No. of Recommendations: 6
... likely a boat or an aircraft, too. Why buy when you can rent?

Reasons You'll Regret an RV in Retirement
https://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/retirement/T037-S001-rea...

</snip>


intercst
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We did the Airstream factory tour this summer:

https://www.airstream.com/company/factory-tour/

Very good tour if you're in the area.

We were amazed to see how much they cost, though. The depreciation on that $100-150k purchase price pays for a lot of nice hotel rooms. In any case, I married a city girl. Camping is not her thing at all.
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I haven't been in one, but I like the hiker trailer setup. These are small, 4x8 or 5x8, have storage, can be fitted with a stove and an outdoor shower setup. 2 people could sleep comfortably in them, and you can get them into small backcountry campsites which are usually on dirt/gravel rutted roads. But the ones I see online that I like, with a beefed up axle and suspension, run about $20k. And I just don't camp that much. But if I ever see a good deal on a used one, I'll think hard about it.
It would be fun to do a national park tour with one of these. I spent a week living in a tent in July while doing a bike tour, and I just aint into tent camping for more than a few days.
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Ahoy there!

Yes, most of those reasons in the Kiplinger
article not to buy a RV seem to also
apply to owing/operating a good sized boat
suited to live aboard.

We are considering buying a trawler
(Grand Banks 42'to 46')
to do The Great Loop (link below) but
have to realistically deal with all those
negatives with a RV.


Except the "It Can Get Lonely on the Road" reason;
based on many nautical themed blogs that we have read,
most "loopers" find that they make
lots of friends on their journey.

Cast off...

https://explore.globalcreations.com/theblog/adventure/americ...
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When we retired we had the best kind of boat.
A neighbor with a boat docked at the marina. ;-)

After a few years, they _begged_ us to go boating with them. Gets boring pretty quick.
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they _begged_ us to go boating with them. Gets boring pretty quick.

Yes, agree.

Can't think of anybody that would want to go
boating, and certainly not on that monstrosity of
boating: cruise ships, of all things!

Had a lot of friends who retired and went on
cruises. Norovirus R'Us. But, on the other hand,
they took off a lot of weight, many more pounds
than their diets had been able to remove.

vez
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My first purchase in retirement will be a boat.

PSU
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My first purchase in retirement will be a boat.

Go with a horse instead.

Wally
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Go with a horse instead.

I already have the horse. I need to add to my misery.

PSU
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{{I already have the horse. I need to add to my misery.}}

But do you have a cold blood team and the fancy carriage for them to pull?


c
turned down an offer for two "free" carriage ponies.
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... likely a boat or an aircraft, too.

During his decade of retirement, my dad has bought a boat, three airplanes, and two Teslas. The boat has since been sold because his hip trouble doesn't allow him to climb around on a sail boat (42 feet, lots of woodwork to refinish) much anymore. And he traded one Tesla in for a new one. Says he'll do that again in the not too distant future. The three airplanes are all leased to the local flying school. He has never flown in any of them. He told me, with genuine surprise in his voice, "ThyPeace, that most recent plane actually made a profit last quarter, even after depreciation and costs!"

The good thing is that he is having fun with it all.

ThyPeace, Dad likes toys and projects. He's running a foundation and supporting the development of another, taking care of my sister, plays dominoes twice a week, and is grousing about not getting all the yard work done that he wants to get done. I worry about the occasional falls, the fact that he's almost 81 years old, that he took mom's passing really hard, and that he needs to eat more healthily. Toys? I don't worry about those.
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c
turned down an offer for two "free" carriage ponies. - c


---------------------

Reminds me of a guy I used to work with.

His wife took up riding and eventually the place where she rode offered her a free horse that would be hers and she could pay to stable it there. OK for a while, but she wanted to have the horse close at home. They lived on 5 acres so she first talked her husband in to fencing a couple of acres and building a barn. After a while she got into some sort of competitive trail riding, so he had to buy a 20+ foot trailer and a new F250 to pull it with to travel to these competitions. Shortly after that he had to build a covered parking pad to protect the trailer from the sun and pine needles.

