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I got back some of the lab results from my Tuesday physical. My 3moBG was down from 6.3 to 5.7 since last February. Still no medication except preventative, and doc does not want to see me for 6mo. Can we dance a happy dance?
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Very cool! And dancing can be good exercise!

Mine was 6.5 in April, but I have been doing serious low carbing since then because my cholesterol numbers were a bit high. I am hoping it will bring both sets of numbers down.

Keep up the good work!

Susan
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Different kinds of carbohydrates have different glycemic indexes. That is to say they vary in the amount that they push your blood sugar up. Worse than that, any given carbohydrate seems to have varying glycemic indexes for different individuals.

As an example, an ounce of white bread will bounce my blood sugar higher than an ounce of candy. This might or might not be true for someone else.
Ted
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When givin a choice, I eat whole grain, then light wheat, then white.
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Mine was 6.5 in April, but I have been doing serious low carbing since then because my cholesterol numbers were a bit high. I am hoping it will bring both sets of numbers down.<?i>

Increased cholesterol/triglycerides go hand in hand with elevated blood sugars and they will come down with tighter control of blood sugars (though not always to goal).

ab
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Increased cholesterol/triglycerides go hand in hand with elevated blood sugars and they will come down with tighter control of blood sugars (though not always to goal).

ab
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Oops. Just to add on, there is a recent study showing the cholesterol-lowering agent (statin), Zocor, can prevent 1st heart attacks in diabetics regardless of their initial cholesterol levels. This will almost certainly prove to be a class-effect, meaning all statins (Lipitor, Pravachol, Lovastatin, etc.) will be beneficial in this regard. This is a pretty big deal, and as a matter of fact, the statins have been proven to be quite a boon in the prevention (both primary and secondary) in the fight against heart disease.

ab

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>>My 3moBG was down from 6.3 to 5.7 since last February. Still no medication except preventative, and doc does not want to see me for 6mo.<<

First...good! Keep it up; meaning, keep going. The good news is that you're coming down. The less-than-perfect news: the rule that says 'below 6% is excellent' is out of date, and they haven't gotten around to revising it yet, like they have other numbers. (e.g. morning, fasting b.g. levels to be declared officially 'diabetic' used to be pretty high; then, 6 years ago, it was still 140; now, 127. Same with blood pressure; the limits on it have been made more strict (and bp is even more important for us than for non-diabetics, remember). Our 'max' goal now has to be down to 120/70.

Every year that goes by, it becomes even clearer that permanent organ damage (for example) occurs unless bg is controlled much tighter than was thought previously. Remember, 'normal' folks are under 5%; 6% = excellent is almost certainly not really excellent in terms of preventing further damage over time; such as against the heart.
(In fact, when I had my latest quarterly with my doc last week; one thing I asked him was, why didn't he test for CRP (C-Reactive Protein), which Men's Health Magazine says ALL men over 40 need to include that in their blood workup. His answer: "Well, if you absolutely insist, we could do it. But all C-Reactive Protein does is give us one more parameter--like cholesterol, etc.-- to take into consideration to determine whether you're at risk of heart disease. But, Jim, you're a diabetic; you already HAVE heart disease, by definition. So it's of no use". To which I responded, "Oh, yeah that's right"...since ADA's monthly magazine has made clear that all diabetics..but especially Type IIs (which is only 90% of us!) have heart damage equivalent to one heart attack already; and all risk factors need to take that into account.

>>... and doc does not want to see me for 6mo.<<

Er, caution, there. It takes a lot less time than that for someone who WAS in control, to lose control...and cause damage you can't recover. Unfortunately, I know: I went for 3 years, never rising above 5.9%; to the point where I took it as a given that I could remain in control. Then, in quick succession, had a career catastrophe at work; an accident; and money problems. AND, I ended up missing my quarterly blood work. But, hey, I was in control, no problem. Right?
Well...turns out that stress, BY ITSELF, raises bg in diabetics. i.e, maintain all other parameters, and put yourself under real stress for a decent while, and your numbers will go up. I thought I new that...but.... and of course, in addition, I also lost my discipline on my food and exercise during this time, due to the same stress.

End result....after a few months, my eyes--which I had maintained at 20/20....started going south, and became noticeable when I was clearly much worse at the end of one week than at the beginning! But by then the damage was done; went back into my opthamologist, and sure enough, down to 20/250..and it's permanent. All in a couple of months. From now on, I (MYSELF!) insist on quarterly blood work--which my doctor, who also had said I didn't have to do it for 6 months, agreed to now. So your experience with your doctor is unfortunately standard, I think..but it shouldn't be.

