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When I left the house to deliver bro's weekend dinner, this piece had just started. After a few bars I was 100% certain I'd played it, then 99% certain it was Russian, and 98% certain it was Prokofiev(!), but I had a few candidate pieces in mind, and sadly, guessed wrong. IIRC I played it when I was 15, but still ;-) It was near the end of the piece when we pulled into the garage. I rushed inside to tune in SC public radio on my computer, but it doesn't display the name of the piece--nor does the schedule, which lists programs, but not pieces. Luckily I made it in time to hear the name announced :-)

It's spirited, adorable, fun as all get-out to play, hard for a student orchestra--and short! I think it might appeal to non-classical music aficionados.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-7VG3Xm_7w

PS--Why can I never remember that aficionados has only one f?
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By the way, growing up in coal mining country with a really poor education system and a family whose only knowledge of music is what was sung in church, I am always reluctant to express my musical ignorance on these boards. I never got any exposure to classical music or art until I was an adult and started traveling the world and being an invited guest at concerts and museum events.

So I don't understand art and music in the same way I understand quantum mechanics or partial differential equations. I lack any knowledge or vocabulary of classical music or of music fundamentals. But despite my lack of formal music education, I know what I like and Prokofiev is one of my favorite classical composers. Thanks for this. It is something I had not heard before. I've come back to listen to it twice since you posted.
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Cool! That's why I post music.

I had a parallel situation--I never heard country music growing up in the NYC burbs, the child of parents who were born and bred in Brooklyn and listened only to classical music (once Daddy died, Mom more or less reverted to Easy Listening on DirecTV...when she wasn't watching decreasing CNN and increasing Lifetime/Hallmark movies ;-)

The first, and one of the only, country songs I liked was Dolly Parton's Jolene. And I like some banjo music and fiddling, and some of the country music of the British Isles & Cape Breton. But generally, nothing will get me changing the radio station fast than country music--not even rap/hip-hop, which I can admire as clever while I generally dislike hearing it. Ditto for most "top 40" pop.

TRUE CONFESSIONS
I heard of Queen, of course, but only learned who they were and heard their songs in the past few years.
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Nessie, if you like Prokofiev, you'd probably also like other music of the late 19th and early 20th century--which just happens to be my fave era of classical music. You might also like other Russian composers--I hear Tchaikovsky winking t me from Prokofiev's first suymphony.

Where to start:

Stravinsky--The Firebird, Rite of Spring, Petruchka
Ravel--Pavane pour une enfant defunct, Bolero, Le Tombeau de Couperin
Debussy--Prélude à l’Aprés-Midi d’un Faune, Syrinx, La Mer
Borodin--In the Steppes of Central Asia, String Quartet #2
Dukas--The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Fanfare from La Peri
Moussorgsky / Rimsky-Korsakov--Night on Bald Mountain
Elgar--Enigma Variations

hmmm...all French and Russian plus one Englishman...
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I mostly agree with Alstromeria's suggestions.
Except, I still can't truly appreciate Debussy for some inexplicable reason and I'm unfamiliar with Dukas.

Though my parents were classical music lovers and musicians, and I even played violin for several years growing up, I did not immediately take to classical music and preferred the 70's rock of my teen years. Little by little, I expanded my tastes through progressive rock, Jazz fusion, etc...

Probably due to recordings of Stravinsky on some live Yes albums, and some interpretations of Moussorgsky and Janacek on some Emerson, Lake and Palmer albums, I started there.

Just a couple of additional suggestions, sticking to Russian and Eastern European theme:

Janacek - Glagolith Mass and Sinfonietta
Rachmaninoff - Vespers
Dvorak - most anything, but perhaps his late symphonies (8,9) are a good place to start.
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TRUE CONFESSIONS
I heard of Queen, of course, but only learned who they were and heard their songs in the past few years.


My brother was 9 years older than me. So while I was very young I was exposed to Jefferson Airplane, The Doors, etc. When I was in high school, stuff like Queen and ELO were popular. But I was in search of the music I remembered from when I was younger. I would hear it somewhere, try to identify it, and then I knew a record store that had "cut-outs" (i.e. for some reason they would clip the corners of album covers of out-of-print albums). So I didn't get exposed much to ELO, or Blue Oyster Cult, or similar. I was finding Doors, Jefferson Airplane, Lemon Pipers, Cream, and such.

Except...in the darkroom. I was a candids photographer for the yearbook. I would spend a lot of time in the darkroom, and would keep the radio on so I knew what time it was (they used to announce that a few times an hour) so I wouldn't get locked in the school. So now, listening to the "oldies" station, I'm hearing stuff from the high school darkroom. Turns out I actually like some of ELO, Queen, BTO, and some other stuff.

Was never exposed to classical. Dad liked calypso and big bands. ("daylight come and me wanna go home...") I've never felt the need to seek out any of that.
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Tchaikovsky was the first classical composer I really liked. Back when most of what I listened to was head banger rock and roll (I initially rejected all country music) I also had a collection of Tchaikovsky. The album shops in Urbana used to laugh at my album selections when I would arrive at the counter with one copy of Led Zepplin, the song remains the same and one copy of Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet.