He once told me that his wife's free horse had cost him around $100K. John died not too long after this and as far as I know his wife has given up riding.
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He once told me that his wife's free horse had cost him around $100K.

Is that all? He got off easy.

PSU
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John died not too long after this and as far as I know his wife has given up riding.

Isn't it interesting how stuff simplifies when the person creating the complexity becomes responsible for maintaining it.
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Has anyone mentioned buying a Harpsichord in retirement?

--Peter
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You’re a hit with the neighbors Pete :)
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Has anyone mentioned buying a Harpsichord in retirement?

No, but I'm seriously entertaining the idea of buying a classic Bluethner:

http://www.bluethnerworld.com/index.php/en/bluethner-classic...

To me, it's the best sounding piano I've ever played - better than Becksteins, Boesendorfers, Steinways, etc.

Pete
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harpsichord...

For those who do not know the story:

https://boards.fool.com/lbym-pariahs-revisited-the-harpsicho...

ThyPeace, read it only long afterward. This is how a virtual oral history happens, apparently.
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" Go with a horse instead.

I already have the horse. I need to add to my misery.

PSU "

*******************************************************

Have you considered buying water wings for the horse?

people would likely pay good money to see you put them on the horse.

Howie52
Not known for quality suggestions.
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The three airplanes are all leased to the local flying school.

My uncle learned how to fly and purchased a plane with several other guys. Their plan was to lease it out part time, and use it for themselves part time, so they wouldn't have to pay to rent planes when they wanted to fly. Then one morning they turned on the news and found out that their plane had been seized by Customs & Border Patrol, because they had been leasing it to human traffickers who were bringing illegal East European immigrants in from Canada. After they got the plane back from the Customs impound, they sold it.

AJ
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When I got a job at Wichita, there was an employee group which owned a hot-air balloon. I guess as some sort of partnership, you bought a share. I had the chance to buy in and was hot to do so. Friend wife put the kibosh on that!

Probably a good thing, since a year later we moved to Chicago. Kind of hard to fly in a Wichita-based hot-air balloon when you live in Chicago.
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When we retired we had the best kind of boat.
A neighbor with a boat docked at the marina. ;-)

After a few years, they _begged_ us to go boating with them. Gets boring pretty quick.


That reminds me of when we had season tickets to the Texans. You couldn't get anyone to go if one or both of us didn't want to go. And preseason tickets forget about it. You couldn't use preseason tickets for wipes yet you paid full fare for them.

I finally started using NFL Ticket Exchange and actually made more than enough there to cover not only our 10 game package but our parking as well.

To be fair we really enjoyed tail gating. Really used to get poop faced with the Miller Lites and ate some good food. Different recipe ever game day. It was the walk from the parking lot up the ramps of the stadium that finally did us in. 15 years was enough. Got a big screen and now we really enjoy the games.

Regards,

ImAGolfer (retired '03)
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No, but I'm seriously entertaining the idea of buying a classic Bluethner:

Good. You have understood the spirit of The Harpsichord. It is not the exact item that is important. The important part is the reason for wanting it, and they way in which the decision is reached.

My in-laws bought an RV in retirement. Two, actually. They wore the first one out. I don't believe they ever regretted it.

--Peter
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Of course, posts like this give us some pause
about doing an extended boating cruise...
I think we'll need to adopt a diesel mechanic and
an electronics expert..


http://www.pcmarinesurveys.com/BAHAMA%20LOG.pdf
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I'm not the camping type of person so RVs aren't even remotely on my radar. I do have a house with a fairly large swimming pool. They can chew up a chunk of your money as well. Water (evaporates quickly in AZ), electricity for the pump/filter, getting it resurfaced every ~10-15 years, chemicals and/or hiring someone to take care of it.

I"m guessing $200-300 per month over the life of a pool. It does feel good when you use it.



Rich
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We were amazed to see how much they cost, though. The depreciation on that $100-150k purchase price pays for a lot of nice hotel rooms. In any case, I married a city girl. Camping is not her thing at all.

