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Previous owner put up a large mirror, four feet wide, 2.5 feet tall on the bathroom wall. They probably used Liquid Nails since there isn't a frame or other way to hang it.

What is the safest way to remove it. Definitely going to wear protective clothing and gloves. I thought just pry it away from the wall and see how much glue they used. Any other ideas?

Thanks,
Barbara
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Crisscross it with duct tape first.
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Protective goggles.

Good luck!

Karen
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If you're wearing proper PPG, I would suggest the easiest way to demo it is in pieces. Maybe control the pieces by scoring it with a cheap glass cutter in a rough grid pattern, and then break/pry each little square off the wall with a putty knife or whatever.

xtn
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Previous owner put up a large mirror, four feet wide, 2.5 feet tall on the bathroom wall. They probably used Liquid Nails since there isn't a frame or other way to hang it.

What is the safest way to remove it. Definitely going to wear protective clothing and gloves. I thought just pry it away from the wall and see how much glue they used. Any other ideas?


Are you sure it is glued? Is it flush to the wall all the way around or is there a gap? If a gap it may have hidden anchors and the mirror can be removed by lifting/prying up from the bottom. Given the size it is probably a job for two people. Good luck.

George
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Barbara,

Clean the mirror then apply a plastic wrap like Saranwrap across the entire surface.

Lay a piece of heavy plastic, cloth or a tarp across the area below the mirror to allow for easy cleanup.

Use a flat bar, start at an upper corner and push the bar in slowly, holding it flat to the wall.

It should start to peel off.

If large pieces break-off, use a razor cutter to cut the wrap and lay the piece aside.


Does that help you?

Gene
All holdings and some statistics on my Fool profile page
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4'x2.5' doesn't seem to be a large mirror. The mirror in my bathroom is about 8'x4'.

PSU
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There are specific glues for mirrors - they do not damage the silver on the back. It seems reasonable such glues would also allow for removal - hopefully without breakage.

You could contact a local glass & mirror company and ask them for an estimate on removing the mirror.

See this:
http://tinyurl.com/yy9fh6xp
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I would check to see if the mirror is being held in place by mirror clips. The mirror clips on my mirror are similar to this:
https://www.amazon.com/Prime-Line-Products-10246-Spring-Load...
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"Previous owner put up a large mirror, four feet wide, 2.5 feet tall on the bathroom wall. They probably used Liquid Nails since there isn't a frame or other way to hang it."

We had such a mirror in a previous residence, except that it was taller and wider. We were renovating, and my wife wanted a somewhat smaller mirror in a frame. Prying the old mirror off the wall didn't seem feasible because there was no space between the sides of the mirror and the adjacent sidewalls, and between the bottom of the mirror and the adjacent top of a thick back-splash. I happened to have some heavy-duty suction cups with handles that I had seen on a bargain table in an Ace Hardware Store, so I offered them to the two big guys who were doing the renovation. They applied the suction cups to the mirror and repeatedly yanked on the handles with greater and greater force until the mirror came free, revealing that it had been stuck to the underlying drywall with several blobs of Liquid Nails. Of course, the weaker drywall had lost the tug-of-war to the stronger blobs of Liquid Nails.

The wall was patched and repainted. Since the plate-glass mirror was undamaged, it was reduced in size, framed with plywood and molding, and rehung.

Mostly lurking,

Ratio ~
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...the plate-glass mirror was undamaged...

Wow! Not something I'd count on.
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Btw, for anyone wanting to frame an existing mirror, I've had good results with www.mirrormate.com

YG
not a fan of unframed mirrors
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