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Ten years ago, an analyst told a group of engineers that speech recognition "will always be about ten years in the future" (on a continuing basis). So far his prediction looks clairvoyant, and makes me hesitant to invest in this continually emerging area. Stvfox
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I've had a hard time convincing my investment club members to consider this investment area--specifically Lernout & Hauspie (LHSP)

Fred Barbash wrote an interesting article today entitled "Speech Recognition: Hear;Hear!" for The Washington Post's Business Section. In part it discusses LHSP and the part it plays in medical interpretation turnaround time. Specifically, X-ray readings provided in 3 vs 48 hours. One line in the article that touches on your concerns directly is "Speech and voice recognition, in the works for 30 years, appears finally to be moving seriously from lab to life."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A58538-2000Jun3.html
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Your impression is what makes LHSP a good investment. The irony of investing is that you make the best return when you lead the pack. Of course, that involves taking some risk. But, the prevailing view that Speech Recognition is 10 year in the future is keeping the price depressed. One day, the investment community will wake up and recognize that something has, indeed changed. I guess that's a tornado. Then the price will move quickly. During the panic buying is a good time to take some profits.
Don
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Now the radiologists use a new speech-recognition system developed by Lernout & Hauspie. Literally as they speak, their words magically appear in text on a screen. When they're finished, they check for accuracy, which Ravin says is high. They print the report, sign it while both doctors are still present and dispatch it on its way.

Turnaround time: three hours.



Of course, the greater problem is getting the radiologist off the phone with his broker and on to reading the films!



rex ;)
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I take exception to your comment .Most of the physicians I know are hard working and dedicated- Ithink the steriotype of Dr. aways playing golf and talking to their broker does injustice to how hard they work.
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The greatest benefits will go to the disabled. Blind will be read to with "text to speech". Those who can't use a keyboard will be able to speak to their computer. Someday, the Deaf and hard-of-hearing will use SR to see the conversation around them. Some day ---.
Don
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<< I take exception to your comment .Most of the physicians I know are hard working and dedicated- Ithink the steriotype of Dr. aways playing golf and talking to their broker does injustice to how hard they work. >>


Take it easy, take it easy.;)


You should have taken a look at my profile. I've been working closely with radiologists for years, and I can't tell you how many times I've tried to pry that phone away from their ear to look at films. My wife is the radiology administrator for a university medical center, and her problems vis-a-vis turnaround time stem directly from the radiologists' tardiness in dictating reports.

This is not to say that personal investing is always, or even usually the culprit, and my original comment was made tongue-in-cheek, but, really, a lot of radiologists are slow in dictating exams.


rex
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