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I own some good web addresses which I plan to sell if it makes a satisfactory amount. My wife might also get into part time job or somethig. etc.etc.
Otherwise, currently I don't have any business or anything going on.
Would it make sense if I start a company, no business transactions, transfer the web addresses to the company, part time job via the company?
Does the federal and state (Texas) accept such a bussiness where there is not much transaction going on, investment going on, but just occassional money making?
What kind of company (corporation etc) is suitable for doing this, with limited or no liability?
This idea is just budding, any input would be appreciated.
Thanks for your time.
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Would it make sense if I start a company, no business transactions, transfer the web addresses to the company, part time job via the company?

I don't quite understand. What is the point of starting a company that doesn't do anything?
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Sorry I didn't quite explain it.
At present I want to start this company with just the idea of selling some web names, and part time job through this company, and later do more of web names selling and any other ramp up on business transactions. The ramp up might take a few years, but I would like to start a company now so that I could take advantage of tax benefits, and do any kind of immediate intermittent selling only through this company.
So I wonder whether it is a good idea to start a company just for a few transactions at present and slowly ramp up in a few years.
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At present I want to start this company with just the idea of selling some web names....

What web names? If you have gone in and paid for a web name that is trade marked you may not "own" that site/name at all. What names are you talking about - some name that is yet to be used or something like Burger King.com? Do you know about cybersquatting and bad faith issues concerning domain names? Are you registering multiple sites that are identical or confusingly similar to other marks?

I still don't understand what you trying to sell. Can you explain a bit more and then maybe I can tell you a bit about your future.(Having bought some XOM recently my crystal ball is a bit foggy but I have recent knowledge about cybersquatting and trademark issues)

broadinthemarket
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<<Sorry I didn't quite explain it.
At present I want to start this company with just the idea of selling some web names, and part time job through this company, and later do more of web names selling and any other ramp up on business transactions. The ramp up might take a few years, but I would like to start a company now so that I could take advantage of tax benefits, and do any kind of immediate intermittent selling only through this company.
So I wonder whether it is a good idea to start a company just for a few transactions at present and slowly ramp up in a few years. >>


Personally, I prefer to keep things simple. If you are selling off these names and they didn't cost you anything significant, I'd probably treat this as miscellaneous income rather than the proceeds of a business. You declare the income on your taxes, but can't deduct any expenses involved. On the bright side, you pay no self employment taxes.

While I had a positive experience in building my repair business up over several years, I'd be inclined to start that process when you are ready to make a serious effort, rather than a token effort. Spending your time with a lot of process and paperwork that is really unnecessary is something I'd consider a waste of my time.



Seattle Pioneer
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<<...but I would like to start a company now so that I could take advantage of tax benefits,...>>

This sounds a bit Kiyosaki-like. The world of self-employment isn't full of the tax-benefits that the employed world beleieves it to be.

Seattle's post hits it right on the nail.

Vivienne
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Selling web domain names is a very tough business! Don't count on making thousands. Odds are pretty good you won't be able to sell them at all.

Selling web services such as hosting is better. I know a good company to work with. Let me know if you want the url address.
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I own some good web addresses which I plan to sell if it makes a satisfactory amount. My wife might also get into part time job or somethig. etc.


If you're interested, I'd like to exchange thoughts on good methods for selling domain names. The days of people contacting me asking to buy names seem to be gone - or at least on hold. The marketplaces I thought would be reliable now seem to be suspect.

Do you have any thoughts?


ShelbyBoy
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If you have gone in and paid for a web name that is trade marked you may not "own" that site/name at all. What names are you talking about - some name that is yet to be used or something like Burger King.com? Do you know about cybersquatting and bad faith issues concerning domain names? Are you registering multiple sites that are identical or confusingly similar to other marks?


I don't what names the original poster has registered - but there are a lot of people who have bought names without cybersquatting, exhibiting bad faith, etc.

