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Where do we plan to live in retirement? Many people just plan to stay in their house until they die. This is awkward when we age and need some help. Just keeping the house clean may become a problem, or just remembering to take a bath. Then there is debilitating loss of strength or ability to walk. Some will encounter Alzheimer's or just senility. What are the alternatives?

We are considering moving into a Continuing Care Residential Community - CCRC. This is a relatively new concept. It's defined by law at least in California. There are four stages in the "Continuing Care" part. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuing_care_retirement_com...

At the first stage, you simply live there - "Independent Living". Typically at least some food service is provided, maybe some cleaning or care of the residence. If the need arises, they mist provide some assisted living features. This may be as little as being sure you take your meds, some physical therapy, etc. There is also memory care. Seems to mean care if you become senile or Alz. The last level is nursing care, for people no longer able to care properly for themselves. (This is the first thing that pops in to many people's minds when I mention a CCRC.)

We have visited and interviewed (and been interviewed by) several CCRC's. Seriously considering this one: http://carlsbadbythesea.org/ There are many similar communities, some smaller, some larger. Here is a rather large one: http://www.lacostaglen.com/ The larger ones are able to provide a larger palette of services and activities, of course.

The shock we encountered is that they are hugely expensive. Shockingly so, at least to us. Since we have no heirs and no desire to leave a multi-million dollar estate, we don't care.

Curious I am, abut others' plans? Are you a retire in place sort? Move to Mexico? What are your plans? Or do you have any plans?

CNC
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My mother moved into independent living about 10 years ago. I don't know how much is changed or how much is governed by state law etc. There are comments from our research then.

Independent living at many places is almost like an apartment. People live there, drive cars, take vacations, etc. Some have regular meal service, some have meal account and then allow you to spend your allowance at various levels. Or even invite friends for lunch. The main requirement is that you be able to respond to a fire alarm without assistance.

Next up is assisted living. Then staff can help with meds, dressing, bathing etc. Some independent living facilities provide additional assistance for additional fees.

If funds are limited, look into HUD housing. One retirement community here has four building of HUD housing and two "market rate" independent living buildings. The HUD apartments are efficiency style. One room with kitchenette and bathroom. But you can live there for a fraction of your income. So Social Security will pay for it. They have a waiting list and keep the HUD units full. Many move into independent living while they wait for a HUD vacancy.

There are communities that offer to keep you for all stages from independent living to nursing home care. Many take a large refundable deposit to start. The contract I have seen was over 100 pages. The fine print says the program assumes you have long term care insurance and you are responsible for anything not covered by insurance. They say they "won't put you out" when you run out of funds, but I suspect the refundable portion goes first.

Memory care is a special facility often with locked doors. Care is probably at the nursing home care level for most patients.

The best advice I think is live close to family if you can. They can help with many situations.
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I have three friends who live in continuing care facilities, one in Oregon, one near Philadelphia, and one here on Long Island. All three are vey happy with their “new” lives.

You’re right, these places are very expensive, but the friend in Oregon actually didn’t have to buy her cottage - she rents from a couple who are presently not living on the premises.

I don’t know the costs at the other two, but I investigated the Long Island facility, which is about an hour and a half further out on the island than I live. The purchase price for a spacious apartment with two master bedrooms and baths, a living room with a fireplace, and a full kitchen approaches $500,000, and when you die or move out, the facility “buys” the apartment back from your beneficiaries for 90% of your purchase price. As an alternative, you can purchase the same apartment for considerably less, but each month the amount your beneficiaries would get decreases, until three or four years after you move in, the amount dwindles to zero.

In addition there’s a pretty hefty monthly fee, which includes a meal plan, a bi-weekly cleaning person, snow shoveling and grounds keeping, and many activities - lectures, classes, gym and exercise classes in the pool, trips to local markets and malls, transportation to local doctors, etc. etc. Lots of social life.

I would move in to any of the three facilities I have seen in a heartbeat except for the fact that I’m lucky enough to live only a block from my daughter, and within a half hour drive from one son, and nothing can beat that! Six of my seven grandchildren are right nearby, although several are now off to college. My daughter and I cook dinner together almost every day, and my son and his family often come over for dinner on Sundays.

