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https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-16/rich-reti...


I assume these writers have not been told about the decades-worth of articles
about people not saving for retirement.

Howie52

Soon to be legally a poster on this board rather than an interloper.
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But I'm going to be that retiree who lives to 113, so....
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On what planet is 300K "rich"? These are "rich" retirees?

Given that the GOP has made noise in the past about cutting medicare and SS benefits, the constant specter of future inflation, I'd say a 300K nest egg for someone with no job income isn't frugal or rich, just prudent. Maybe they want to leave their kids a bit, too?

If you can tell me the exact date and time of my death, maybe I'll spend more. Else I'm not going to spend down my savings in the hope that I die before I hit zero.
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Perhaps they are trying reverse psychology?

No.
That would require a degree of respect toward their audience
and the intelligence to implement the plan - which media has
lost the capability to perform.

Howie52
ya gotta figure someone dim told them to write the nonsense.
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StockGoddess asks,

On what planet is 300K "rich"? These are "rich" retirees?

Don't forget that most Americans have little in the way of a net worth -- $300k puts you in the top 30% and you're "rich" compared to the other 70%.

intercst
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SG: If you can tell me the exact date and time of my death, maybe I'll spend more. Else I'm not going to spend down my savings in the hope that I die before I hit zero.

I solved that issue when I married the Countess. She is 17 years younger than I am, and likely to outlive me.

CNC
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Don't forget that most Americans have little in the way of a net worth -- $300k puts you in the top 30% and you're "rich" compared to the other 70%.



I just read recently that a retiree with $400,000 in savings was in the top 10%.
After having been made to feel like a pauper because we had not saved "millions", I felt much better.
Our SS, small pension and a small draw down from our savings has proven to be quite enough.
We moved from a very expensive neighborhood in NY several years ago to a small town in New England. Our expenses went down over 50%. We moved close to one of our kids and that is a big plus.
We live within walking distance of the ocean. Also a big plus. We don't miss NY city at all.
Well, maybe the good restaurants and Broadway theatre but the pluses that we have here in our new town outweigh anything that we left behind.
People here are so much nicer that we thought "what's in the water".
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We live within walking distance of the ocean. Also a big plus. We don't miss NY city at all

Oh! So envious.

I love the sound and smell of the ocean. I could just sit in a chair near the ocean and....breathe. Paradise.

DH was born and raised in NYC. He moved to the mid-sized city we both live in and we married after we met here, raised 2 kids, still here.

He said once that when you live in NYC - the people, the energy, the hustle, the up-till-midnight, up-at-six life, you can't imagine wanting to EVER live somewhere else even if a roach-infested efficiency walk-up costs more than a Midwestern 4-bedroom house on 3 acres.

And once you leave, you can't imagine ever wanting to move back.

Ocean. Mmmmmm.
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"maybe the good restaurants and Broadway theatre"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

DW and I went to a NC Stage Company play in Asheville,NC
for our anniversary. A great time and a fun venue.
The Peace Center in Greenville, SC is also a good place
for concerts, plays and musicals.

No - not NYC - but I think the fun you can get out of
a theater and eateries is kind of part of what you carry
into the places.

That's Entertainment - ain't it?

Howie52
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"We live within walking distance of the ocean. Also a big plus. We don't miss NY city at all

Oh! So envious.

I love the sound and smell of the ocean. I could just sit in a chair near the ocean and....breathe. Paradise.

DH was born and raised in NYC. He moved to the mid-sized city we both live in and we married after we met here, raised 2 kids, still here.

He said once that when you live in NYC - the people, the energy, the hustle, the up-till-midnight, up-at-six life, you can't imagine wanting to EVER live somewhere else even if a roach-infested efficiency walk-up costs more than a Midwestern 4-bedroom house on 3 acres.

And once you leave, you can't imagine ever wanting to move back.

Ocean. Mmmmmm. "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

There is a trick to enjoying life.
You find the things that bring you joy in the places you find yourself.
There are positives in all places. Sometimes those positives are
slim and not enough to make you choose to go back again - but
they are enough to keep a person's focus.

The trick to being miserable is to focus on those things that drive
you nuts.
Easier - but frowns tend to leave their mark.

I have tried to choose the joyful side.

Howie52
really annoys other folks as well.
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I just read recently that a retiree with $400,000 in savings was in the top 10%.

I'm trying to construct my life such that when I retire, pensions and SS will easily cover day to day expenses plus a little left over for fun.

Yet if I had that today, I would not be comfortable with only $400K in the bank. I might be with double that though.....

Which makes me wonder if I will be one of those that will spend considerable less than I could safely do just out of fear of running out later.

Jim
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"I just read recently that a retiree with $400,000 in savings was in the top 10%."

They should differentiate between retiree's with income (pensions) supplementation vs those that must live solely on savings.
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No. of Recommendations: 8
""I just read recently that a retiree with $400,000 in savings was in the top 10%."


In New York City he'd be living in a small 5th floor walk up with no car and just barely getting by. In a small town in the south he'd be middle class, own a decent car, and be one of the more financially stable residents of the town.

Location, location, location.

Art
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<<Well, maybe the good restaurants and Broadway theatre but the pluses that we have here in our new town outweigh anything that we left behind.>>


Just out of curiosity, how many times/year did you go to the theater when you live in NYC?


I suspect that for quite a few people, there are cultural or recreational facilities near where they live that they use only infrequently.




Seattle Pioneer
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SeattlePioneer asks,

Just out of curiosity, how many times/year did you go to the theater when you live in NYC?

Years ago when I lived in Southern California I had an ocean view apartment in Del Mar and what was probably the most scenic 10 minute commute in the nation on the coast highway to an office in La Jolla. After a couple of weeks, I rarely noticed the Pacific Ocean.

What I leaned from that is it's not worthwhile for me to pay a premium for a view.

intercst
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<<SeattlePioneer asks,

Just out of curiosity, how many times/year did you go to the theater when you live in NYC?

Years ago when I lived in Southern California I had an ocean view apartment in Del Mar and what was probably the most scenic 10 minute commute in the nation on the coast highway to an office in La Jolla. After a couple of weeks, I rarely noticed the Pacific Ocean.

What I leaned from that is it's not worthwhile for me to pay a premium for a view.

intercst>>


Well intercst, you've sold me on the desire to drive that stretch of highway. Sounds terrific.


