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... they actually have whole courses on this. If a dentist can credibly diagnose a patient with some of these 15 "problems", it's like putting a new automobile in his driveway. Years ago I had a dentist that kept checking me for TMJ. WTF? That's apparently the most profitable item on the list.

15 Services for Dentists to Bill Medical Insurance
https://niermanpm.com/blog/services-to-bill-to-medical-insur...

15 dental procedures medical insurance may pay:

Exams for services that are covered by medical
Panorex x-rays
CBCT (cone beam) and tomography
Oral infections, cysts, oral inflammation
Sleep apnea appliances (Dental Sleep Medicine)
TMJ appliances and headache treatment
Accidents to teeth
Mucositis and stomatitis (from chemotherapy and other treatments).
Frenectomy/tongue tie for infants and children
Facial pain treatment
Dental Implants and bone grafts (check out how much do dental implants cost here)
3rd molars or wisdom teeth extraction
Biopsies
Clearance exams before chemotherapy or surgery
Botox Injections for bruxism and jaw pain

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intercst
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<<3rd molars or wisdom teeth extraction>>




My dentist recommended these teeth be extracted some forty years ago. He said these teeth weren't necessary and were prone to a lot of problems.

I had them extracted on this recommendation.

He referred me out to an oral surgeon for the procedure. It's not clear to me how this put a new car in his driveway.

I think it's quite true that any dishonest service provider can find ways to screw his clients, which is why shopping around for someone whose advice you trust is a good idea.


<<Years ago I had a dentist that kept checking me for TMJ. WTF? That's apparently the most profitable item on the list.>>


Why did you see this dentist repeatedly if you didn't trust him to treat you competently and honestly?




Seattle Pioneer
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SP confuses,

My dentist recommended these teeth be extracted some forty years ago. He said these teeth weren't necessary and were prone to a lot of problems.

I had them extracted on this recommendation.

He referred me out to an oral surgeon for the procedure. It's not clear to me how this put a new car in his driveway.

</snip>


It has to be stuff the dentist can complete in house for the highest profit margin. If he has to refer the work out, he might only get a referral fee.

Lot's of wisdom teeth are extracted unnecessarily. (I still have 3 of the 4.) I'd be very suspicious of extracting a healthy tooth "because it might be a problem in the future". If the wisdom teeth are impacted (i.e., never rose out of the gum), that's a different story.

intercst
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<<Lot's of wisdom teeth are extracted unnecessarily. (I still have 3 of the 4.) I'd be very suspicious of extracting a healthy tooth "because it might be a problem in the future". If the wisdom teeth are impacted (i.e., never rose out of the gum), that's a different story.

intercst>>



Heh, heh! I didn't realize intercst was a dentist in addition to engineer and financial planner!



<<He referred me out to an oral surgeon for the procedure. It's not clear to me how this put a new car in his driveway.

</snip>

It has to be stuff the dentist can complete in house for the highest profit margin. If he has to refer the work out, he might only get a referral fee.>>


So you really can't consider that the dentist recommended their removal because he thought it was a good thing to do. His motivation had to be a referral fee, assuming that one was paid at all.



I have yet to understand where your cynicism comes from.



Seattle Pioneer
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