The depreciation plus the incremental cost (insurance, more gas than driving a car to the same place, etc.) would pay for a lot of hotels. That was my thought when I attended a Time Share sales pitch to get the free *whatever* they were offering. $12K will pay for a lot of hotels, plus who wants to go to the same place every year (or pay to switch places or week of going). The RV isn't stuck in one place, but man I would hate driving that thing around the state much less the whole country. A sports car (or luxury car for some) + hotels would be more my lane.

You have to enjoy the RV lifestyle (herding that beast around the interstate, narrow city roads and parking lots) and do a lot of traveling. I'm sure it's OK for some, but a lot of people don't think it all the way through.

It must be possible to rent one to see if the expectation is close to reality. Or, maybe accompany an RVing couple on a trip.
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The RV isn't stuck in one place, but man I would hate driving that thing around the state much less the whole country. A sports car (or luxury car for some) + hotels would be more my lane.

You have to enjoy the RV lifestyle (herding that beast around the interstate, narrow city roads and parking lots) and do a lot of traveling.


I'm hopeful. I've driven small RVs a couple of times when heading to Burning Man with friends. It's not much fun, and dealing with pumping out black water and powering appliances on propane is annoying and error prone. But I see a magical future when autonomous electric vehicles are a thing. Then I get a Tesla Semi and a container (or smaller) size thing fitted out to be all electric. It's essentially a mobile vacation home that (like a cruise ship) lets me wake up in a new place every day or so. There's room to put a sports car in the back, and a couple of scooters. With a good charging network, it's magical.

All told, it seems as though it should be about the cost of a modest house, certainly less than $500K (although I can imagine luxury barges being arbitrarily expensive). I think that sort of thing will become a popular form of retirement home. It hinges on autonomous driving though.

-IGU-
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It must be possible to rent one to see if the expectation is close to reality.

There are lots of local and several national companies which rent RVs. Generally most types, except for 5th wheels, can be rented.
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"I do have a house with a fairly large swimming pool. They can chew up a chunk of your money as well. Water (evaporates quickly in AZ), electricity for the pump/filter, getting it resurfaced every ~10-15 years, chemicals and/or hiring someone to take care of it.

I"m guessing $200-300 per month over the life of a pool. It does feel good when you use it."

I'm in the same boat...well, pool

On day one, your pool is worth 2/3rds of what you paid for it. You never get the money back. Instant depreciation

I pay $90/month for pool service now.

The electric bill goes up another $50-60 in the summer time as the pump runs 10 hours a day here in TX .....down to maybe 6 hours in the winter..... and if it gets below 37F, it runs on slow speed as a freeze guard.

You'll probably need a new pump every 8-10 years and a new filter about the same time.

When I'm home during June, July, August and most of Sept, in the pool every day. do water aerobics every other day. Beats going to the gym when it is 100F outside.

Beats going to the rec center pools...they are nice if you are into doing laps....not me. $120/yr rec center membership. Also great gyms with scads of machines. Not too busy during the day during the week. Also have giant outdoor town pools here, and if you are wannabee wealthy you join the country clubs - and they all have pools...but it will cost you probably $10,000 a year.....

I've known a few full time RVers. Half of them wind up buying a house and spending half a year there, half a year traveling. Half are happy snow birds - traveling south in winter, north in summer and have social groups at both places for support......

t.
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"We were amazed to see how much they cost, though. The depreciation on that $100-150k purchase price pays for a lot of nice hotel rooms. In any case, I married a city girl. Camping is not her thing at all."

When I first retired, I looked at buying a VW truck based camper....very nice, shower, etc...about 22 foot - and got 15 mpg. Used for $50K. Just a couple years old.

Then I did some figuring. I would have to use it for 90 days a year to offset 90 days of motels and probably most dinners out. My car then got 30 mpg. So I'd burn a lot more gas on trips and I usually don't sit for long in one place. If you want power and cable TV etc...you either run the generator (more $$$) or go to RV park for $25 or $35/night.

I thought about it...for a while....then didn't buy it.

I probably travel about 90 days a year....do 25-30K miles. Stay in motels and eat dinner out.