I recall seeing an interview with Seattle Sonics basketball start "Slick" Watts.

He recalled that when he first signed as a pro basketball player, the first thing he did was to go out and buy an expensive BMW, and show it off around the old neighborhood he grew up in.

"After a couple of weeks, it was just another Volkswagon!"


I always liked that comment on consumerism.

I take a lot of satisfaction from my collection of tools. They give me the freedom to decide to work on a project and in many cases to be able to complete a project easily and accurately.

But is that really a status symbol, or just another case of having a useful Volkswagon available to use? More the Volkswagon, I think, since I value the utility of having tools, not using them to show off.



Seattle Pioneer
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Years ago when I lived in Southern California I had an ocean view apartment in Del Mar and what was probably the most scenic 10 minute commute in the nation on the coast highway to an office in La Jolla. After a couple of weeks, I rarely noticed the Pacific Ocean.

What I leaned from that is it's not worthwhile for me to pay a premium for a view.

intercst


A little over ten years ago we lived here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/24160789@N04/3065301080/in/alb...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24160789@N04/3065301048/in/alb...

Loved the view, but even that no longer held the attraction it once did.

CNC
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And once you leave, you can't imagine ever wanting to move back.

Ocean. Mmmmmm.


I never thought I'd see the day that I would NOT miss living in the Big Apple.
Hubby worked there for over 25 years. I myself worked in the building where Fox news is broadcast from. I worked in a bank and the building held lots of different businesses. I once saw Al Sharpton in the lobby. He was fat then!
For the past four years we have been trying to find decent Chinese food. Well, we found it.
My daughter mentioned a place in another town. We went last week and we thought we'd died and gone to heaven. The food was excellent. We were people who used to hop on the subway to Chinatown in New York and eat like pigs for $20 - that was the entire bill for the two of us.
We have always lived close to the water but quite frankly the East River does not smell very good.
We loved Jones Beach on Long Island and we miss that most of all because we loved walking on the very long boardwalk in the Spring, Fall, Winter. Never in the summer when it was so crowded.
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No - not NYC - but I think the fun you can get out of
a theater and eateries is kind of part of what you carry
into the places.

That's Entertainment - ain't it?


Yes, I agree. When we first moved here we would take the commuter train into Boston. We'd have lunch and then see a play. My kids would give us gift cards for the restaurant and tickets for the play. Then we got a dog and now we go to the local theatre which is within walking distance. Going into Boston was an all day affair and we would not leave the dog home alone all that time. He's like our baby!
The local theater puts on really great productions and you might even get to see a neighbor doing a bit of acting in the play too. Also, a new take out/restaurant is opening soon and it's also within walking distance. I can't wait!
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Yet if I had that today, I would not be comfortable with only $400K in the bank. I might be with double that though.....


We'd most likely have had double too but hubby started getting laid off in his early 50's, right about the time we were paying back the money we borrowed to send our two kids to private colleges.
I don't regret one single penny that we have ever spent.
I have a BIL who is worth more than a million dollars and he never made as much money as my husband did BUT he was a fanatic about saving.
Now he says he has so much money he doesn't know what to do with it.
Well, he is estranged from his kids who he didn't have to educate. He worked a sometimes hateful job for 35 years. Good for him.
My husband always said "he flies by the seat of his pants". We have sometimes had to live our life that way. Selling our house to raise cash after a lay off is very very painful but
We are happy. Our children are successful and again, we have no regrets. But that's just us.
To each his own.
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We are happy. Our children are successful and again, we have no regrets.

You are very wealthy indeed.
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On what planet is 300K "rich"? These are "rich" retirees?

Don't forget that most Americans have little in the way of a net worth -- $300k puts you in the top 30% and you're "rich" compared to the other 70%.


You really need to read the original article: https://www.onefpa.org/journal/Pages/FEB16-Spending-in-Retir...

Neither of the Bloomberg articles linked to it did it justice. The pool of retirees in the study were between 65 and 70 and had participated in the Consumption Activities Mail Survey (CAMS) conducted by RAND in 2000. RAND conducts the survey every 2 years.

The pool of retirees in the study were divided into quintiles based on their financial wealth rather than net worth or income. Income was from the following sources: Social Security, pensions, business and investment income, capital gains, and withdrawals from retirement funds plus transfer payments from governments.

There is no reference to $300,000 or $300K in the original report. I'm not sure where that came from. To be in the fifth quintile, you had to have a financial worth of around $550K in 2002.

This is another study where the researchers seem to believe that you can't have a comfortable retirement without spending all of your income each year. I don't see much value in buying things that you don't need or, occasionally, want.
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Just out of curiosity, how many times/year did you go to the theater when you live in NYC?


When we lived in Brooklyn a TKTS booth opened near by. We were able to get tickets at half price.
I would guess that we saw Broadway plays 6-8 times a year. Sometimes we got really good seats near the front.
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I lived in Arlington, VA for about 7 years. Just a 10 minute drive into DC when not rush hour - or a five minute walk to the Metro and a 15 minute ride into DC at rush hour or any other time up until 10pm when it shut down. Had a townhouse.

during the year, I'd head out to Wolftrap for performances year round - probably six times a year. I'd frequently visit the Birchmere - best place for bluegrass and folk. saw at least a dozen shows a year and was a regular on thursday nights for the Seldom Scene - probably 3 times a month when in town or not having class on that day.

Took courses for my Masters Degree at GWU.

Occasionally went into DC, maybe twice a year, for a 'broadway' show - at the theater. Saw Cats and one or two other things there, and went to the Kennedy Center once or twice a year.

There were folk music festivals out at Glen Echo a few times a summer. Headed to that about 2 times a summer.....and did get up to the amphitheater in MD - but it was a fairly poor venue......saw Santana there and one or two other things.

Also I hit a few of the free or cheap programs put on by the Smithsonian - lectures, travel shows, etc.

It was a VERY busy 7 years....but that was now decades ago. At age 70, probably would only do 1/5th of that!....... but....got tranferred to TX...and there isn't much going on here without fighting the crowds and traffic.

Usually just hit the movie theaters and skip the 'live' shows and performances.....but maybe catch one or two a year at local theaters - some amateur productions and some music at smaller places.

My sis lives outside of DC. She ushers at Kennedy Center and another orchestra place and probably sees 10 shows a year. Always on the go......she's now 69 coming up on 70 this month. (Hubby died year ago).....


t.
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<<Just out of curiosity, how many times/year did you go to the theater when you live in NYC?