Years ago, I was caregiver to parents, in-laws, and an elderly aunt, all of whom lived everywhere in the USA except here, and boy, was it difficult! I was constantly flying somewhere to supervise daily life and/or medical care for one or another of them. I even took an earlier retirement than I would have chosen as caregiving became almost a full time job. I have known too many people who retired to places far from their families, and just a few years later, as they needed more and more assistance, life got very complicated for both themselves and for their kids.

Trini
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Trini: In addition there’s a pretty hefty monthly fee, which includes a meal plan, a bi-weekly cleaning person, snow shoveling and grounds keeping, and many activities - lectures, classes, gym and exercise classes in the pool, trips to local markets and malls, transportation to local doctors, etc. etc. Lots of social life.

Thanks for our response, Trini. Interesting to see that New York and California have similar arrangements. I am happy to mention that snow removal is included here. http://carlsbadbythesea.org/

CNC
😉
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The shock we encountered is that they are hugely expensive. Shockingly so, at least to us. Since we have no heirs and no desire to leave a multi-million dollar estate, we don't care.


My wife and I have been living at a CCRC now for 3 years and love it here.
When we moved here we told are children that we would be spending their inheritance.
Monthly fees increase annually about 4-5%.

https://covia.org/spring-lake-village/
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CNC,


The shock we encountered is that they are hugely expensive. Shockingly so, at least to us. Since we have no heirs and no desire to leave a multi-million dollar estate, we don't care.

Google search didn't turn up the pricing structure of the units themselves at Carlsbad by the Sea. Would you mind sharing the cost range of 2BR master suites with ocean views?

Thanks,

Bill
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Google search didn't turn up the pricing structure of the units themselves at Carlsbad by the Sea. Would you mind sharing the cost range of 2BR master suites with ocean views?

Thanks,

Bill


Hidden in with the floor plans.

http://carlsbadbythesea.org/

There are some ocean view apartments and some ocean front apartments.

CNC
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Try putting the zipcode into Zillow.com
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Hi CNC,

Hidden in with the floor plans.

Yes, I did note the below info:

"Entrance fees start as low as $119,000 and range from $3,830 to $7,300 monthly."

However, I imagine that the ocean view and ocean front units would have a significantly higher entrance fee from the low of $119,000. Do you have an idea what those fees might be??

Thank you,

Bill
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There is nothing shown for this CCRC. I believe they are only made available through the Carlsbad By The Sea organization via a CCRC contract.
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The shock we encountered is that they are hugely expensive. Shockingly so, at least to us. Since we have no heirs and no desire to leave a multi-million dollar estate, we don't care.

Very expensive in NE Ohio. Many have an up front fee (some returnable should you die) and then the high monthly fees. You get so many meals and the rest are on you. If you eat/drink in the "lounge" you pay. All extras, you pay. And then I heard the medical care is not all it is put up to be.

As I have previously stated, I hope to stay in my house. I have cleaning twice a month, mowing/leaf removal, etc. I understand there are some very good nursing services if I should need in home care. I know I would not do well in a nursing home facility.....I'm too stubborn and want my own way...and my dogs.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

Birgit
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As I have previously stated, I hope to stay in my house. I have cleaning twice a month, mowing/leaf removal, etc. I understand there are some very good nursing services if I should need in home care. I know I would not do well in a nursing home facility.....I'm too stubborn and want my own way...and my dogs.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

Birgit


I wish people could see some of the houses I have seen in our window fashions business. An old person living alone. Some physical and mental decay. Driving is out of the question due to the decay, including eyesight and reaction time, and ability to judge distance and speed. Live in care taker. Some pets. One man had to navigate me through the maze of stacked magazines and newspapers he hadn't gotten around to reading yet, just to find the windows. In case of mental decay, the pets can be worse than nothing, it we don't clean up for them.

As long as we are healthy and not afflicted with senility or Alz, it's not outrageous to want to continue to live in our house. But it's sad when we start to decay either physically or mentally. Not able to visit friends like before.

We like this place: https://carlsbadbythesea.org/ Yes, large move-in fee. Then large monthly fee. This one allows two (small) pets. But, you know what? As the saying goes, you can't take it with you. We want to make our final years as comfortable and enjoyable as we can. We hope to make friends in the new environs. There are activities to fit just about every taste.

But, tastes differ. It's not a one size fits all situation. We feel we can afford the comfort (luxury) of this kind of place, and we may need the support structure that comes with it, so why not?

CNC
... Do you live in/around Ashtabula? I can assure you that Southern California is much more expensive. But the heating bills in winter are less. 😂
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