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I like Split Pea soup.

I've purchased frozen (this: http://tabatchnick.com/tbtproducts/split-pea-soup-gluten-fre...)
and "tube" soup mix like this: https://amzn.to/2GVDeq7

Both of those options are vegetarian, but I've noticed many online recipes call for a ham hock.

The idea of pea soup with meat sounds appealing, but I don't eat pork.

If I want to use beef instead, what kind of beef would be a good substitute?

Perhaps some kind of deli meat?
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Ham just adds flavor. Since you don't eat pork, what about a smoked turkey leg or some other smoked poultry?

-Donna
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Thanks, Donna. I'll try a smoked turkey leg. That sounds yummy.
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The ham hock includes the bone.. bone marrow which is a bunch of proteins and fats. As the proteins and fats cook, they transform, producing the Umami flavors.

Google Umami. It's the taste sensation called "savory" or "deliciousness".

Mushrooms, bone broth, roasted vegetables, tofu, etc increase Umami.
Using chicken stock/broth is my go to, for soup base, since it increases the Umami.
I also will use "bone broth" powder.

Whenever I make some dish that produces vegetable trimmings, bones/carcass, etc, I will often put these "discards" into a pot and just simmer for a while. This produces an Umami broth for my next soup, beans, etc.

🙂
ralph
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The idea of pea soup with meat sounds appealing, but I don't eat pork.

If I want to use beef instead, what kind of beef would be a good substitute?


Probably the best cut of beast, IMHO, would be ox tail. The second or third best would be beef neck bones and/or shin. My usual procedure for using these cuts of beef is to roast them in a hot (450 degree oven) to brown them. This adds richness to the resulting stock. I’ll add water to the bones and simmer it on a low setting for 7 to 10 hours (usually I’ll just let it simmer overnight). The next day, I’ll strain the stock through a coarse strainer and then restrain it through a fine strainer. The meat and bones would go to the dogs if we had one. The strained stock is then refrigerated overnight and, the next day, the hardened fat is removed from the stock, which had jelled. The stock can then be reheated (in the microwave) and either used in a recipe or frozen for later use.

I also do this with chicken bones & skin, lamb bones, pig bones, etc., etc.
;-)

C.J.V. – I don’t throw out a bone until its simmered for stock, no
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Corned beef is closer in flavor to ham than any other meat I'm familiar with. I might try a beef marrow bone (eg, shin slice) plus corned beef.
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Corned beef is closer in flavor to ham than any other meat I'm familiar with. I might try a beef marrow bone (eg, shin slice) plus corned beef.

Corned beast does have a similar flavor to ham, yes. Another idea would be pastrami, which is corned beef, covered with spices (mostly black pepper & coriander) and smoke cooked. Back in the 70s, my parents would go to the deli counter of their local supermarkets in New Jersey and buy “Doggie Bags”, the end pieces of cold cuts that were too thin or misshapen to be easily sliced for sandwiches. Back then they would get a 4 or 3-pound bag of mixed ham, corned beef, pastrami, etc. for less than a dollar. If you have a kosher deli near by, you might ask about buying a pastrami end hunk cheap.
;-)

Curing one’s own corned beef is a fairly simple process using Morton’s “Tender Quick”. I made some very good corned beef using I-round. I have, however, never made a good pastrami. For some reason, my spices tend to fall off in my smoker(s) and the meat tends to come out dryer and a bit saltier than I like.
;-(

Being in my mid-70s, I try to limit my intake of fat, especially beef, lamb & pig fat, which is why I make & freeze my stocks the way I do.

C.J.V. - time to check the big freezer for any raw corned beast for Saint Paddy’s Day, me
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Corned beef is closer in flavor to ham than any other meat I'm familiar with.

That sounds good, too.

I was discussing these options with one of my daughters, and she reminded me that I once made pea soup and put in diced salami, which I sautéed before adding to the soup.
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That sounds good, too.

I was discussing these options with one of my daughters, and she reminded me that I once made pea soup and put in diced salami, which I sautéed before adding to the soup.


You've had great suggestions. Let us know what you decide to use and how it turns out when you make it! I would think any treated meat would impart flavor...another couple suggestions...dried chipped beef or turkey bacon.