When we lived in Brooklyn a TKTS booth opened near by. We were able to get tickets at half price.
I would guess that we saw Broadway plays 6-8 times a year. Sometimes we got really good seats near the front. >>



Thank you. Always curious about whether people actually USE the opportunities they have at hand!


Seattle Pioneer
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<<during the year, I'd head out to Wolftrap for performances year round - probably six times a year. I'd frequently visit the Birchmere - best place for bluegrass and folk. saw at least a dozen shows a year and was a regular on thursday nights for the Seldom Scene - probably 3 times a month when in town or not having class on that day.

Took courses for my Masters Degree at GWU.

Occasionally went into DC, maybe twice a year, for a 'broadway' show - at the theater. Saw Cats and one or two other things there, and went to the Kennedy Center once or twice a year.

There were folk music festivals out at Glen Echo a few times a summer. Headed to that about 2 times a summer.....and did get up to the amphitheater in MD - but it was a fairly poor venue......saw Santana there and one or two other things.

Also I hit a few of the free or cheap programs put on by the Smithsonian - lectures, travel shows, etc. >>



Heh, heh! Bread and circuses for the Roman population?

Probably a few Christian bakers who don't like serving homosexuals put to the sword under Obama.



Seattle Pioneer
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Thank you. Always curious about whether people actually USE the opportunities they have at hand!


Welllll, I could see the Statue of Liberty from my kitchen window but as typical of some New Yorkers, never got to go. I never wanted to go. We did take a tour of Ellis Island though which was interesting. We loved Battery Park, at the tip of Manhattan. We loved the Wall Street area as both of us worked there many years ago. We loved the theater district. There are many great restaurants on "Restaurant Row".
I also miss spotting celebrities on the streets of Manhattan and Brooklyn. No celebs in my new neighborhood but that's OK. I had my fill. I once got a tiny little glimpse of Brad Pitt when he was filming "Burn after reading". It was being filmed around the block from my apartment. He was hopping into a big black SUV and if I had blinked, I would have missed him.

Right before we moved here four years ago we were going to see the WTC Memorial and museum but the Boston bombing happened, security was tightened and we decided not to go. Too stressful.

I miss the theater, the restaurants, but the people here in our new town are the best. We live in an association with a total of 18 units. Most of the people are our age. We all watch out for each other. Quite different than living in an apartment of 110 units where you never see your neighbor and if you do, they may or may not acknowledge your existence!
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brooklyn:"Welllll, I could see the Statue of Liberty from my kitchen window but as typical of some New Yorkers, never got to go. I never wanted to go. We did take a tour of Ellis Island though which was interesting. We loved Battery Park, at the tip of Manhattan. We loved the Wall Street area as both of us worked there many years ago. We loved the theater district. There are many great restaurants on "Restaurant Row".
I also miss spotting celebrities on the streets of Manhattan and Brooklyn. No celebs in my new neighborhood but that's OK. "

I grew up in NJ outside NYC. Dad commuted via bus into work in Manhattan.

The only time we went to DC was either a school trip (to the UN) or to the German part of NYC for a German class field trip........or when visitors came to town and dad would show them around NYC and the sights. Times Square - Wall Street area - .

Did get to radio city music hall for a show or two........and that was about it for 'theater' in NYC.

Did get to the Statue of Liberty......and a few other things. Rode the Staten Island Ferry..... Palisades Amusement Park was still operational when I was a kid and we went there once or twice (in NJ across from NYC)......

but...in general...maybe one trip every 2 or 3 years. ON weekends we went the other direction - to the summer place or to the hills or skiing later on.......and avoided the city.

When I was 16, I went into the city to take FCC ham radio license exams by myself on the bus......and subway.....checked out "Radio Row"......but didn't have a lot of money to spend so just gawked. then headed home before rush hour.

When I was 19, worked one summer in Manhattan for the phone company - in between college semesters. Hot. Sticky. Crowded....worked my 8 hours and couldn't wait to get out of the city! (and the buses only ran to 7pm or so to get home!)......real crappy service after that - maybe once an hour or 90 minutes and a walk twice as far.....from the bus stop.

Even in DC, the Metro shuts down at 10PM....limiting what evening activities you can do....unless you can hop a cab home...... or drive and pay outrageous private parking lot fees.....for those that stay open late.


t
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<<When I was 16, I went into the city to take FCC ham radio license exams by myself on the bus......and subway.....checked out "Radio Row"......but didn't have a lot of money to spend so just gawked. then headed home before rush hour.
>>


I remember going to the FCC offices in downtown Seattle to take my General Class and Advanced Class code test and exam. Not Manhattan, and I was very familiar with downtown Seattle. But still a good experience.

Too bad the FCC has pretty much eliminated testing in its offices. I think that was a way of building loyalty and respect for the Federal government.



Seattle Pioneer
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There is a trick to enjoying life.
You find the things that bring you joy in the places you find yourself.
There are positives in all places. Sometimes those positives are
slim and not enough to make you choose to go back again - but
they are enough to keep a person's focus.

The trick to being miserable is to focus on those things that drive
you nuts.
Easier - but frowns tend to leave their mark.

I have tried to choose the joyful side.

Howie52
really annoys other folks as well.



This is really wise advice, Howie.

I lived in Chicago for 20 years and loved it. Wouldn't trade those years for anything. But now I'm back in my native Cleveland and finding lots to like too.

Big cities like NYC and Chicago offer a plethora of options lesser cities can't really match, it's true... but my experience was that most folks in big cities find their own "niche" and pretty much stick to their own handful of favorite places. Which one can do anywhere.
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Years ago when I lived in Southern California I had an ocean view apartment in Del Mar and what was probably the most scenic 10 minute commute in the nation on the coast highway to an office in La Jolla. After a couple of weeks, I rarely noticed the Pacific Ocean.

What I leaned from that is it's not worthwhile for me to pay a premium for a view.



I'm somewhat different. When I lived in places with a view, I never tired of enjoying and appreciating the view I had. Even after years went by.

But it's true that giving up a view won't change your day-to-day life any, as Paul Terhorst observed in his book.
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"Too bad the FCC has pretty much eliminated testing in its offices. I think that was a way of building loyalty and respect for the Federal government."