Over the past 2 years I registered about 100 domain names that were related to my business or to other topics in which I have an interest. I'm not going to have time to develop all of these into websites in the forseeable future so I'm looking around for buyers.

I consider that a legitimate activity. Kinda' like buying 100 widgets thinking I will need them all, then selling the excess when I realize I won't need 100 after all.


ShelbyBoy
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Domain name buying and swapping and selling can be tricky. If you were to go to a search engine and type in a domain name and it didnt find it, this does not mean that no-one ownes that name. In fact many a small business wannabes have been burned by this buy/sell scam.

Doing a domain name search with a reputable company is the best way to keep from being stung. Not to mention they can guide you in the good faith and similar name of an existing business thing.

By the way, just having a domain name doesnt mean you will get to sell it or even use it. For example, how many Steve Martins are there in the world? Obviously only one of them can use "stevemartin.com" but which one? That goes for almost any domain name that may have the legitamate (I repeat - legit) reason to be challenged.

Burgerking.com may also be protected from bkburgers.com or wopper.com. In other words, no one may have registered "wopper.com" but it doesnt mean that if you register it, you get to use it. And if you register it, doesnt mean you get to sell it.

Just some food for thought.

rec
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If you were to go to a search engine and type in a domain name and it didnt find it, this does not mean that no-one ownes that name. In fact many a small business wannabes have been burned by this buy/sell scam.

I don't understand your point. If someone types in a domain name at a search engine(?) and doesn't find it - how does that turn into a buy/sell scam.



Doing a domain name search with a reputable company is the best way to keep from being stung.

Anyone can go to whois and find out if a name is registered. You don't need to use search engines or worry about finding a reputable company. This information is readily available to anyone.



Not to mention they can guide you in the good faith and similar name of an existing business thing.

If you mean companies that register names, I think pretty much all of them make it clear that it is your responsibility.



... only one of them can use "stevemartin.com" but which one? ...
Burgerking.com may also be protected from bkburgers.com or wopper.com. In other words, no one may have registered "wopper.com" but it doesnt mean that if you register it, you ...


Let's give the poster the benefit of the doubt. He/she posted a question about starting a business to sell some domain names he/she already has registered. Why all the assumptions about trademark infringement, etc.?



ShelbyBoy
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I don't understand your point. If someone types in a domain name at a search engine(?) and doesn't find it - how does that turn into a buy/sell scam.

It doesnt allways. However, there are numerous times when you enter a domain name and up pops one of those "buy this name or register this name with JoeSChmoeRegisterYourName.com.

Anyone can go to whois and find out if a name is registered. You don't need to use search engines or worry about finding a reputable company. This information is readily available to anyone.

The courts are disagreeing with you in case after case. As I stated you may not be able to use Whopper.com even if Burger King didnt register it. As with SteveMartin.com even if the comedian hasnt registered it, this does not mean that anybody named Steve Martin can register that name. Look at how many people and companies have been sued over names. I believe I saw a case were somebody registered the name kaymart.com but the company K-mart sued and won. A reputable domain name registration or a lawyer familiar with this area is your best protection.

Let's give the poster the benefit of the doubt. He/she posted a question about starting a business to sell some domain names he/she already has registered. Why all the assumptions about trademark infringement, etc.?

Because as I have stated, just because you registered the name or think you registered it doesnt automaticaly give you the right to use or sell that name. My point stands with SteveMartin.com. In fact there were already of number of celebrity name/domain name cases tried in the courts. All of them so far have been ruled in favor of the celeb. And the celebs didnt register thier name first. I think some of the top names have been Julia Roberts, Kim Bassinger, Bruce Willis, etc. Again, just because you register the name doesnt mean you get to sell or even use the name. CHECK FIRST.

rec










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I don't understand your point. If someone types in a domain name at a search engine(?) and doesn't find it - how does that turn into a buy/sell scam.

It doesnt allways. However, there are numerous times when you enter a domain name and up pops one of those "buy this name or register this name with JoeSChmoeRegisterYourName.com.

