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I read an article about vitamins in fish, and fish pills that were being recommended as a preventive device against heart disease. I asked my doctor about it and he said he was unconvinced by the clinical studies, but that many doctors subscribed to it. Bottom line was that if I did not mind fish breath, go ahead but he was not recommending it and to stick with the Prinavil and aspirin.
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You're doctor's behind the power curve, in my view. Omega-3 fatty acid evidence..and it's lack in the American diet....is pretty clear. The main sources are fatty ocean fish (e.g., salmon), and flax seed. (Note: turns out that farm-raised salmon....besides not even having the pink color...also aren't rich in Omega-3s).

JP
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I read an article about vitamins in fish, and fish pills that were being recommended as a preventive device against heart disease. I asked my doctor about it and he said he was unconvinced by the clinical studies, but that many doctors subscribed to it. Bottom line was that if I did not mind fish breath, go ahead but he was not recommending it and to stick with the Prinavil and aspirin.

There was initial excitement that the Omega-3 fatty acids found in some fish oils might be cardioprotective but the evidence is not particularly convincing. That said, Omega-3's can be effective for lowering triglycerides.

ab
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There was initial excitement that the Omega-3 fatty acids found in some fish oils might be cardioprotective but the evidence is not particularly convincing. That said, Omega-3's can be effective for lowering triglycerides.

Since my tri's were OK maybe he just did not feel the additional medication and cost were necessary. I was just wondering if anyone else had explored this option and what their result was.
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I'd rather catch them than eat them,I caught over 100 so far this year,I am trying to break my record of 267.I find that I do like Kipper Snacks.I think they are herring though.I usually eat them as a snack at night, then do the cardio walk and burp the taste up as I am walking<g>.I am going to look into a trout stream so I can actually eat what I am catching with no worries.

Recently...like 3 days ago, I took my test and it said 170 after walking 4 miles around 2 AM. Got up the next day and did a morning test before breakfast and it went up to 194. Looks like I need to walk 2 or 3 times a day to keep it down.

J.P.
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Recently...like 3 days ago, I took my test and it said 170 after walking 4 miles around 2 AM. Got up the next day and did a morning test before breakfast and it went up to 194. Looks like I need to walk 2 or 3 times a day to keep it down.

What had you eaten before/after your tests? While exercise will improve your overall health and work on your weight, it by itself is not a BG reduction tool. Your eating habits have to be taken into account. If you exercise and then drink a gatorade to replenish your body fluids, you are just replacing the carbs you burned. If you exercise just after eating dinner, you will have a delayed reading as your meal is broken down over the next 3 hours. You have to look at the big picture, not just the pieces.
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What had you eaten before/after your tests?

At around 9:30PM I ate a cheese steak.I went on the puter for a while and started walking after 1 AM.I got done the walk around 2:20 AM, showered,took the first test=170, went to sleep, woke up and took another test on an empty stomach=194. I ate nothing in between the test, walked four miles in between test. I am wondering if I didn't burn the entire sandwhich off and somehow I was still digesting it in my sleep even though around five hours passed between the meal and my walk.

J.P.
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While exercise will improve your overall health and work on your weight, it by itself is not a BG reduction tool.

Not sure I agree with this, at least on a daily basis. If I eat a light supper, walk a little, read a little, go to bed, then my blood sugar will be OK in the morning. If I eat a light supper then do a couple of hours of fairly heavy labor, then go to bed, I will wake up trembling and confused at 3 or 4 am with a bs reading of 40-50. I've learned that, at least for me, I must have a snack of 200 or so calories before I go to bed if I've done heavy yard work.

Ted (perhaps I've misunderstood the focus of the conversation)
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I will wake up trembling and confused at 3 or 4 am with a bs reading of 40-50. I've learned that, at least for me, I must have a snack of 200 or so calories before I go to bed if I've done heavy yard work.

My problem is high glucouse.I wish it would drop 40 or 50 points and stay there.Lately 170 has been the lowest.The instruction book that came with my meter says between 70 and 130 is a good ball park figure.Mine sometimes it more than twice the high end of that number depending on a lot of things.

J.P.

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>>If I eat a light supper then do a couple of hours of fairly heavy labor, then go to bed, I will wake up trembling and confused at 3 or 4 am with a bs reading of 40-50<<

We may be confusing a couple of issues here.
(Almost) all the time diabetics truly go low like that, is NOT due to some combo of food + exercise; but due to what we're taking (e.g, pills, insulin, pills + insulin, etc.). Those are the things..and mismatching them with the food and exercise, that send us low. You're not saying you reach 40 in the middle of the night without meds (or, are you?). i.e, you don't control via 'just' diet and exercise, and hit 40??

JP
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>>My problem is high glucouse.I wish it would drop 40 or 50 points and stay there.Lately 170 has been the lowest.The instruction book that came with my meter says between 70 and 130 is a good ball park figure.Mine sometimes it more than twice the high end of that number depending on a lot of things.<<

J.P., I'm a little worried about you; we need to nudge you into better control; but we need more info.
If you don't mind...:
-- age,gender
-- weight
-- meter type, and where you take blood from (e.g., fingertips, forearm, stomach, etc.)
-- meds (e.g., if oral pills: which one; and/or insulin?)