The FCC I think did away with ALL testing. Commercial and Amateur licenses. There are volunteer/pay groups that do the commercial stuff - which has been dumbed down into a General Radio License. I had a First Radiotelephone Commercial license......which got me my best summer job in college. Had to go to NYC to take that one too.....and it was fairly tough. Worked at WGY-WGFM-WRGB for the summer as a 'broadcast replacement tech'...so the regular folks could take vacations. Great union shop type pay. $111/week plus 10% more for evening and overnight shifts.....when minimum pay was around $1.20/hr. Then back for senior year at college and off to making $185/week as a electrical engineer in the far Chicago suburbs.

Ham licenses are given by ARRL or W5YI Volunteers....and I'm certified for both to give the tests as a VE. Did for a good spell with the local club...but they usually have more than enough so not needed these days.

I took the Amateur Extra Exam in Chicago office......which is , of course, downtown.

now they did away with code tests completely.



t.
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"Big cities like NYC and Chicago offer a plethora of options lesser cities can't really match, it's true... but my experience was that most folks in big cities find their own "niche" and pretty much stick to their own handful of favorite places. Which one can do anywhere. "

Agree...I'm in the burbs.....but there are two ham radio clubs and lots of ham radio activities here.

Go to breakfast with a group of about 10-20 each Saturday when in town. Two club meetings a month. Health club is a few miles away. Lots of food shopping within a few miles. Good airport if you want to get away......within 'shuttle distance'.....or driving if you want to spend the money to park.

I don't do entertainment 'clubs' or activities along those lines in the evening. They are more concentrated toward the 'inside the beltway' area......

Loads of restaurants to eat at...closest is Boston Market a mile away, Mexican restaurant 1.5 miles away, and rest within 10-20 minute drive - everything you can think of from Greek to Italian to Mediterranean to Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Golden Corral, Furrs, IHOP, Denny's , and just about every chain restaurant there is.

But you gotta drive here. You want walk-ability, your options are a lot more limited here......in the Dallas area. Even downtown much of the food stuff shuts down after the commuters leave and what is left is $$$.

The younger folks hang out in Deep Ellum - loud rock and alternative music, techno, ......guess you can be within walking distance.......

we got enough movie theaters to go around......

But you got to have a car here in my suburb......

t
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"I'm somewhat different. When I lived in places with a view, I never tired of enjoying and appreciating the view I had. Even after years went by."


My parents had a nice 'summer home' (it was a year round house but they only stayed there about 5 months a year) in upstate NY right on Lake George. Million dollar view out the big windows facing south, down the lake for miles, including the island chains. Off to the left the other side of the lake and the undeveloped mountains. Spectacular view. But..it was miles from anywhere. CLosest small town as 8 miles away. Ticonderoga with grocery stores was 20 mile, 35 minute trip. Small gym in Ti. No movie theater - it shut down 15 years ago.

Entertainment usually only during the July/August period of any kind......

You wanted 'shows' or movies - 40 minute drive, over the 'mountain' down to Glens Falls.

After a few days, I got itchy. Great view, great swimming and canoeing and such.....but if I were there by myself, I'd get bored quickly. I would never live there. My parents enjoyed it.....they had friends drop by.....and dad puttered about.....they ate home most meals. Me? I eat out most dinners.

My sis spends the summers there. She is always on the go. Here, there.... and has two grown kids that come by - one just on holiday 3 day weekends, the other is a stay at home mom so she spends a few weeks there. With grandkid.

But...despite the million dollar view, I'd go nuts being there. Not my cup of tea.

----

I lived in VA 2 miles back on a gravel road at the end...on a nice ridge with fantastic view of the BLue Ridge mountains for 70 miles......from west to northeast - closest point about 20 miles away. When the weather was real clear, you could see 50-60 miles easily.....and this in the middle of 10,000 acres of woods......I enjoyed the house for many years. Was working and had great ham radio station with big towers - and that kept me busy when not at work......or doing things in town. Ate most meals at home. Maybe once a week out when doing evening activities in town before heading home.

I had to change jobs and leave the area. Sad to leave the house on the hill, the view....but you 'can't eat a view for dinner'...so had to go where the job was (DC area) and did. No view out the townhouse window.....just urbia right across the street, or the 'alley' behind on the other side looking into the wall of other townhouses in the development, with a few 'trees' and shrubs to break it up. I had to hop in car to go places with 'scenery'.


t.
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There is a trick to enjoying life.
You find the things that bring you joy in the places you find yourself.
There are positives in all places.

How right you are Howie.
Hubby lost his job in Manhattan in 2002. He was in his 50's and we thought he was unemployable at that age and at that particular time. So, he sent a resume to a bank in Rhode Island and he got the job.
50% pay cut BUT it was better than being homeless. He needed a job.
Housing was much cheaper there and because we made a profit on the house we sold, we were able to buy a 5 bedroom house in Providence. The house was to die for. Hubby picked it out because there were only one or two houses available in the neighborhood that we wanted to live in.
I spent almost two years doing cosmetic renovations myself. I turned a shabby house into a beautiful house while hubby worked twelve hour days.
The job that he had been hired to do never materialized. Meaning, the person who he was supposed to replace never got promoted and it created a real problem for him as this person saw him as a threat.
So, we sold the house almost two years later and made a profit of $105,000. Not bad. It was the height of the housing market at that time and we did well enough to pack up and move back to NY where we rented a loft apartment in an area of Brooklyn that we had wanted to live in since forever. DH landed a job about 6 months after we moved.
Long story short, we loved Providence. The restaurants were the best ever since there was a college that had a good cooking program. Theater was very very inexpensive and we saw lots of good plays. I believe we saw Brian Dennehy twice, one of my favorite theater actors. Also saw Bette Midler at the Providence Performing Arts Center. We walked often in our beautiful neighborhood and I volunteered at a psychiatric hospital for awhile only to realize that the inmates were far less threatening than the persons running the joint.
So yes, we made do in that town. The job was hateful and nearly cost my husband a breakdown but we got out before that but enjoyed the town, the restaurants and the theater not to mention having had the house of my dreams for less than two years.
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<<I took the Amateur Extra Exam in Chicago office......which is , of course, downtown.

now they did away with code tests completely.
>>




I still have the Advanced Class amateur radio license. At the time, there was a two year waiting period for the Extra class license plus the 20 WPM code speed requirement. Never got around to doing that when I became eligible.


