No. of Recommendations: 6
So anyway, I am wondering what your thoughts are about ways that we can help, whether it is financial or something else.

In addition to public assistance, she should also check into "Ministries" that churches in her area might offer, as well as any help the school counselor can provide.

Breaking down each:
1) Every year our school sends out - to every student - a list of ways the community can help, how to get in touch with the agency or charity that can help that way, and if you are unable to do that yourself, how to get in touch with the school's counselor to assist you. She should reach out to the school her 2nd grader is in, and ask the counselor what kind of help she can get. The list published at our school covers everything from clothing and food to free dentistry, for parents and students alike.

2) Churches (at least around here!) sometimes have an "X ministry" that helps community members, where "X" is whatever a Member is eager to provide or a church itself feels strongly about. Sometimes that's something like clothing/food, but sometimes it's a car ministry that helps with maintenance, or someone that's excellent at navigating local/state government assistance paperwork to go with and guide an applicant.

The hardest part on each of those is asking, and I'm not downplaying how hard that might be for her to do. But they are probably the most immediate way for her to get assistance.

I also feel obligated to mention that child support can and will be withheld from disability payments - if the child's father is receiving those, she should check with her county on how to get that withheld and sent to her. Yes, it will be a minuscule amount....but every dollar counts.

impolite
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Unfortunately, a case study in why teen age sex is not recommended.


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
LOL, SP.
I saw a case study for why we USians need universal health care. But, that's another instance where my opinion differs.

The comment "some education"... Reminded me of the adage "when the student is ready, the teacher will appear". ThyPeace will teach some things, the main teacher, though, is "life and the school of hard knocks".

Perhaps a go-fund-me effort might collect enough funds to relieve some of the immediate finances pressure?

I saw health issues that are based in physical issues, but exacerbated by stress. Perhaps learning to meditate, and/or using the techniques taught in PTSD clinics, etc, might help decrease the stress, and alleviate some of the physical symptoms? Obviously there are Drs/nurses involved, but is/are there counselors also working with her?

Change the names, location, a FEW other details, and the story describes several acquaintances of mine, here in Texas.

Life's lessons are especially tough when overlain with health issues.

😐
ralph
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 8
She just started working again and gets her first paycheck this Friday. She'll be paid, before taxes, $132. (She worked 12 hours last week, having started on Thursday.)

Does she have other income this year? Filing Head of Household with 1 dependent and having an $11/hour job for the rest of the year, it is likely that she will be eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), depending on her other income. You might want to go through this IRS Publication with her https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p5334.pdf

How did she fill out her W-4? You may want to go over that with her, because if she can claim exemption from withholding, it will help boost her paycheck.

If she was eligible for EITC in 2016, 2017 and/or 2018, but didn't claim it, she can file an amended return for those years. (If she just didn't file for any of those years, she can just file an original return.) Here is a webpage from the IRS that can help figure those years out https://www.irs.gov/credits-deductions/individuals/earned-in...

To get help with EITC issues, I would suggest that she go to TaxAide. Because it's no longer tax season, they don't have any sites open at this point. However, by submitting a question about how to file for EITC in prior years here https://taxaideqa.aarp.org/hc/en-us/requests/new she may be able to get in contact with someone who can help her with any prior returns.

When she needs to file her taxes for 2019, she should definitely use the TaxAide locator https://secure.aarp.org/applications/VMISLocator/searchTaxAi... - she will be able to get her taxes done for free, and they may be able to point her to additional services in her area.

I believe that the second grader gets free breakfast and lunch at school, which helps a little for him.

Is he on CHIP for health insurance? Is she eligible for Medicaid in her state for insurance, and if so, is she already on it? If she's not eligible, is she eligible for subsidized ACA coverage?

AJ
- TaxAide volunteer who helps many people claim EITC, including for prior years
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Before helping with medical bills or cost, see how the TANF application goes. If she's not eligible for some reason they should still look at eligibility for Medicaid. Definitely help with encouraging her to gather paperwork, respond to letters, etc. during the process (which can be daunting). If she plans (or will need) to file for disability, she'll need quite a bit of documentation, or at least starting points for an agency to request records, so encouragement and/or follow-up on gathering medical info in one place would be a good thing.

