not supporting unions.

Rational thought is not your strong suit, I see.
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Your manager wants you to come in next Monday when you are supposed to be out of town on vacation. Never mind that said manager requested, with great urgency, to have your vacation schedule 8 months ago and you provided it at the time. Of course, it does not help that they have not hired anyone else that could potentially provide backup.

Hear, hear. I will be on a plane tomorrow flying to a last minute meeting of questionable purpose (meaning I don't exactly know what the purpose is) that I am supposed to "chair." I found out Tuesday and spent most of the weekend just trying to find out where to go when I get off the plane. As to cancelling vacation, I've done that twice this year; once involving selling an event ticket at a loss (I should be able to recoup the difference from my travel reimbursement if I eat cheap while out of town). The best part is taking crap for having all this unused leave and comptime on the books while busting my butt. 2007 is not the year of the sloth.

Sure stokes the FIRE though.

FoolNBlue (Knows FIRE can't come soon enough)
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A phrase comes to mind here: "Failure to plan on your part does not constitute a crisis on my part."

#29


"Failing to plan is planning to fail." -- John Wooden

JLC
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As to cancelling vacation, I've done that twice this year
I never did this in 14 years of a corporate career, and it didn't harm me one whit. I had many promotions and ended up running a large department.

In the last year there (my 15th) I only did it once - two months before I got laid off - and it had no effect on my evil boss's decision to force me out, so the correlation between sacrifice for the company and gain is zero IMO.

And think about it this way - would the company sacrifice for you? Not really. It lays off people when it needs to - which may be a sensible business decision. But it also makes the sensible business decision to offer its employees paid vacation time, which one is entitled to use. Not taking it because of dedication to one's job is silly.

And I say this as a dedicated type A personality who typically works at least 60 hours a week, and has done my whole career. Who is not averse to yaking a red-eye to be at a job-site first thing in the AM, or for work travel as needed. But once I plan a vacation, that is it. It stays scheduled barring personal emergencies. And no amount of work pressure would make me change that. Especially after my experience the one and only time I ever did so...
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Who is not averse to yaking a red-eye
errrrrrrrr...that's TAKING a red-eye. I can't type.
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>> >> Who is not averse to yaking a red-eye << <<

>> errrrrrrrr...that's TAKING a red-eye. I can't type. <<

I was wondering. I mean, I've seen my cat yak a furball, but I've never seen anyone yak a red-eye...

#29
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No. of Recommendations: 9
"Your manager wants you to come in next Monday when you are supposed to be out of town on vacation."

I find the words "Precisely how much is it worth to you?" are quite... clarifying in situations like this. Everything has a cost, including my indulgence with regards to planned vacation time. If it is that critical, you can afford to pay the cost.

For me, the situation was that I had precisely two conditions when I was in negotiations with my current Japanese employers. The first, and my biggie, was that I be guaranteed that I would always be able to come home for Christmas. They said they were in principle able to offer that, but that "In the event of severe business necessity, we might have millions of dollars riding on your skills, so we would need you in the office." I told them I could accept that, and that in that case I would bill them $X per day between December 20th and December 31st, where X was my yearly salary. They sort of blanched at the number. I told them "Well, we're already in principle agreed that I am getting Christmas off, and if you have millions riding on me that you will lose if I come back a week later, then you can afford a few trifling hundreds of thousands of dollars in overtime to save them."

How does the song go... I'll be home for Christmaaaaaaaaas, you can count on meeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...
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Well, don't keep us in suspense! It's now Monday. Did our plucky hero defy the villianous Manager of Doom, or is he now strapped to his office desk as a megawatt laser slowly burns its way towards his keyboarding hands? The audience quivers with antici...
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. . . The audience quivers with antici...



+++
+++


Not me!

sunray
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And I say this as a dedicated type A personality who typically works at least 60 hours a week, and has done my whole career.


My boss is the type that works 16 hours a day 6-7 days a week. You can put just about anything on his shoulders and he'll find a way to get it done.

But everyone knows when he schedules a vacation the only thing that can change those plans is if he dies before the vacation starts...
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Well, don't keep us in suspense! It's now Monday. Did our plucky hero defy the villianous Manager of Doom, or is he now strapped to his office desk as a megawatt laser slowly burns its way towards his keyboarding hands? The audience quivers with antici...

Ha, ha, ha! As you can imagine, we did go on vacation and now are going through the gazillion e-mails. The compromise was to work remotely and return to the office later in the week if necessary. Fortunately they found a fix before we had to cut our vacation short. Needless to say, it was the most stressful vacation ever!!!

- zol
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Just a quick point. I had the same request, "please work for a day or two in the middle of your vacation".

I agreed, but gave demands (which were met), of them paying for the hotel, and all meals for the day (at nice restaurants), and of course not counting those days as vacation days.

So at the time of this vacation we ended up with a nice hotel room on the beach in Miami, had room service, etc, paid by the company. I did have to sit in the room for 10 hours each day, but my wife enjoyed herself quite a lot, and them paying the costs took some of the sting away.
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