<< I had a First Radiotelephone Commercial license......which got me my best summer job in college. Had to go to NYC to take that one too.....and it was fairly tough. Worked at WGY-WGFM-WRGB for the summer as a 'broadcast replacement tech'...so the regular folks could take vacations. Great union shop type pay. $111/week plus 10% more for evening and overnight shifts.....when minimum pay was around $1.20/hr. Then back for senior year at college and off to making $185/week as a electrical engineer in the far Chicago suburbs. >>


Smart move.


The Commercial Radio Telephone and Radio Telegraph licenses qualigied people for a lot of good jobs, and were reasonably accessible.


Kinda too bad they are gone.


Seattle Pioneer
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<<My parents had a nice 'summer home' (it was a year round house but they only stayed there about 5 months a year) in upstate NY right on Lake George. Million dollar view out the big windows facing south, down the lake for miles, including the island chains. Off to the left the other side of the lake and the undeveloped mountains. Spectacular view. But..it was miles from anywhere. CLosest small town as 8 miles away. Ticonderoga with grocery stores was 20 mile, 35 minute trip. Small gym in Ti. No movie theater - it shut down 15 years ago.

Entertainment usually only during the July/August period of any kind......

You wanted 'shows' or movies - 40 minute drive, over the 'mountain' down to Glens Falls.

After a few days, I got itchy. Great view, great swimming and canoeing and such.....but if I were there by myself, I'd get bored quickly. I would never live there. My parents enjoyed it.....they had friends drop by.....and dad puttered about.....they ate home most meals.>>


I always thought girls were supposed to be the local entertainment for boys in areas like this...



Seattle Pioneer
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SP:"The Commercial Radio Telephone and Radio Telegraph licenses qualigied people for a lot of good jobs, and were reasonably accessible."

Well, the Radio Telegraph License First Class required two years ship board experience to get. And you had to have the Second Class Radio Telegraph License. That was 25 wpm straight text and 20 wpm code groups if I remember right. Skipped that one.

Broadcast stations only required First Class RadioTelephone Commercial License.

Where I worked (50KW AM station) they had to have, at the time, a First licenses on duty at all times they were on the air...which was 24/7.

My main job from midnight to 5:30 AM in the morning was writing down the meter readings every 30 minutes and signing the log..... they went 'live' with the morning show about that time..the farm reports, weather, etc..with a live announcer and live engineer. During those 5 1/2 hours my duty was 'read the meters' and play one side of each of the pre-selected 33 1/3 rpm records.....one after another, fading the music down every 30 minutes and hitting the 'cart' button for a pre-recorded 'WGY 810 Schenectady'........ the rest of the time I could read or goof off....usually had a book or two with me.

Then it was off to the TV commercial area to splice together the morning ads......35mm film spliced together so ads would run consecutively in the ad breaks.....maybe 30 of them.

Did that then off to the studio to set up the 'new' color cameras...which took 30 minutes to tweak and adjust each morning......

About that time it was 8am and time to go home. Worked midnight to 8 half the summer, and 7 to 3:30 the rest......

Fun job. On Fridays they shut down the station at 1am and the chief engineer and I would head on out to the transmitter site.....and do 'maintenance' on it.....Impressive site...650 foot tower and gigantic 50KW plate modulated transmitter, 175KW generator, and 5KW standby transmitter which we tested each time as the 'backup'......

Stopped at donut place on way home for coffee.....

Learned a LOT about AM and TV stations. FM was totally automated.....music came on carts, stuck in the giant cart machine, and it did the rest. inserted ads, played the music, ID'ed, and that was it.


t.
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Loved the view, but even that no longer held the attraction it once did.


We bought my house on 5 acres in the country in 1978, Hudson OH. My DH died in 1987 and I stayed on in my house. Now at 81 I have to pay people to help with upkeep, yard work. But I never ever tire of the beauty around me and I hope I don't ever have to leave.

I think if you love the theater, you find a way to go, wherever it is. If you love the ocean, you spend time walking the beach, taking photos, swimming.

I bought a fairly expensive car because it suited my needs. It is seven years old...I may have it forever. And I enjoy a little luxury....

I did not quite understand the article on seniors not spending enough...who wants to blow it all when you may need it later? That's for lottery winners. And yes, as you age, medical expenses could wipe you out. I do not deny myself...if I want something, I buy it. I don't go on a lot of trips because when I do, I find I can't wait to get home again....except I would like to go back to Hawaii again...but it is that damn long airplane ride.

Birgit
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"I did not quite understand the article on seniors not spending enough...who wants to blow it all when you may need it later? That's for lottery winners. And yes, as you age, medical expenses could wipe you out. I do not deny myself...if I want something, I buy it. I don't go on a lot of trips because when I do, I find I can't wait to get home again....except I would like to go back to Hawaii again...but it is that damn long airplane ride." - Birgit
-------------


What a nice post! My feelings exactly. My wife and I bought a home in Middle Tennessee 11 years ago and we'll probably be here the rest of our lives. I expect one day they'll be dragging me out of here feet first with my hands folded across my chest. I'd like to see Hawaii but now that I have painful arthritis travel no longer appeals to me. I prefer to be home where I can stumble around in the morning and complain about how bad I feel <grin>. Congratulations by the way, from your post it sounds like you are doing great.

Art, the years tick by, now 64 years old and counting....
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"..but it is that damn long airplane ride.

Birgit "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I don't mind the airline flight - I just have trouble with the
time lost at the airport - and all the rigamarole you have to
put up with to get to the plane - and back off.

The more complicated a travel activity becomes, the less fun the
travel itself becomes.

Howie52
I know the destination is supposed to be the main thing - but the
getting there used to be so much more fun than it is now.
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Howie52, "I know the destination is supposed to be the main thing - but the
getting there used to be so much more fun than it is now."

--------------------------


All pile into the station wagon and get out the bologna sandwiches and soda pop and chips and look out the window and read the billboards. Drive with the family to the Outer Banks or St. Petersburg or the Florida Keys. If you were lucky you might get to go to a seafood restaurant and eat shrimp or crab?

Fun times!

Art
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"Howie52, "I know the destination is supposed to be the main thing - but the
getting there used to be so much more fun than it is now."
--------------------------


All pile into the station wagon and get out the bologna sandwiches and soda pop and chips and look out the window and read the billboards. Drive with the family to the Outer Banks or St. Petersburg or the Florida Keys. If you were lucky you might get to go to a seafood restaurant and eat shrimp or crab?