In the immediate situation, establishment-specific gift cards (grocery store card, gas card) may be better than money or a Visa/MC gift card and shouldn't be counted as income or assets.

Good luck,

cm

Note: google her state's TANF regs on "are gift cards income?" The USDA says no, if establishment-specific, for SNAP, but doesn't cover what a state's TANF program does
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
Unfortunately, a case study in why teen age sex is not recommended.

Seems to me that the 2nd grader is the least of her problems. The biggest issue is her health, because it is the cause of much/most of her debt and it's an ongoing issue potentially impacting her future earnings potential.

Fuskie
Who would recommend working with a consumer debt advocate to help that weight on her shoulders a little easier to bear, and to work on replacing that pride with looking for and taking any financial, mental or other support she can get...

-----
Ticker Guide: The Walt Disney Company (DIS), Intuit (INTU), Live Nation (LYV), CME Group (CME), MongoDB (MDB), Trip Advisor (TRIP), Vivendi SA (VIVHY), Mimecast (MIME), DHX Media (DHXM), Royce Micro Capital Trust (RMT)
Disclaimer: This post is non-professional and should not be construed as direct, individual or accurate advice
Disclosure: May own shares of some, many or all of the companies mentioned in this post (tinyurl.com/FuskieDisclosure)
Fool Code of Conduct: https://www.fool.com/legal/the-motley-fools-rules.aspx#Condu...
Call to Action: If you like this or any other post, Rec it. Better yet, reply to it. Even better, start your own thread. This is YOUR TMF Community!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
<<No. of Recommendations: 4
Unfortunately, a case study in why teen age sex is not recommended.

Seems to me that the 2nd grader is the least of her problems>>


Actually, I'd say that the child is a major part of the problem, since the child is the one party who didn't contribute to the mess being described.


Still, cobbling together various aid programs is probably the best that can be done, and the advice on how to do that is probably helpful.


The young woman might be expected to be overwhelmed with her difficulties and barely functioning.


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
LOL, SP.
I saw a case study for why we USians need universal health care. But, that's another instance where my opinion differs.



That doesn't mean your opinions differ. It just means you had different first reactions. In order for your opinions to differ, you would have to think teenage pregnancy is a good idea.

xtn
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Thanks, all, for the thoughts and suggestions. A few questions are answered below:

Does she have other income this year?

Yes, some. She worked part time for roughly the first 3-4 months of the year. Prior to that, she had worked full time for the previous 4 years and had even been given increased responsibilities in that time.

How did she fill out her W-4?

Good question. I will ask her about that and have also asked her about the EITC from previous years. I'm pretty sure she filed her taxes each year. I'm not sure if she did them herself or had help. I'll point her to TaxAide when it's time to do her taxes.

Is he on CHIP for health insurance? Is she eligible for Medicaid in her state for insurance, and if so, is she already on it? If she's not eligible, is she eligible for subsidized ACA coverage?

She is covered under a parent's health insurance. I don't know if she's eligible for Medicaid or additional assistance, nor do I know how the second-grader's health insurance is covered. More questions to ask.

Before helping with medical bills or cost, see how the TANF application goes. If she's not eligible for some reason they should still look at eligibility for Medicaid. Definitely help with encouraging her to gather paperwork, respond to letters, etc. during the process (which can be daunting). If she plans (or will need) to file for disability, she'll need quite a bit of documentation, or at least starting points for an agency to request records, so encouragement and/or follow-up on gathering medical info in one place would be a good thing.

Yeah, I have been on the work side of disability claims when people had to leave work, and it has been really ugly. In one case, the person was literally unable to get out of bed with a rare autoimmune disorder and the claims were denied because the adjudicators had never heard of the illness. It took far too long to straighten that mess out.

