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So if I miss it deliberately and get there by another means suddenly I owe them money? I don't think so.

If it was a direct flight where you should not have left the plane then it is causing a problem for the airline. They have to determine which passenger is missing and if they had checked luggage. This could delay departure of the flight causing problems for any passenger with a connecting flight.
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Read your contract of carriage when buying a ticket and be prepared to lose any FF points if you decide to skirt the rules. There is transparency - it just takes some reading.

Strangely enough, two one ways can be as cheap or cheaper as can mulit-city pricing.
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Apparently the court thought that Lufthansa's terms were not transparent, as that is what they said in their ruling (per the article). And further that their ticket pricing was also opaque.

It may be somewhat airline-dependent. Dunno.

I also have to wonder if the "contract" is not unlike a EULA: no one reads it, and it is not expected by the courts that they do (there was a ruling about that not long ago with respect to a software EULA).

I don't know if I've ever read one completely. Of course, I've also never tried the hidden city trick. I think the only time I ever actually see it is when I get my confirmation email which gives the itinerary and then tells me stuff about not being able to change the ticket without penalty, schedules may change, etc. By then it's too late, I already have the reservation. So at most I glance at it, and usually not even that.

Sacrificing FF points might be an annoyance, but being forced to pay the equivalent of $2000 plus interest strikes me as ludicrous. Lufthansa should, IMO, lose their appeal. To me (and apparently the court, though I haven't read the actual judgment) I paid for a seat on a plane. If I don't use it, that's my loss. It's not as if they have an empty seat that is unpaid. I paid for it. Whether or not I get off at a layover-stop is my business. They wouldn't charge me if I failed to show up for a flight. They would just give my seat to someone on standby, and not refund my money. Basically the same thing here.
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Sacrificing FF points might be an annoyance,

Not just for that trip - all of them and excluded from the program in the future.

It would be more than annoyance to me to sacrifice 250,000 miles.

I was trying to remember if I have ever done this. Never intentionally but twice did not complete trips as booked. I did let the airline know before the flight. Once was when I was living in Steamboat Springs and I didn't take the last leg from Denver to Steamboat(can't remember the rest of the circumstances). The other was a rt DEN to BOS where the return was a month later than the first flight. I ended up booking a one way to Chicago to pick up a car and drive it home. I also called on that one and there was some tiny value left if I paid a change fee to use it later.

You've made it clear that you don't take a contract seriously and think this will somehow save money. You didn't pay for a seat on a plane - you paid for transportation from point A to point B.
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I have, a number of times booked round-trips which can be a fraction of the one-way cost and thrown away the return trip. More recently, I found that if you cancel a flight, even a non-refundable one, you should be reimbursed the taxes and luggage fees for the trip not taken. I have never tried this with a return leg that I'm not taking.

Jeff
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I wouldn't say I don't take contracts seriously, but these are more like EULAs that few people take seriously. And the courts more and more are siding with people on this.

Note that I've never done the hidden city technique. I've heard about it, but never done it. Apparently you can save money doing it.

...you paid for transportation from point A to point B

A distinction without a difference. If I fail to get to point B, that's my problem. Not theirs. If I miss the plane I'm sure they wouldn't refund any portion of my fare. They might get me on the next flight, or they might charge me for another ticket for the missed leg. So if I miss it deliberately and get there by another means suddenly I owe them money? I don't think so.

The airlines are merely suffering the consequence of their bizarre and opaque fare system.

Yes, the loss of all FF miles if you have a bunch built-up would suck. However, I suspect they are within their rights to kick you out of the program.
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Yes, the loss of all FF miles if you have a bunch built-up would suck. However, I suspect they are within their rights to kick you out of the program.

If you are going to do this, they always recommend not booking the flight with your FF number.

One mistake this guy made is that he booked the last leg home on Lufthansa, so they had him dead to rights. Had he gone home on another airline he might have been able to make up a plausible excuse.
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...you paid for transportation from point A to point B

A distinction without a difference.


This was in reference to you stating you bought a seat that the airline would be able to reuse.

The airlines are merely suffering the consequence of their bizarre and opaque fare system.

Maybe we could go back to regulation and airfares that really were a fortune...

However, I suspect they are within their rights to kick you out of the program.

Of course they are - you can read all those stories at flyertalk.

Personally, I usually save money by paying attention to postings and/or set up flight alerts.
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Sadly transportation is one item we haven't made progress in, in terms of getting from your house to your destination faster. It is safer but in the last ~40 years between traffic, security, etc. I think the time involved in going the same distance has gotten worse (both in the air and on the ground).

Of course from what I've seen, airfares have actually gone down, so maybe you get what you pay for.

I was reading a story about the Lion Air crash with the 737Max and the scary part there is how the FAA went along with Boeing and didn't require additional training for the changes. The European authorities at first disagreed but eventually went along. Brazil disagreed and actually required more training and better disclosure of the MCAS software that was added.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/03/world/asia/lion-air-plane...

Mistakes all around. I remember watching Air Disasters (history channel?) and in the vast majority of them, it wasn't a single mistake that caused the loss of life but a combination of events.

And back to the original topic, usually it isn't the person that throws away a segment once in a while, it is the people that do it constantly that draw the attention of the airlines. Kind of like how one airline (Lufthansa I believe), sued and won money from a guy who constantly bought refundable tickets to use their lounge in Munich but never flew and just got the ticket refunded each time (~35 times).
https://www.flyertalk.com/the-gate/blog/29761-man-rebooks-ti...

Rich
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So if I miss it deliberately and get there by another means suddenly I owe them money? I don't think so.

If it was a direct flight where you should not have left the plane then it is causing a problem for the airline. They have to determine which passenger is missing and if they had checked luggage. This could delay departure of the flight causing problems for any passenger with a connecting flight.
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