Fun times!

Art "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

The sandwiches get too damp if you drive to Hawaii.

Howie52
And the seafood sometimes bites.
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"The sandwiches get too damp if you drive to Hawaii. - Howie52, And the seafood sometimes bites."
-----------


We never made it to Hawaii. We weren't that lucky. I do have a nephew that lives there with his girlfriend. He posts pictures on Facebook. At this stage of my life that will have to be enough.

Art
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We never made it to Hawaii. We weren't that lucky. I do have a nephew that lives there with his girlfriend. He posts pictures on Facebook. At this stage of my life that will have to be enough.

Art


Well, Art, I am some years older than you, and we go to Hawai`i every year.

Years ago we avoided Hawai`i as expensive, remote, and no improvement over California. After all, CA has ocean. We have beaches and palm trees. Who needs Hawai`i? Then we took one of the "sucker" offers, you know, "Stay in our palatial resort for five days for $50, and we will even include a rental car." We have been back every year since.

CNG
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Here's the model for airplane seating:

https://www.google.com/search?q=Brookes+(ship)&sa=X&...
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""Stay in our palatial resort for five days for $50, and we will even include a rental car." We have been back every year since." - CNG
--------------------

Yeah, that's how they get you. <smile> At this stage my wife isn't going anywhere. She prefers to just stay here and take care of her cat and her mother. She doesn't want to travel. Her mother is 88 years old and she doesn't want to get too far from her in case she is needed. My wife is very devoted and loyal which is good for me too.

Once a year she has to go the PRSA (Public Relations Society of America) meeting because she is the head of the PR department where she teaches and the faculty adviser for the student chapter of the organization. At that meeting is where a lot of contacts are made for future jobs for those kids. Anyway she goes because it's her job and it's important but she'd rather stay home.

I'm sure Hawaii is lovely. I don't know if we'll ever get there. I'm sort of thinking "then a miracle occurred" might have to happen first.

Art




And then there might be this way too.... excerpt from Mark Horton's NDE, "I had to merely think of a place and time and I was there, experiencing everything about the place and time and people present." (It's a holographic universe thing.) http://www.kuriakon00.com/celestial/nde/mark_horton.htm
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"look out the window and read the billboards"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Burma Shave in some areas - but I recall reading about
Barbara Fritchie's candies on road signs driving west
toward Frederick,Md on Rt. 40. The road slowly evolved
into I-70 in places - and then straight on through.

Howie52
Course, straight is not exactly the route used for I-70
or that portion of the Pa. Turnpike from Breezewood
through to New Stanton
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""look out the window and read the billboards""


Lady Birds highway beautification drive has eliminated 99% of all bill boards along the interstate........ you drive and drive and drive thousands of miles and seldom see any.

State highways are different, but in many states, there are limited numbers of bill boards....


t.
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tele shares, "Lady Birds highway beautification drive has eliminated 99% of all bill boards along the interstate."


I used to have a homing pigeon named after Lady Bird Johnson. She was a speckled homing pigeon that I named Lady Bird after President Lyndon Johnson's wife. That's how long I kept homing pigeons. I didn't stop raising pigeons till I was in my mid 40's and I got arthritis.

Art
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" I didn't stop raising pigeons till I was in my mid 40's and I got arthritis.

Art "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

perhaps you were raising them too high?

Howie52
The first thought was "what were you doing to those poor birds!?"

I find that aches and pains do tend to get in the way of work and
fun - but mostly with respect to my knees. The knees in turn cause
me to forget everything I ever learned about lifting - which in turn
strains the back.
Which in turn causes me to remember most of what I learned about
lifting - which then acts on the knees.

I think that is what folks refer to as the "circle of life".
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"I find that aches and pains do tend to get in the way of work and fun - but mostly with respect to my knees. The knees in turn causeme to forget everything I ever learned about lifting - which in turn strains the back. Which in turn causes me to remember most of what I learned about lifting - which then acts on the knees. I think that is what folks refer to as the "circle of life". - Howie
----------------------------------------


When I got painful arthritis and my backs and hips gave out on me in my mid 40's is when my mortality really hit home to me. Before that I never gave it much thought and it was always something distant and far off. I realized just how fragile I was and I started thinking about dying. That was also about the time I learned about the internet and we got a computer and I started reading stories about near death experiences, death bed visions, and the holographic universe theory. I found it comforting and it gave me hope.

Art
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Art:"When I got painful arthritis and my backs and hips gave out on me in my mid 40's is when my mortality really hit home to me. Before that I never gave it much thought and it was always something distant and far off. I realized just how fragile I was and I started thinking about dying. That was also about the time I learned about the internet and we got a computer and I started reading stories about near death experiences, death bed visions, and the holographic universe theory. I found it comforting and it gave me hope. "


And now Art has discovered dieting and likely is feeling better since that 100 lb monkey on his back is starting to disappear.


t.
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" I found it comforting and it gave me hope.

Art "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Hope is a good thing and we all need a smidgen or two.

Faith is also a good thing - and we do need faith.

And love.

All three are multi-directional - and also multi-dimensional.

I do not know about holo-graphical.

I think people think more about mortality as they see their
loved ones pass - and the more direct contact you have with
death - the handling of the body - the dealing with the
mortuary - the internment or cremation - the thinking about the
person/people who have passed - the more likely you are to
consider your own passing and about how people might have to deal
with that event.
I recall a dream I had when my father passed - I dreamed he came to visit
and was standing at the foot of our bed. He said "No matter what, you
have to remember ..."
And I promptly forgot what was said to be of critical importance.

Howie52
And that is the story of life.
Again, kind of circular.

Well maybe a glob - stuck in the corner of a drawer in a forgotten
bureau - out behind the shed or in the back of the barn.

With mice living in the other corner - and a cat atop the bureau
waiting for some sign of movement just to be certain nothing escapes.
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All pile into the station wagon and get out the bologna sandwiches and soda pop and chips and look out the window and read the billboards.

My husband has memories of leaving New York and driving down to Florida, and somewhere along the way they'd stop at a place called "South of the Border" which he describes as the cheesiest, kitschiest truck stop in existence.

