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No. of Recommendations: 8
OS X also brings with it Cocoa—a new set of tools for writing desktop applications. These tools evolved from NeXTStep, the development framework for the NeXT computer. I wrote a book about NeXTStep back in 1993, so perhaps I'm biased. But practically all the programmers I knew told me they could write applications with NeXTStep five to 10 times faster than they could for Windows. If Cocoa is even half as good as NeXTStep (and initial indications are that it is better), we could see an explosion of high-quality applications written by individuals or extremely small companies. This means that OS X has the power to revolutionize the software industry.
http://www.techreview.com/magazine/oct01/garfinkel.asp

this is a nice little gNutshell of stuff.

][
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No. of Recommendations: 3
I went through the "Programming in Cocoa" book from O'Reilly a few weekends ago, as well as the "Programming Cocoa Java applications" document from Apple's web site. It really is incredibly cool. It makes me want to find something to program again just so I can use it. It's almost like programming in Hypercard but with completely professional output.

Jerry
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No. of Recommendations: 2
These tools evolved from NeXTStep, the development framework for the NeXT computer.

Not to be picky, but NextStep was the operating system, and AppKit/Foundation were the tools.

But practically all the programmers I knew told me they could write applications with NeXTStep five to 10 times faster than they could for Windows.

This is probably very true, but also a bit of an oversimplification. If your app is largely dominated GUI design aspects, Cocoa is a huge win, but obviously if you're spending most of your work writing "guts" code, then it's not as huge a win.

If Cocoa is even half as good as NeXTStep (and initial indications are that it is better),

It's definitely better in some regards, but quite a few NextStep grognards are upset because some key features and tools are missing (such as the help librarian).

we could see an explosion of high-quality applications written by individuals or extremely small companies.

Yep, just like we saw similar explosions for Amiga, NextStep and BeOS. Applications are important, but so is an installed base.

This means that OS X has the power to revolutionize the software industry

It's _possible_, but I don't think it's likely. There is a huge amount of programmer resistance to learning new platforms, languages, tools and frameworks, and developing for Cocoa requires all of the above. There are going to be a lot of prejudiced Windows or Unix coders that are going to want to stick with what they know: C/C++, MFC/X, Win32/Unix. They don't want to move to a new platform because of a nebulous and subjective improvement in efficiency.

All our tools are being developed in Cocoa, although our client/server code is written portably in C++ and thus doesn't leverage Cocoa/Obj-C. Still, the ugly part of tool development (GUI coding) is pretty much eradicated from our schedule.

-LongHook
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Herr Herring quotes an article by Simson Garfinkel:

OS X also brings with it Cocoa—a new set of tools for writing desktop applications. These tools evolved from NeXTStep, the development framework for the NeXT computer. I wrote a book about NeXTStep back in 1993, so perhaps I'm biased. But practically all the programmers I knew told me they could write applications with NeXTStep five to 10 times faster than they could for Windows. If Cocoa is even half as good as NeXTStep (and initial indications are that it is better), we could see an explosion of high-quality applications written by individuals or extremely small companies. This means that OS X has the power to revolutionize the software industry.
http://www.techreview.com/magazine/oct01/garfinkel.asp

In fact, Cocoa is NeXTStep, with a whole lot of enhancements and the Aqua HI (developed at Apple, not at NeXT as Garfinkel thinks).

We will see an explosion of small, simple, but cool applications written in Cocoa, and that is a good thing. But it's still the case that when you're writing a heavy-duty, innovative application, the best frameworks and tools in the world (and that would be Cocoa) can only help you to a certain extent.

crassfool
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