No. of Recommendations: 10
When Lion (Mac OS 10.7) appeared, Apple removed Snow Leopard from the Apple Store. This was a pity -- Snow Leopard (10.6.x) is not only a great operating system, it also represents the pinnacle of development for a particular user-interface philosophy. After Snow Leopard, Apple began to evolve a very different philosophy: one driven by gestures on a track pad or touch screen rather than mouse clicks, and informed by the radical file-structure simplification pioneered by the iPhone and iPad.

I have to admit that I like the gestural thing -- there is no going back after experiencing the Magic Mouse -- but the new ways of interacting with the file system leave me cold and angry. To my mind it represents the worst of Microsoftism -- the part in which the user is treated like a dummy. To see where we are headed, open TextEdit and type in a few words. Now quit TextEdit. There is no dialog asking you if you want to save your work! Open TextEdit again, weeks or months later, and there is your file. But WHERE has it been, really? You don't know! Worse, Time Machine has probably archived a copy of it somewhere. Had you wanted to write a secure note for your eyes only, that security is just completely gone. In the old pre-Lion days, anything you type into TextEdit remains in volatile RAM memory until you explicitly save it, and it goes only into the saved file -- whose location you know. That's gone, and more changes like this are in the pipeline.

I understand that many users of computers are in fact elderly or brain-limited, and that they need something simpler than the old ways of interacting with the file system, but let's keep the old way available for those of us with no such limitations, and let's keep security in mind.

Okay, enough of the ranting already. Getting to the point:

Under user pressure, Apple has quietly put Snow Leopard back in the Apple Store, for just $20. That's a terrific price for a stable, efficient, and well-designed operating system. Since Snow Leopard is the last of its breed, it might be a good idea to keep a physical copy around, in case Apple goes completely off the rails with these "new" ideas.

Loren
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Interesting. I had heard something about the file system before, but never really followed through on it. So are you telling me this is Text Edit only, or is it across all programs?

I haven't contemplated an upgrade for the MB yet, but any new computer would start with ML..
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Loren wrote Under user pressure, Apple has quietly put Snow Leopard back in the Apple Store . . .

Maybe it was user pressure. Maybe it was the desire to not end sales to people of people whose iOS devices will not run iOS version 6

http://www.macrumors.com/2012/11/21/os-x-10-6-snow-leopard-a...

Gordon
Atlanta
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No. of Recommendations: 2
I had heard something about the file system before, but never really followed through on it. So are you telling me this is Text Edit only, or is it across all programs?

Developers have been told by Apple to start implementing this feature, and other similar ideas. Some are faster at this process than others. Dinosaurs like MS Word will be the slowest.

I guess it might be important to stress that even in the iPhone's iOS, where these ideas originated, the old file system is still there -- it's just invisible to ordinary mortals. Apple and others are trying hard to simplify the user experience, but they are not actually tampering with the underlying file structure. On any modern Mac you can always drop down into no-holds-barred Unix, simply by opening a Terminal session.

Part of the new philosophy, as I understand it, is that each application should "manage" the files that it creates. On Apple systems, this management will be implemented under strict Apple guidelines, but it is still one hell of a change. You can see this philosophy in action most clearly on an iPad. If you create a file with an app, it is not typically visible to other apps. You have to open it with the original app, and then explicitly transfer it to some other particular app. That's nuts to us oldsters, but to those for whom an iPhone is their first computer, it seems both simple and sensible.

Loren
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Loren I grabbed the wrong link for my previous post in this thread.

Here is the Link I meant to post.

http://www.macworld.co.uk/mac/news/?newsid=3412575

Gordon
Atlanta
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I guess it might be important to stress that even in the iPhone's iOS, where these ideas originated, the old file system is still there -- it's just invisible to ordinary mortals. Apple and others are trying hard to simplify the user experience, but they are not actually tampering with the underlying file structure. On any modern Mac you can always drop down into no-holds-barred Unix, simply by opening a Terminal session.

Part of the new philosophy, as I understand it, is that each application should "manage" the files that it creates. On Apple systems, this management will be implemented under strict Apple guidelines, but it is still one hell of a change. You can see this philosophy in action most clearly on an iPad. If you create a file with an app, it is not typically visible to other apps. You have to open it with the original app, and then explicitly transfer it to some other particular app. That's nuts to us oldsters, but to those for whom an iPhone is their first computer, it seems both simple and sensible.

Loren
__________________

I'll just present this as I now use files.

Office programs now can open anything you can see if it's Possible the program can open it. I use Excel for opening and converting .csv and other text files, A LOT. I also use Word and Pages to open each other's files. I also use the Pages app to save files as Word files.

This won't change right?
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