How is that a scam? I see it as a legitimate advertisement. Every time I log on to my Yahoo! email account I see an ad encouraging me to register my personal name as a domain name. I don't consider that a scam.



Anyone can go to whois and find out if a name is registered.

The courts are disagreeing with you in case after case.

???????



Let's give the poster the benefit of the doubt. He/she posted a question about starting a business to sell some domain names he/she already has registered. Why all the assumptions about trademark infringement, etc.?

Because as I have stated, just because you registered the name or think you registered it doesnt automaticaly give you the right to use or sell that name. My point stands with SteveMartin.com...

I understand your point and I agree with it. I just don't understand why you are making the point. The original poster didn't indicate anything about selling names related to a person or business. That's why I said give him the benefit of the doubt.


ShelbyBoy









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I understand your point and I agree with it. I just don't understand why you are making the point. The original poster didn't indicate anything about selling names related to a person or business. That's why I said give him the benefit of the doubt.


ShelbyBoy


I know that Shelbybaby, what I am saying is that just because he thinks he has registered a bunch (I think the number was 100) of names doesnt mean he gets to use or sell any of them regaurdless of his original intent. So giving him the benefit of the doubt is not going to protect his legal butt. What I was suggesting is that he have the names checked out or means tested with a reputable (if there is such a thing) domain search firm to make sure he isnt treading on any legal waters.

As in any business, cover your a#%$ as best you can BEFORE you get into trouble.

rec









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Burgerking.com may also be protected from bkburgers.com or wopper.com. In other words, no one may have registered "wopper.com" but it doesnt mean that if you register it, you get to use it. And if you register it, doesnt mean you get to sell it.

The law is still very fuzzy on all this.

If you are trying to ride the coat tails of a company that's usually been accepted as copyright or trademark infringement.

But if the site has nothing to do with the other company then often the courts have sided with the original owner. But it does require going to court and that gets expensive.
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Try doing a domain search at either Network Solutions or Open Source (opensrs.com). If you're dealing with .com, .net or .org those are the two major players with the best databases.

BTW, either way if you do make a public offer to sell a domain name expect to be accused of cybersquatting, unfair practices, thievery, shooting Lincoln (ok, maybe not that :) ), etc.

There is such hysteria over selling a domain name. There's another site with a swap/sell board I occationally post for sale a few domain names I bought. And with in hours I get a flood of email telling me what a horrible person I am.

IMO, selling a good domain name is like buying prime undeveloped real estate and turning around to tying to sell it.

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If you are trying to ride the coat tails of a company that's usually been accepted as copyright or trademark infringement.

But if the site has nothing to do with the other company then often the courts have sided with the original owner. But it does require going to court and that gets expensive.


I must respectfuly disagree. Take a case in the 80's that set the stage for this whole mess. (BTW yes, lower courts are all over the map on this but higher courts and federal courts are more consistant) Sears & Roebuck vs. Sears Oil. Sears Oil was named after the founder of that regional oil company, as was Sears & Roebuck. However the courts found in faver of Sears & Roebuck even though they were in two totaly different industries. Sears Oil had to change its name. Even thou Sears Oil always stated its name as Sears Oil and had disclaimers in its advertising and at its stations noting that it was not affiliated with Sears & Roebuck. The judge claimed the right to the name Sears for use in commercial applications belonged to Sears & Roebuck weahter or not consumer confusion existed or not. The same thing has been applied to domain names. But I do not fall into the hystaria crowd. I am all for buying and selling names. I agree, it is like real estate. However, you cant sell one inch of land that you dont own and have not been given permision to sell.

rec
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Very good point.
I was thinking that I would list all the names in a web site, and provide contact email, and ... well then need to advertise that web site, or send to companies who might be interested in those names.. or something like that!
Some one had written about illegal ways of holding familiar names - this does not even occur to me, of course. I am holding names which I think would be valuable in the future, that is all!
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