I discovered Mussorgsky because of the Emerson, Lake and Palmer Pictures at an Exhibition album. Once I got a recording of the symphony version, I don't think I ever listened to the ELP version again. Risky-Korsakov's Scheherazade has to be one of my favorite pieces of all time. I still get goose bumps and emotional whenever I hear the end of that. If I could make a violin sound like that, I don't think I would ever do anything again but play. I have also heard Stravinsky and Ravel compositions that I liked a lot, although I can't think of anything specific other than Bolero.

But this probably exhausts my classical music knowledge and probably reveals me to be an ignorant heathen of classical music. Thanks again for the link and for the tips. I don't spend much time seriously listening to any music anymore. There was a time when I would devote time every day to listening. I still own over 500 albums from that period in my life. But I just don't do that anymore. I hear what I hear on the radio while I drive. Several years ago NessieSpouse and I started dancing and going out several times per week to hear live music and dance. Because we live in Phoenix, that meant country music. There were a few rock bars, but they included live music only on weekends while we could find a selection of country western live shows every night of the week. So now I am equally likely to have my car radio tuned to a country, rock or classical channel. I still don't get rap. I like some jazz, but do not get absorbed in a lot of it.
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I forgot about Yes. I had a room mate who loved Yes so I heard a lot of Yes and that did lead me to some appreciation for classical music. And I have definitely heard Rachmaninoff pieces I liked a lot. Thanks for the recommendations.
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Emerson Lake & Palmer!!! <swoon> The band for classical music aficionados who don't like bands ;-)

I was at a San Francisco Symphony concert ~25 years ago when they played a Janacek Symphony. When what to my wondering ears should appear, but the quoted music from an ELP album, and the bliss was sheer ;-) I was about bouncing out of my seat with joy!

I have heard of Yes and Blue Oyster Cult, but no clue (nationality? genre? hits?). My husband liked the Moody Blues, but all I can remember about them is Nights in White Satin...or Knights in White Satin, which is what I thought at the time ;-)

My college boyfriend was into certain things (Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Buffalo Springfield, Crosby Stills Nash, Neil Young, Simon & Garfunkle...), which is what I listened to in college--besides Medieval/Renaissance music and classical. And the songs I heard at mixers (mixers! I haven't heard that word in decades, not to apply to dance parties anyhow).

Another guy I dated in college introduced me to Leonard Cohen, Judy Collins, and Joni Mitchell.
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How could I forget The Planets by Gustav Holst (another Brit)! I listen to that regularly. George Lucas told John Williams to use it as his inspiration for the Star Wars score.
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My husband liked the Moody Blues, but all I can remember about them is Nights in White Satin...or Knights in White Satin, which is what I thought at the time ;-)

My mom still can't listen to that. It was played at my brother's funeral. That, and "The End" by the Doors. Those were two of his favorite bands.

The Moody's had a lot of cool stuff. They did one album with the London Festival Orchestra (which included Nights in White Satin and Tuesday Afternoon). But several of their older albums are good. If you listen carefully, there will be little bits of dialogue like "somebody set off an H-bomb today, but it wasn't anybody I knew". :-)

CSN (sometimes CSN&Y) had some nice stuff. Though some wouldn't translate today (e.g. Ohio...unless you know about Kent State, you won't get it).

I'm mostly 60s and 70s rock. A little 80s (not much).

I don't generally like classical music, but there are exceptions. Not that I race to switch the station, but a lot of it doesn't do anything for me. There are some exceptions, though. The Moonlight Sonata is kinda eerie, but relaxing, for example. I like that one.
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alstro: Elgar--Enigma Variations


Good list, Alstro, except this one may be a bit much for the uninitiated. an hour of sometimes tedious listening.

CNC
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If someone thinks Elgar's Enigma Variations is tedious, they should try his Pomp and Circumstance (yikes--I had to play that for every HS graduation from 7th-11th grade. Fortunately in 12th I was (sweltering) on stage ;-) The very thought makes me want to slap someone!

Been listening to Ravel and Debussy. Gonna clear my head with Night on Bald Mountain ;-)

If I move on to rotten-roll, it'll probably be Dire Straits or Gerry Rafferty.
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Does "hubster" respond to the Moody's? Maybe try that to make him settle-in somewhere to listen?
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No. He doesn't even respond to music he studied and conducted any more or "our song" (a Ravel piece-)--or his own name or simple commands (sit) for that matter. He seems less intelligent than a trained dog now. I had to shave him this morning (first time). Not good at it.
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...or "our song" (a Ravel piece-)...

Did you get caught up in that Bolero phenomenon back in the 80s? Seemed like everyone thought the best music to have sex was the Bolero. ;-)

Then, of course, there was the Fast Times assertion that the best was Kashmir (Led Zeppelin). I think both fads faded, though.

Is Barry White still considered good seduction music?? That was a thing for a while, from what I gather.
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Did you get caught up in that Bolero phenomenon back in the 80s? Seemed like everyone thought the best music to have sex was the Bolero. ;-)

Nope, but I remember it.

"Our song" is Le Tombeau de Couperin. Used it at our wedding.

ASIDE
After an interesting morning (posted on Taking Care of Parents), he's snoozing. Luckily I've moved my allergy shots to afternoon, so I won't need to wake him for an hour, and he'll probably wake himself by then. Lunch of leftover chili over salad with guacamole. One of our faves.
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