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Having lurked on this Board for some time, I am very impressed with the assistance everyone has given here. Suddenly, I find myself in the position of needing help. The state, where I now reside, has informed me that I need to file a state tax return for 1998. As an ex-pat, I didn't think so.

Here is some background: I lived and worked abroad for approximately 10 years. During this period, I kept a bank account in this state to facilitate vacations, purchases, transfer of money to college kids, etc.

The question is: Do I have to submit a state return and pay income tax to the state even though I was not a resident?

I would greatly appreciate any help you might give me.

pec
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Which state is it? They all have different rules.
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Colorado
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I'm afraid Colorado's a state I know nothing about. But I believe it's the home of TheBadger, who's pretty regularly here. Perhaps he'll see this and be able to help.

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Thank you very much. I appreciate your taking the time to respond.
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Hi,

I looked on the Colorado State web site. I am not sure but it looks like that you must file if you had income earned in colorado and you had to file a federal tax form.

Here is a link to the colorado tax forms. Page seventeen seems to be applicable to non residents.

http://www.revenue.state.co.us/PDF/02104.pdf

Good Luck
Pat
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Hi,

I looked on the Colorado State web site. I am not sure but it looks like that you must file if you had income earned in colorado and you had to file a federal tax form.


In most states, bank interest earned is not sourced from any particular location, but is taxable in the state of residency. The fact that it was a CO bank is irrelevant.

Some states define residency by the number of days spend "in-state", others by maintaining a residence regardless of days actually spent "in-state", others by secondary factors such as maintaining a driver's license and voter registration. Each state also has its own rules as to what factors determine the end of residency.The instructions for the 1998 CO Form 104 do not define residency. Depending on the circumstances under which you moved out of the country, where you moved from, your intentions to return, and, most important, how CO state law defines residency will all affect the correct answer.

Being from the east coast, I can't provide any further insight into CO specifics.

Ira
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Hi Pat,
Thank you very much for directing me in the right direction with the link to the Coloado Revenue Department's website. I have spent some time looking into it and I am pretty sure that I found my answer. It was great to get your help!! Thank you very much.

pec

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Hi Pec,

Great...I am glad it helped.

Pat
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Ira,
Thank you so much for your help.
I reviewed the Colorado State web site again and found that bank account interest income is not taxed by non-residents. The specific instruction for form 104PN (part year and non-residents) for line B, which is interest and dividends, states that "Non-residents enter nothing on line B". This is what I was looking for and previously had not seen.

To establish that I was not a resident should not be difficult, even though I spent 1 week as part of my vacation in Colorado.

I really appreciate all the assistance both you and Pat have given me.

pec

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