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For the past few months I have been trying to re-create the biscuits found at Red Lobster restaurants. I got a few recipes off the internet and have made several batches from them. Yesterday, I made a batch that is the closest yet, but I'm still not satisfied so I'm appealing to you pros to get me home. Latest incarnation:

RED LOBSTER CHEDDAR BAY BISCUITS

INGREDIENTS
3 cups Bisquick
1 cup buttermilk
2 cups shredded cheese
9 tablespoons grated butter
1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
1 teaspoon Italian herbs
1 teaspoon garlic powder
2 teaspoons baking powder

DIRECTIONS
Heat oven to 375
Combine Bisquick, Old Bay seasoning, Italian herbs, garlic powder, baking powder
Add and mix in butter, cheese
Add buttermilk
Stir together but do not overmix
Transfer to lined, 8X12 baking dish
Bake for 30 minutes

HISTORY
The first thing I changed was the milk. I started with half and half but first changed that to regular then to buttermilk.
Next, I tinkered with the temperature and time of cooking, starting at 375 then 400 then back to 375, time varying from 12-40 minutes.
Finally, I went from dropping with a spoon onto a cookie sheet to using an ice cream scoop to putting the mixture into an 8x12 baking dish (ala corn bread albeit, of course, drier and thicker).
The first few batches weren't too bad but I wasn't satisfied with the way the biscuits fell--not at all like RL. I hit upon the idea of using the baking dish, realizing, of course, that I wouldn't come out with individual biscuits but that was OK.
Now, I asking y'all how to get a lighter, bigger "biscuit" out of what I've shown. Again, it would be all right if I didn't have the individual thingies as long as it/they turned out as light and high as RL.
Thank you for your help.
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Not having tried the recipe, I would say that changing to buttermilk has changed the acidity of the mixture. To balance it out, you might try adding a small amount (I'd start at one-half teaspoon) of baking soda. That should make the entire thing rise a bit more.

Good luck, and let us know your eventual "perfect" recipe.

Leana
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Leana,
Thanks for the tip.
Is that in addition to the baking powder?
~D
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Is that in addition to the baking powder?
Here's what I found with a little googling

To achieve the desired result when using buttermilk instead of milk, be sure to substitute baking soda for some or all for of the baking powder. For each cup of buttermilk used in place of sweet milk, reduce the amount of baking powder by 2 teaspoons, and replace with 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda.

Science time...
Baking powder is a mixture of sodium bicarbonate and cream of tartar, a bicarbonate and a weak acid. When you add buttermilk instead of regular milk (or cream) you are introducing more acid into your batter. In order to balance this out, you need to add in more base, baking soda.

In your recipe, I'd try it with just the baking soda, but if they are still heavy, I'd try adding back in the baking powder.

Leana
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I'd try increasing the baking powder. That is your source of bubbles that make the biscuits lighter.

If too much, the biscuits might become salty. Increase the amount but keep to a minimum.

Note that Bisquick has its own baking powder. Outdated baking powder can lose its umph. Make sure ingredients are fresh.
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Have you researched any of the copycat recipes? Genius Kitchen generally does a good job of recreating recipes:

https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/red-lobster-cheddar-bay...

This copycat recipe similar:
https://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/330/Red_Lobster_Biscu...

-Donna
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Hi! I'n not that familiar with RL biscuits but I did go on a biscuit-making quest a while back.

I'd ditch the Bisquick and use biscuit flour (like Lily White, Southern Biscuit etc.) with baking powder and salt as per the recipe on the bag. This site explains why and shows how they tested different flours:

https://cookingontheside.com/the-results-are-in-which-flour-...

Everything should be as cold as possible so the oven melt produces plenty of steam (that's where the height comes from, says "Cooks Illustrated").

I got more height, too, when I folded the dough several times on a floured surface. I was afraid of overworking but you can fold, turn, and fold without overworking the dough.

I'm guessing it's harder for drop biscuits to get high (heh) because they won't have the layers of steam pockets but that's just a guess.

I got better results when I used a hotter oven and a metal sheet or rimmed pan instead of a Pyrex baking dish. Those two factors actually got the worst results, which was sad because that's how my mother always made them (even though in hindsight they were a bit hocky-puckish side).

Good baking :-)

cm
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I would cut back on the butter by half. Between the B milk and butter, there is too much fat and the biscuits will be flat. As already stated I would ditch the Bisquick
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Thanks to all who contributed thoughts to my quandary. Will let you know when I've achieved my goal.
~D
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