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No. of Recommendations: 2
Nice try to sell all the loosers like Yahoo at the bottom to make your tables look nice. Let them stay in the portfolio so everyday you will be reminded how foolish you were going into these stocks. You did not prove to be anything but your average investor if not below that.
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No. of Recommendations: 24
Nice try to sell all the loosers like Yahoo at the bottom to make your tables look nice.


I guess this statement just illustrates some of the difficulties of running an online portfolio out in full view of the community. If and when you buy a stock, you catch hell because you bought the wrong company or at the wrong price. If and when you sell a stock, you catch hell because you sold at the wrong price or for the wrong reasons. No wonder there has been so much turnover in the management of the Rule Maker portfolio recently ... I'd get tired of dealing with the endless bashing, too.

Let's all take a deep breath, and remember the following facts:

1) All historical transactions for the Rule Maker portfolio are available from the following link:

http://www.fool.com/portfolios/RuleMaker/RuleMakerTransactionhistory.htm

This list includes everything from the initial buys of MSFT and PFE, the purchase of JDSU at $100.75 and subsequent sale at $21.61, and all the averaging down with YHOO. If you think this is no big deal, just go to any mutual fund website and look for something similar. With the possible exception of OpenFund (http://funds.metamarkets.com/openfund/index.jhtml), I think you will be horribly disappointed.

2) If you are interested in the historical performance of the portfolio on a year by year basis, that is available from the following link:

http://www.fool.com/portfolios/PortfolioQuickFacts.htm

Regardless of what stocks are in the portfolio now and how they have performed, you can see that the portfolio returned 30.14% in 1998 (slightly ahead of the S&P 500), 41.50% in 1999 (almost double the S&P 500), and -35.58% in 2000 (drastically below the S&P 500).

Yes, we could sell all the companies in the port that are currently in the red to make our "tables look nice", but it wouldn't affect these numbers one way or the other. They are what they are ... end of story.


Regardless of how baseless these claims of dishonesty or "hidden agendas" may be, I think it may be worthwhile to do something to cut down on the noise on the message boards about this subject. You know, if you repeat something often enough, some people begin to treat it as truth (and if don't believe that one, then I guess you have been oblivious to American politics for the last twenty years). Therefore, I am going to suggest to the powers that be that we add another table to the portfolio daily numbers section that lists those stocks that are no longer in the portfolio, along with the initial cost basis and subsequent sale price for all to see. That way, we can finally put to rest all of these charges of "window dressing" and what not.

Just my rambling two cents.

the LanceMan
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No. of Recommendations: 3

>>>
>>Nice try to sell all the loosers like Yahoo at the bottom to make >>your tables look nice.


>I guess this statement just illustrates some of the difficulties of >running an online portfolio out in full view of the community.
>>

I can see you that you're sensitive to charges that you are burying your losers. It must be hitting close to home.

You have the following table in each of your RM reports (the following one is cut and paste from the most recent column).

By not including past components of the RM in this table, you are effectively de-emphasising them (aka burying them) with respect to the current components of the port. Since you have a tendency to sell your most terrible losers and keep the winners, the chart tends to be filled with winning stocks.

To resolve this deficiency, you should either:

a) simply list the stocks (and associated quantity) owned by the port. Nothing else.

b) list all stocks ever owned by the portfolio in this same chart.

Best wishes,


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Trade Date # Shares Ticker Total Cost Current Value Total Gain
2/3/98 59 MSFT $2,911.79 $4,081.62 $1,169.83
2/3/98 66 PFE $1,810.57 $2,830.74 $1,020.17
5/26/98 66 AXP $2,375.95 $2,779.92 $403.97
2/3/98 75 TROW $2,559.06 $2,751.75 $192.69
4/3/01 5 JNJ $436.50 $484.75 $48.25
2/13/98 147 INTC $4,033.23 $3,970.47 ($62.76)
8/21/98 44 SGP $2,111.70 $1,845.80 ($265.90)
2/27/98 27 KO $1,865.89 $1,279.80 ($586.09)
6/23/98 182 CSCO $4,498.75 $3,505.32 ($990.40)
2/15/00 132 NOK $5,307.79 $3,859.68 ($1,448.11)
2/17/99 106 YHOO $6,105.72 $1,919.66 ($4,186.06)
Cash:
Total: $30.20
$29,339.71





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No. of Recommendations: 2
The bottom??? I don't think so YHOO will be at $4 soon enough. Look at their financials, all their assets are goodwill and stock in other overpriced internet co's. Better to sell now, and invest in something a little more tried and true. Also, it would be a good idea to buy UNDERvalued stocks. Look at the earnings. If their P/E is a zillion, odds are that it is OVERvalued. Especially if they don't have anything the other guy doesn't, which YHOO clearly doesn't.
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