No. of Recommendations: 14
Stanford has a free online class, supposedly taught at a graduate level, titled FINANCE OF RETIREMENT & PENSIONS:
http://online.stanford.edu/course/rauh-finance

It is described thusly:
In this eight-week course, you will learn the financial concepts behind sound retirement plan investment and pension fund management. Course participants will become more informed decision makers about their own portfolios, and be equipped to evaluate economic policy discussions that surround public pensions. The course begins with the principles of financial economics, such as the distribution of outcomes when investing in stocks, bonds, or annuities. These serve as the building blocks for an understanding of different retirement strategies that can help you improve your asset allocation. Finally, the course applies these principles to government programs and policies.

The Finance of Retirement and Pensions will culminate in an interactive symposium about the challenges of U.S. pension systems.

Held in January 2014 at Stanford Graduate School of Business, the event will feature representatives of the MOOC teams with the five most promising ideas for pension reform, who will present their proposals to a distinguished panel of faculty and experts in finance and public policy.

Expenses will be covered by Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Hoover Institution.


It's free, tt starts in a couple of days, and the content looks most excellent. Also note the possibility of free travel to Stanford in January if you've got good ideas and the ability to present them.

-IGU-
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I just got word about this class from a colleague, and was coming here to post about it, but you have beat me to it. It most definitely looks interesting, and I have already signed up for it to see what else I can learn about retirement planning. I'd like to be able to add to my knowledge, and if I need to do some tweaking so that we can retire in a couple of years, I can do that as well.

If nothing else, I think it will be informative.

DH just signed up for yet another class, and so this will be something for me to do as well. As I think about it, I got my MBA because I was bored and DH was doing so much work travel back when we were first married, so we're sort of repeating the pattern here. He's gone for something work-related, and I take a class.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
A couple of decades ago I took a course at the Stanford Business School taught by a noted local money manager. I ignored his advice and it cost me several hundred thousand. I think I'm a bit wiser now and less full of myself. I signed up for the course.

db
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No. of Recommendations: 3
dbphd writes,

A couple of decades ago I took a course at the Stanford Business School taught by a noted local money manager. I ignored his advice and it cost me several hundred thousand.

</snip>


What specific piece of advice did you ignore? (I'm assuming it wasn't anything like Dave Ramsey's advice that you should find an advisor who will charge you a big front-end load.)

intercst
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dbphd writes:
I ignored his advice and it cost me several hundred thousand.

That is far, far better than taking his advice and having it cost you that much.

-IGU-
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I consulted with the finacial manager privately as well as attending his classes. He advised that I leave my retirement funds at TIAA-CREF and not move them, most of which were in a fund that emulated the S&P 500. Instead, I foolishly created several hundred thousand in tax liability, and learned how merciless an IRS collector can be.

db
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No. of Recommendations: 3
dbphd posts,

I consulted with the finacial manager privately as well as attending his classes. He advised that I leave my retirement funds at TIAA-CREF and not move them, most of which were in a fund that emulated the S&P 500. Instead, I foolishly created several hundred thousand in tax liability, and learned how merciless an IRS collector can be.

</snip>


A lot of people at Exxon (and their advisors) have seemingly never heard of the "Company stock rule" that allows you to sell the company stock in your 401k plan and pay capital gains rates on the appreciation. Roll your 401k into an IRA on retirement, and you pay ordinary income taxes on the whole thing.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/advisor/2012/01/30/one-thing-you...

The lost tax break is a big number on a 7-figure account.

intercst
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