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I just had a friend ask me about Linux. His old Compaq was trashed by downloading a copy of IE5 this weekend. He is planning on replacing the machine, but wants to try Linux. From all I have seen thus far, Corel and Caldera 2.3 offer the smoothest installs for a dual-boot environment.

Any recommendations for a Linux newbie?

Barry
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Any recommendations for a Linux newbie?

Yes. If you have a friend who isn't as much as a newbie as you, run the same distribution they run--you'll be able to teach each other. Failing that, run Red Hat. You'll find support most easily that way.

All in my personal opinion.

Sumner
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just had a friend ask me about Linux. His old Compaq was trashed by downloading
a copy of IE5 this weekend. He is planning on replacing the machine, but wants to try
Linux. From all I have seen thus far, Corel and Caldera 2.3 offer the smoothest
installs for a dual-boot environment.

Any recommendations for a Linux newbie?


I use Red Hat 6.2 but I heard that Corel's is the simplest to install for newbies, is he gonna install in his old Compaq? If so, why have a dual boot at all? I have 2 computers, one runs Windows95 (mainly so I can use Quicken) and the other runs Linux, I used to have a dual boot, but always run into one problem or other.

This way its better, since I use Linux for the internet and the security it offers is much greater.
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I also run Red Hat.

I haven't tried Corel.

My brother runs Caldera. He just got hacked. As I was investigating, I found that Caldera puts some really insecure scripts in /home/httpd/cgi-bin. One of them lets anyone with a web browser query what rpms you have installed on your system. I'm afraid I won't be able to recommend Caldera. :-/

Those running Caldera might want to take a look at that directory and try out the various scripts.

Simon
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Corel is the best bet for a newbie. Real men use Slackware.
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"I use Red Hat 6.2"

Just curious where you got it. Seen no mention of it, not a peep from even slashdot.

Rob Nelson
ronelson@vt.edu
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>I have 2 computers, one runs Windows95 (mainly so I >can use Quicken) and the other runs Linux, I used to >have a dual boot, but always run into one problem or >other.

He was so frustrated with Compaq's propriotary configuration that he just decided he would give to
his son. He does have some aps (i.e. Quicken) that
he wants to continue using while he learns Linux.

And yes, I am also very new to Linux. I opted to get
a machine which was preloaded with Caldera 2.2. I have been spending the past few months trying to make the transistion from a win/dos mode of thinking to
that of Linux.

Barry

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And yes, I am also very new to Linux. I opted to get
a machine which was preloaded with Caldera 2.2. I have been spending the past few months trying to make the transistion from a win/dos mode of thinking to
that of Linux.


Beautiful ain't it? Welcome to the fold Barry and friend! I, myself, use RedHat 6.0. It works like a champ.
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I have found RedHat's installs fairly easy. I have only upgraded with 6.1's gui, but it was a piece of cake on my server and laptop.

Been buying my RedHat cd's from Cheapbytes for 1yr+, $6.99 inc. shipping ... very cool.

jbw
zorloc@imperium.org
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Real men use Slackware.

Slackware has been, in my experience, very slow to ship security updates and unwilling to ship up-to-date versions of other packages. Personally, I prefer Debian and Red Hat. Using a package manager is a bit of a pain compared to installing tar files, but the intrusion detection capabilities and uninstall that you get make it worth the extra effort.

Slackware was really nice years ago, and I'm amazed at what Patrick is able to do with it; not having a big group supporting it (like Red Hat and Debian do) shows, though.

Sumner

When I was a kid, we used to dream of something like Slackware. SLS was a godsend when it finally came out...
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