-Donna
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I've never heard of dried chipped beef. (Though my late step-father told me that in his Army days, they were often served "chipped beef on toast," which was colloquially known as "sh*t on a shingle.")

Turkey bacon sounds good, and reminded me that there's such a thing as beef bacon, sometimes called "beef fry" like this: http://mykoshermeat.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/...

I could also use soy sausage or soy bacon, which is no doubt healthier than beef.

Perhaps I'll try all these suggestions, gather reviews from my family, and report back…
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I have, however, never made a good pastrami.

I'm making a venison pastrami right now. We'll see how it tastes.

PSU
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“I have, however, never made a good pastrami.”

I'm making a venison pastrami right now. We'll see how it tastes.


I wish you luck, you’ll probably need it. Of my attempts, my best tasting one was using a “Low Salt” corned beef flat that I bought, trimmed of extra fat, soaked in a couple changes of water before I applied the spices and smoked it. DW thought it was great but I thought it was a bit too tough for my taste. After smoking it for a couple of hours, I should have used the “Texas Crutch” and/or finished it in the oven.
;-)

We have a Salvage Store in the village that also sells butchered meat. I like to check it out on Monday mornings when it opens at 8:30. I was in there yesterday looking for whipped cream and saw two I-round roasts that were marked down for quick sale. I picked up the larger of the two, weighing 4.08 pounds with a sell by date of 3/3/19 for $7.00 (the other one was $6.00). I figured that it would make a good corned beast for St. Paddy’s Day (axe-u-lee I’ll probably cook it on the 18th since I don’t cook on Sundays, no). I trimmed off the fat & silverskin and wound up with 3.64 pounds of meat. I made up a dry cure mixture using Morton’s “Tender Quick” some brown sugar and spices. The original recipe say to use brisket and allow about 5 days per inch of meat. I figure that it should be well cured by the 17th.
;-)

C.J.V. - I know that the only folks that eat corned beef & cabbage in Ireland be the tourists, me
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I wish you luck, you’ll probably need it. Of my attempts, my best tasting one was using a “Low Salt” corned beef flat that I bought, trimmed of extra fat, soaked in a couple changes of water before I applied the spices and smoked it. DW thought it was great but I thought it was a bit too tough for my taste. After smoking it for a couple of hours, I should have used the “Texas Crutch” and/or finished it in the oven.

In case you're interested, this is the recipe I'm using.
https://honest-food.net/venison-pastrami-recipe/
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In case you're interested, this is the recipe I'm using.
https://honest-food.net/venison-pastrami-recipe/


Interesting. In Rytek Kutas’ book “Great Sausage Recipes And Meat Curing”, his recipe calls for a wet cure (pumping) the meat (beef brisket) than a light smoke for 2 hours and increasing the smokehouse temperature to the 200 – 220 degree F range until the meat’s internal temperature reaches 175 – 180 degrees F. I don’t think an internal temperature of 145 degrees F would be hot enough properly cook & tenderize the meat, me. When you do it, please post the results here.

Back in my sausage and jerky making daze 30 or 25 years ago, I tried corning beef using Rytek’s wet cure and Instacure No 1. The cooked beef came out grey instead of a rosy red. I think using Instacure No 2 or a mixture of 1 & 2 would cure that minor problem (still gots boat 2 and 1 in the cabinet along with saltpeter but Tender Quick be easier to use IMHO). Weighing out 3 or 2 grams of the curing salts is also a pain.
;-)

C.J.V. - ain’t got enough teeth to chew jerky or “squaw candy” no more, me
;-(
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Weighing out 3 or 2 grams of the curing salts is also a pain.

I don't think precision is needed. 3 grams of salt is approximately equal to 1/2 tsp.

PSU
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After smoking it for a couple of hours, I should have used the “Texas Crutch” and/or finished it in the oven.

Yes. After smoking, wrap in foil, put in 275 to 300F oven, insert Polder thermometer probe, heat to 195-200F, remove and cool at room temp (DO NOT UNWRAP), cool in fridge overnight before unwrapping, then slice thinly across the grain while cold.

OleDoc
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