And my doc and I have agreed that as long as the numbers look good, I only have to see him every six months...but blood work every 3, he'll look at the numbers and mail 'em to me; and so long as we're ok, I don't need to come in that quarter.


I just wanted to caution you, is all, ok? Most insurance companies go along with quarterly blood work for diabetics, and since honest damage can happen in that short a period of time, in my view, should be taken advantage of.

JP
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JP is correct. Hemoglobin A1C's need to be done every 3 months as JP's experience suggests.

Target organ damage really starts to take off right above 6%, however, it increases markedly at 7% and thus the recommendation for under 7%. The lower the better as long as you're not getting frequent sugars in the 50's and 60's.

If you don't have a hang-up about taking medicine, and a lot of people do, you might ask your doctors about being started on a statin (Lipitor, Zocor, Pravachol, etc.) for primary prevention of heart disease. Statins also seem to lower the C-reactive protein - CRP - that is strongly correlated with higher risk of heart disease, though the cause and effect mechanism isn't yet known. Talk to your doc about side-effects like elevated liver tranaminases (always checked for because of seriousness but rare), and myopathy or intense muscle aches that indicate muscle break down which can occur with these drugs.

ab - I take Lipitor myself for primary prevention
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ab: and myopathy or intense muscle aches that indicate muscle break down which can occur with these drugs.

Could you say more about intense muscle aches? A muscle in my right leg aches frequently, especialy after an hour or two of driving or sitting, but I would not call it intense. It's been this way for a couple of years. i've taken lipitor for about 6 years.
TIA Ted
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Could you say more about intense muscle aches? A muscle in my right leg aches frequently, especialy after an hour or two of driving or sitting, but I would not call it intense. It's been this way for a couple of years. i've taken lipitor for about 6 years.
TIA Ted
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I doubt this is statin-induced myopathy which generally doesn't occur in a single muscle group. A simple test called creatinine kinase (or creatinine phosphokinase) can diagnose it along with muscle pain typically in the back, hips, and/or legs.

ab
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ab I doubt this is statin-induced myopathy which generally doesn't occur in a single muscle group. A simple test called creatinine kinase (or creatinine phosphokinase) can diagnose it along with muscle pain typically in the back, hips, and/or legs.

Thank you for the reply. My last blood work lists a creatinine of 1.1 mg/dl (just says creatinine without adding the word kinase or phosphokinase) so if that's the same thing, then I guess all is well.
Thanks again,
Ted
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Thank you for the reply. My last blood work lists a creatinine of 1.1 mg/dl (just says creatinine without adding the word kinase or phosphokinase) so if that's the same thing, then I guess all is well.
Thanks again,
Ted
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Actually, the "creatinine" is different in that that particular test (which is a normal value) is used an indication of kidney function. The muscle test must be the of the kinase variety.

ab
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FWIW I think i ask to make sure that the doctor ran the muscle test..

I ask mine 2 months ago and he took me of lipitor.



RayR
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Increased cholesterol/triglycerides go hand in hand with elevated blood sugars and they will come down with tighter control of blood sugars (though not always to goal).

My doctor tells me that I have very good control of my blood sugar already. From what I read, I would prefer it to be lower, but then, I am just a lay person <g>.

Susan
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If you don't have a hang-up about taking medicine, and a lot of people do, you might ask your doctors about being started on a statin (Lipitor, Zocor, Pravachol, etc.) for primary prevention of heart disease. Statins also seem to lower the C-reactive protein - CRP - that is strongly correlated with higher risk of heart disease, though the cause and effect mechanism isn't yet known. Talk to your doc about side-effects like elevated liver tranaminases (always checked for because of seriousness but rare), and myopathy or intense muscle aches that indicate muscle break down which can occur with these drugs.

ab - I take Lipitor myself for primary prevention


The last time I saw my dr. he suggested both a statin and a medication to lower my bp as preventive measures. I did balk at both. The bp meds don't concern me too much, but I am not sure about statins. I also live with FMS, and possibility of more muscle pain is REALLY a concern for me.

Susan
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FMS,

sorry, I don't know that abbreviation. Help?
Ted
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Sorry about that.

FMS => FibroMyalgia Syndrome

Susan
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