JP
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You're not saying you reach 40 in the middle of the night without meds (or, are you?). i.e, you don't control via 'just' diet and exercise, and hit 40??

No, I take my glipizide (5mg) just before supper. Glipizide before supper, light evening, bed, all is OK. Glipizide before very same supper, heavy exercise, bed, then hit 40 - 50 about 5 or 6 hours after exercise (or at least that's when I wake up.) Since the glipizide was so far removed in time from the low, I hadn't considered it. Thanks for the tip. I wonder if that means that I should take less/no glipizide before supper on nights when I plan yard work?
Ted
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>>I wonder if that means that I should take less/no glipizide before supper on nights when I plan yard work?<<

Ted--

Without trying to be cute....you need to 'play' with it (i.e, experiment on yourself WITH INCREASED MONITORING for the 'experiment') and find out how you react in each situation. By that I mean: you not only need to find out if that exact sequence 'works' as you think it might; but also, what happens if you Don't get the 'as planned' yardwork in after you've eaten a 'normal'
supper for you.
That's the one 'good' thing about being diabetic (actually, there can be a
couple of good things, if it's handled right): we don't have to 'guess' at what such-and-such sequence of events might due to us; we can actually try each sequence, and then do a test, and get a real answer that we can then use from then on.

If Glipizide is 'all' you're on, too, remember..you (almost) certainly are a candidate who can..if he really wanted to.... get it all done with diet and exercise alone. (Which is healthier, too, by the way; all oral diabetic meds..and injected insulin too, for that matter...have side effects). I didn't think I could...but I've been diet-and-exercise only now for 13 months (after Amaryl/glimepiride pills for 5 years), and my percentages continue to be better than ever were on the pills. (On the pills, I probably averaged 5.7% over five years; off of them, I've been between 4.5% and 5.3%). I've lost 103 pounds (so far), and am healthier than I was six or more years ago, also. (Of course, without the pills, the losing weight and maintaining control go hand in hand! Didn't really have a choice).

JP
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Fuskie, stop and think. Your doctor is paid by his practice or hospital. And who pays their bills? The pharmaceutical giants. So of course it's SOP for them to push prescription medication over naturopathic remedies every day of the week. Any time you want an honest opinion, follow the money. Your doctor has a vested interest that opposes vitamins and minerals and herbs and supplements. He is the wrong person to ask.

What you are probably referring to is Omega 6 or Omega 3 oils (I forget which). And yes, one is beneficial, and the other not. I'll try to find the particulars but go ahead and do some research online. You can obtain them easily in liquid or capsule form at a Natural Foods grocer in your area and they are easy to include with your meals. Easiest is simply adding a spoonful to your salad dressing. You may experience some stomach cramps at first.
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Omega 6 or Omega 3 oils (I forget which).

Omega-3 polyunsaturated oil.


follow the money ... You can obtain them easily in liquid or capsule form at a Natural Foods grocer in your area

Talk about following the money!! Flaxseed oil is expensive and is best kept in the freezer [triply-unsaturated omega-3 oils are extremely vulnerable to oxidation AKA going rancid].


My solution: an ounce (1/8 cup, or a coffee measure) of flax seeds in my carbohydrate-bomb oat-bran breakfast [1/8 cup oats, 1/3 cup TVP, 1/4 cup sunflower seeds, 1/8 cup flax seeds, 1/3 cup oat bran, 1 heaping teaspoon (5 g.) spirulina($$), 1 tsp molasses, and enough aspartame to stone a horse]. With luck, this breakfast can be eaten in two shifts, thus delaying the onset of first lunch for an additional 2-4 hours.

The thing that shocks me: the high carb content of oat bran. i was under the delusion that the stuff is mostly fiber; it's not. But it keep things moving more peacefully than wheat bran, it's more flavourful, and it likely reduces cholesterol.


cassandra

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Fuskie, stop and think. Your doctor is paid by his practice or hospital. And who pays their bills? The pharmaceutical giants.

Where is the font of knowledge that this tripe poured from?

So of course it's SOP for them to push prescription medication over naturopathic remedies every day of the week.

Bring your studies to your doctor proving the effectiveness of whatever remedy you have in mind next time you go.

Any time you want an honest opinion, follow the money. Your doctor has a vested interest that opposes vitamins and minerals and herbs and supplements. He is the wrong person to ask.

Total bovine dung.

ab

P.S. The Omega-3's can lower triglycerides - a particular problem for diabetics.
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Fuskie, stop and think. Your doctor is paid by his practice or hospital. And who pays their bills? The pharmaceutical giants. So of course it's SOP for them to push prescription medication over naturopathic remedies every day of the week.

There is a lot of research, testing, and verification that goes into prescription medication. How much goes into naturopathic remedies? What I can find seems not to be very rigorous and not very repeatable, done without adequate controls, and not done using "double blind techniques"

And it's certainly true that the people selling naturopathic remedies are also in it for the profit. I'm afraid I can't agree with what you have said.
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