In the immediate situation, establishment-specific gift cards (grocery store card, gas card) may be better than money or a Visa/MC gift card and shouldn't be counted as income or assets.

My read of the state rules is that they do count as income, but a payment of debt as a gift does not. DH and I are keeping an eye on that, particularly for her ongoing PT and meds. She is first going to apply for assistance for those costs as well, with the places that she is going to. So I'll help her with that and with reminders to get it done.

Who would recommend working with a consumer debt advocate to help that weight on her shoulders a little easier to bear, and to work on replacing that pride with looking for and taking any financial, mental or other support she can get...

Ah, this is a good idea. Now... remind me so that I don't steer her in the wrong direction. Debt consolidators are bad, I know. What's the name of a reputable good company that could help her for free?

Still, cobbling together various aid programs is probably the best that can be done, and the advice on how to do that is probably helpful.

The young woman might be expected to be overwhelmed with her difficulties and barely functioning.


Yup. This is a situation where unwinding the debt comes second to stabilizing the people's lives. I figure I'll be talking to her for a decade or more after her life is stable to get the debt taken care of. That's okay. I'm not going anywhere.

ThyPeace, she had PT yesterday. Her pelvis has been returned to a more natural position. Now we'll see how long that lasts while she's working. (They had gotten it to the point where it would last a couple of days before re-rotating, but that was with her doing much less activity.)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
She is covered under a parent's health insurance.

With a 2nd grader who's probably 7 or 8, if she had him at 17, she's likely approaching the time when she can't be covered under a parent's insurance - that typically ends on your 26th birthday. Something else to be aware of.

What's the name of a reputable good company that could help her for free?

You should refer her to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC) www.nfcc.org to look for a credit counselor. NFCC accredits credit counselors.

AJ
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Yup, DH and I are aware she'll age out soon -- DH's sons are in that process now, and even when you are gainfully employed or in school, it's a challenge. It's already on the list to talk to her about.

National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC) www.nfcc.org

Thanks. This is now on the list for our next chat, too.

ThyPeace, the next chat is on Sunday. Trying not to deluge her with stuff between now and then.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 7
SeattlePioneer,

You wrote, Unfortunately, a case study in why teen age sex is not recommended.

I don't know ... I recall teenage sex quite fondly and wish I'd had more of it. ;-)

On the other hand I would recommend being careful and using protection. Having a child at an early age can ruin your life, or at the very least derail your career path and set you back irreparably. (Unless you and/or your parents are quite wealthy and can use it to support you and your child.)

- Joel
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I don't know ... I recall teenage sex quite fondly and wish I'd had more of it. ;-)


Same. It think it's teen getting preggers and then going through with birth that should not be recommended.

xtn
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
So anyway, I am wondering what your thoughts are about ways that we can help, whether it is financial or something else.

In addition to public assistance, she should also check into "Ministries" that churches in her area might offer, as well as any help the school counselor can provide.

Breaking down each:
1) Every year our school sends out - to every student - a list of ways the community can help, how to get in touch with the agency or charity that can help that way, and if you are unable to do that yourself, how to get in touch with the school's counselor to assist you. She should reach out to the school her 2nd grader is in, and ask the counselor what kind of help she can get. The list published at our school covers everything from clothing and food to free dentistry, for parents and students alike.

2) Churches (at least around here!) sometimes have an "X ministry" that helps community members, where "X" is whatever a Member is eager to provide or a church itself feels strongly about. Sometimes that's something like clothing/food, but sometimes it's a car ministry that helps with maintenance, or someone that's excellent at navigating local/state government assistance paperwork to go with and guide an applicant.

The hardest part on each of those is asking, and I'm not downplaying how hard that might be for her to do. But they are probably the most immediate way for her to get assistance.

I also feel obligated to mention that child support can and will be withheld from disability payments - if the child's father is receiving those, she should check with her county on how to get that withheld and sent to her. Yes, it will be a minuscule amount....but every dollar counts.

impolite
Print the post Back To Top