Looks like it's closed now

http://www.bing.com/search?q=south+of+the+border+sc&src=...
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I have memories too. This site says it's still open. http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/2211

Here's some history. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_of_the_Border_(attractio...

culcha
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>>All pile into the station wagon and get out the bologna sandwiches and soda pop and chips and look out the window and read the billboards.>>

If you drove across the country in the 60's-70's you couldn't miss the Wall Drugstore billboards. They saturated the center of the country for 100's, if not 1000's of miles. Haven't been out there for decades, wonder if they're still there.
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"If you drove across the country in the 60's-70's you couldn't miss the Wall Drugstore billboards. They saturated the center of the country for 100's, if not 1000's of miles. Haven't been out there for decades, wonder if they're still there. "


Still there and it is a giant tourist trap. At least as of 2 years ago when I went through there.


t.
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"And now Art has discovered dieting and likely is feeling better since that 100 lb monkey on his back is starting to disappear." - tele


Tele, before the arthritis I was much thinner than I am now. I weighed about 240 lbs when my hips and back gave out and I got the pains in my hips. At that point I thought "what's the point of even trying?" and I started just eating what I wanted and quit exercising because if I hurt all the time what difference does it make?

Get it? The weight came after the arthritis. I was riding bikes and swimming and lifting weights and doing stairmaster almost every day. I was keeping the weight off. I gained a lot of weight after I woke up with the pain in my hips.

Capisce?

Art
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a place called "South of the Border" which he describes as the cheesiest, kitschiest truck stop in existence.

An apt description imo.


Jim
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"Tele, before the arthritis I was much thinner than I am now. I weighed about 240 lbs when my hips and back gave out and I got the pains in my hips. "


Well, at 240 lbs, maybe you had about 60 lbs too much that you had to carry around.....maybe more.....


t.
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I remember those signs from the 50s.....we took a few trips down that way.......one to FL, one to NC I think to visit Uncle Bill......


t.
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<<And now Art has discovered dieting and likely is feeling better since that 100 lb monkey on his back is starting to disappear.


t. >>


I hadn't heard about that.


Perhaps Art can tell us more about that?


Best,


Will
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I hadn't heard about that. Perhaps Art can tell us more about that? Best, Will


Last December I had my yearly physical and my blood sugar finally got up over the magic number of 130 so I was officially declared diabetic. My blood sugar was 146 and my A1C was 6.7. So my doctor says to me "well you're diabetic." Always before he'd say "you're pre-diabetic." That was enough to put the fear of god in me and make me start do something about my blood sugar. I cut way back on the carbs and sugars, no noodles or pasta, no bread, no potatoes, no rice, no corn, etc. and no ice cream or cake, etc. I'm trying to keep it down below 60 grams of carbs a day.

So far I've lost 4" in my waist. It's coming off slow. My body seems especially reluctant to lose it in my waist. Anyway diabetes doesn't seem like a fun way to go, having my feet amputated, going blind, or kidney failure and ending up on dialysis. No thanks! So it made me try and do something about it. My doctor didn't put me on any drugs right then so hopefully with me losing weight and seriously reducing my carb intake I can stay off an diabetes medication.


Art
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<<Tele, before the arthritis I was much thinner than I am now. I weighed about 240 lbs when my hips and back gave out and I got the pains in my hips. At that point I thought "what's the point of even trying?" and I started just eating what I wanted and quit exercising because if I hurt all the time what difference does it make?

Get it? The weight came after the arthritis. I was riding bikes and swimming and lifting weights and doing stairmaster almost every day. I was keeping the weight off. I gained a lot of weight after I woke up with the pain in my hips.

Capisce?

Art >>


Interesting question implied here----


Would Art live longer and be able to eat more over his remaining lifetime IF HE CONTROLLED HIS EATING HABITS, or if he didn't bother?


Seattle Pioneer
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<<I hadn't heard about that. Perhaps Art can tell us more about that? Best, Will


Last December I had my yearly physical and my blood sugar finally got up over the magic number of 130 so I was officially declared diabetic. My blood sugar was 146 and my A1C was 6.7. So my doctor says to me "well you're diabetic." Always before he'd say "you're pre-diabetic." That was enough to put the fear of god in me and make me start do something about my blood sugar. I cut way back on the carbs and sugars, no noodles or pasta, no bread, no potatoes, no rice, no corn, etc. and no ice cream or cake, etc. I'm trying to keep it down below 60 grams of carbs a day.

So far I've lost 4" in my waist. It's coming off slow. My body seems especially reluctant to lose it in my waist. Anyway diabetes doesn't seem like a fun way to go, having my feet amputated, going blind, or kidney failure and ending up on dialysis. No thanks! So it made me try and do something about it. My doctor didn't put me on any drugs right then so hopefully with me losing weight and seriously reducing my carb intake I can stay off an diabetes medication.


Art >>


I sincerely wish you the best in your campaign, Art.


Personally, I'm overweight too, but I've been able to keep my exe4rcise level up reasonably well and moderated my food consumption somewhat. Probably enough to earn one star (*), or perhaps two (**).

Better than none.... ( ).


Seattle Pioneer
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"Get it? The weight came after the arthritis. I was riding bikes and swimming and lifting weights and doing stairmaster almost every day. I was keeping the weight off. I gained a lot of weight after I woke up with the pain in my hips.

Capisce?

Art >> "


Unless you were playing football......240 lbs is still a very healthy adult weight......
and diet certainly can contribute to 'inflammation' which is what arthritis is.


t.
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Art writes,

Last December I had my yearly physical and my blood sugar finally got up over the magic number of 130 so I was officially declared diabetic.

</snip>


A few months ago I had some blood work done, and my glucose came back as 104. But I noticed that the lab was now saying the normal glucose level went up to 120, whereas before they considered 100 to be the top of the normal range.

I asked my doctor about it and he said, "It doesn't matter what the lab says, anything over 100 is "glucose impaired". Cut carbs out of your diet!"

intercst
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"Would Art live longer and be able to eat more over his remaining lifetime IF HE CONTROLLED HIS EATING HABITS, or if he didn't bother?" - Seattle Pioneer
-------------------------------------


Probably so but that's not the motivation. It's not being dead or when I die that scares me so much as "how I get there." Diabetes doesn't sound like a particularly attractive way to go. It's a long drawn out death with amputations, blindness, or kidney failure and dialysis.