I'm not the RV type....


t
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for a family of 3 or 4 or 5...and RV probably saves enough on meals to make the equation work in your favor.....

t.
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Not very many families of 3 or 4 or 5 in retirement.
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I pay $90/month for pool service now.

You would think a retired engineer could handle that job.

The electric bill goes up another $50-60 in the summer time as the pump runs 10 hours a day here in TX .....down to maybe 6 hours in the winter..... and if it gets below 37F, it runs on slow speed as a freeze guard.

If you don't have one, you should look at a variable speed pump.

PSU
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PSU:"You would think a retired engineer could handle that job."

I did for 25 years....but traveling and pools doesn't always work out. I'd be gone for a couple weeks and come home to 'swamp land'.....and maybe the Kreepy clogged up with some leaves or small twigs.....and pool not ready for use....maybe 2-3 days to get it back to normal.

Got a variable speed but during the summer, it is set for fairly high speed to keep Kreepy moving and the pool salt system working........

during colder weather, crank it way back - 4 hours a day higher speed, 4-5 hours slower speed.....freeze guard at 'speed 1'.....

I also have lawn service......got rid of my mower a few years ago.

Heck, I can afford it. No need to pinch pennies. I should be spending twice as much as I do.

But I'm not going to buy a boat (had years of fun with boats and water skiing as a kid growing up and into my 20s).....or a big RV...... did lots of tent camping as a kid..... but no interest now. My friend belonged to club with small planes and he had pilots license. Did enough flying with him to convince me small planes are a distraction and I have no interest in them. So no plane. Half the time you couldn't make it to your destination - weather problems or something else.....if you wanted to go a couple hundred miles and back.


t.
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I'm in the same boat...well, pool

On day one, your pool is worth 2/3rds of what you paid for it. You never get the money back. Instant depreciation

I pay $90/month for pool service now.

The electric bill goes up another $50-60 in the summer time as the pump runs 10 hours a day here in TX .....down to maybe 6 hours in the winter..... and if it gets below 37F, it runs on slow speed as a freeze guard.

You'll probably need a new pump every 8-10 years and a new filter about the same time.



I just realized how lucky I had it. When my kids were elementary school to teenager, my generous and friendly next-door neighbors put in a pool. My family got to use it whenever we wanted, but I always made sure to go over with a six-pack or a tray of something delicious, although my kids + (stay at home homemaker) wife got to use the pool more than anybody during the summer when the neighbors were at work. ("We need the pool to get used so the splashing around lets the filter do its job.")

Then those neighbors moved...and the house was bought by even friendlier generous people. When they went on an all-summer-long vacation, they asked my wife to do their skimming and pH balancing, but we essentially had a cost-free pool that summer.

Then *those* neighbors moved...and the house was bought by a family that wasn't generous with their pool...just as my oldest moved out, the next one was in college, and the youngest two had driver's licenses and preferred to go to a city pool to meet their friends and be social.
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I just rec'ed an 18 year old post. Thanks.
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"I just rec'ed an 18 year old post. Thanks. "

That's some long term thread.

Or perhaps you have an exceptionally strong memory?
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You're welcome, iampops. That's how oral history becomes stronger in the virtual age, apparently. We go back and reaffirm the parts of the things that were popular then, making them that much more popular when viewed from here.

Howie52, it was the harpsichord post that is 18 years old.

I'm not a great the keeper of most of this history. That falls to people who have been here longer than I have. But if you just sort any board on number of recs, you start to see what we really think is important. Here on the Retirement Investing board, the top-recced posts are about life being about more than money, Social Security being a good thing, why the national debt increased under a particular administration, how to reduce your personal debt, and a personal anecdote supporting the notion that the American health care system doesn't work as well as others.

Up to us to decide if that's what's most valuable on this board, or if other things are. It's just what has made it to the top so far.

ThyPeace, and now the harpsichord post has 810 recs.
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But if you just sort any board on number of recs, you start to see what we really think is important.

How can we do that sort?

TIA

culcha
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Just click on the board title to see the most recent posts and then click on the underscored Rec column header.
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