See I have people who care and love me. I got family and friends and a wife and so I don't live for just myself. It has to do with that "life review" that so many near death experiencers talk about. Because of the connectedness and oneness feelings on the other side you feel all the pain and grief you caused others while you were here. During the life review you become the other person and feel what they felt while they interacted with you. People who try and commit suicide feel the grief of their loved ones.

excerpt from "the life review" on the near-death.com website,
"Instantly becoming everyone you came in contact with in your entire life (feeling their emotions, thinking their thoughts, living their experiences, learning their motives behind their actions)."
http://www.near-death.com/science/research/life-review.html

Art
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"I sincerely wish you the best in your campaign, Art. Personally, I'm overweight too, but I've been able to keep my exe4rcise level up reasonably well and moderated my food consumption somewhat. Probably enough to earn one star (*), or perhaps two (**). Better than none.... ( )." Seattle Pioneer
------------------

Thank you. I've been doing the low carb thing. I eat a LOT of chicken and salads. But also boneless pork loin chops, cooked veggies that are fairly low in carbs, etc. Just doing the best I can. For lunch today I cooked a couple of Italian sausage hot dogs and put them in some homemade spaghetti sauce with parmesan cheese melted on top. On Friday's I try and eat fish, not because I'm catholic but just because it seems like the traditional thing to do. A lot of school cafeterias serve fish on fridays.

So far so good. I've been sticking to it for 6 months. I've got a long way to go. I don't have a clue how much I've lost but I know I've lost some because of my clothes.

Art
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". On Friday's I try and eat fish, not because I'm catholic but just because it seems like the traditional thing to do. A lot of school cafeterias serve fish on fridays. "

***********************************************************

If you try to keep fish over the weekend, you will find out why
tradition sez "Fish on Friday"

Howie52
who has a nose for such things.
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"Unless you were playing football......240 lbs is still a very healthy adult weight......
and diet certainly can contribute to 'inflammation' which is what arthritis is." - tele

------------------------------


I'm guessing you meant to say "unhealthy adult weight?" <grin> I was beefed up like Arnold Schwarzenegger. I was a beast. Riding bikes, swimming, doing stairmaster, lifting weights, etc. I think it was that damn stairmaster that wore out my hips.

After I woke up with that burning pain in my hips was when I realized something was bad wrong and it probably wasn't going away. I went to the doctor over at UT Hospital and the Indian radiologist guy told me I had bad arthritis and eventually I was going to need a hip replacement. So far I've been able to put it off but eventually I might have to do it. My plan is to put it off as long as possible.

I'll never be what I once was. Those days are gone forever.

I'm doing the low carb thing now because diabetes sucks. It's a sucky way to go.

Art
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"I asked my doctor about it and he said, "It doesn't matter what the lab says, anything over 100 is "glucose impaired". Cut carbs out of your diet!" intercst


Every year my blood glucose level would inch up a little bit. 111, 116, 123, then last year 146. I knew what that meant. Also my A1C went from 6.0 to 6.7. I knew the good times were over. Always before my doctor would circle my blood glucose and tell me I was prediabetic and tell me to cut back on carbs but in my mind I'd think "pre-diabetic?" "Pre" means before and to my way of thinking everyone is "prediabetic?" So what? As long as I stayed pre diabetic I didn't worry about it.

It was when I had crossed the line and was declared full blown diabetic it scared me enough to try and cut way back on the carbs and sugar. I knew what I had to do, I just didn't give a shite enough to try. I just don't want to die of diabetes because diabetes sucks. Pure and simple. It's not dying or being death that scares me, it's how long it takes and how painful that I worry about. Personally I'd like to fall face down into a plate of spaghetti that sounds good to me.

Art
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"Every year my blood glucose level would inch up a little bit. 111, 116, 123, then last year 146. I knew what that meant. Also my A1C went from 6.0 to 6.7. I knew the good times were over. Always before my doctor would circle my blood glucose and tell me I was prediabetic and tell me to cut back on carbs but in my mind I'd think "pre-diabetic?" "Pre" means before and to my way of thinking everyone is "prediabetic?" So what? As long as I stayed pre diabetic I didn't worry about it. "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Art,

Being diabetic does not mean "the good times are over".
Far from it - although the times of "eating without thinking"
are pretty much kaput.
I have been diabetic since 1997 - Type 2. when I was diagnosed I
dropped my weight from 240 lbs to 180 lbs. People kept asking me
if I had cancer based on the weight loss. Since then I have jumped
on the diet wagon and fallen off the diet wagon several times - and
also the exercise wagon (at times they diverge from the same path).
I was a smoker at the time and continued as a smoker until 2001 when
I kicked that habit (should any smokers read this - try the "Quit Smoking"
board on TMF - not as many people posting there as there were but still
a help).
Diabetes can do terrible things - if not treated or ignored or if denied -
and sometimes regardless of what a person does. But you decide your
actions and how you view the disease. Care is needed - you have to watch
your feet, you have to watch any injury, you have to keep a degree of
balance in your habits.
And that is pretty much like everyone else.

DW also is diabetic - and she is having more difficulties. But we deal
with the problems as we can.
My mother had diabetes - (I contracted the disease at the same age that
she did) - and lost her eyesight eventually. Macular degeneration can
be a problem and eyesight is effected - you will want regular eye tests
if you don't already have them.
I have had cousins who lost limbs and continued to have diabetes related
problems until they died. Keep tract of cuts and bruises - and make sure
they heal. Blood flow is changed - and that is the cause of people
losing limbs.
If you go on meds, don't worry too much. They are not as bad as some folks
talk about - I am still not on insulin - meds diet and exercise. DW is on
insulin.

Howie52
Talk to a nutritionist - and listen to your doctor/s. There is a diabetes
board on TMF - but there are support sites everywhere anymore.
Bounce questions off me if you'd like and you think it might help.
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"If you try to keep fish over the weekend, you will find out why
tradition sez "Fish on Friday"

Way back when, when it was a bigger deal.....my family would have fish on Thursday. It was fresh.....the stores would get it in for Friday consumption/sales.

We had regular meals on Fridays....

t.
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Art:"I'm doing the low carb thing now because diabetes sucks. It's a sucky way to go."

And also being excessively overweight can be a problem.

Have a ham radio friend up in IN. Probably weighed 400 lb. same for wife. Definitely bloated.....and one day he got cut on foot...maybe a nail...or something as he was walking through a back yard as part of his job...... got infected.......and due to bad circulation in his foot.....they had to AMPUTATE it......

I think now he has lost 240 lbs...has an artificial foot.....


t.
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