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I've been sort of keeping an eye on realtor.com for a bit over two years, but nothing I saw made me want to take a closer look. Until Monday of last week, when I saw a listing that checked all my mental boxes. So much so that I contacted a realtor and saw the place on Tuesday. Put my offer in on Thursday for the full asking price, and on Friday raised my offer a good bit and had it accepted. That I actually went ahead and looked is surprising enough, buying it without my wife beside me to push it along is far harder to believe.

Around here at least, in my part of Connecticut, nothing seems to last more than a week before showing Contingent in the listings. I had to pay well above asking to get this one. On the other hand, 2.75 (20% down, 30 year) is kind of nice. (When I bought my first house in 1982 it was 20% down, 16% variable, no cap. And you thought things were strange these days!)

Today was the inspection. It passed with flying colors, nothing substantial at all. The guy who is moving out showed me around for a few minutes before the inspection started. He'd expected to live there the rest of his life, and the care he had put into the house reflected that. But his employer relocated him.

I own my current place free and clear, and will be selling it eventually, but probably after a while. Too much stuff to dispose of rather than move. Too may things to get fixed, though I already have we-buy-for-cash feelers coming my way. It is a seller's market, as I proved when I had to raise my offer above asking.

The down payment is coming out of my IRA, with a pretty tough tax hit. The money I clear when I sell will make more IRA withdrawals optional for a while. I figure doing a ROTH conversion from my IRA next year without any withholding, making estimated tax payments from the house proceeds. And I may well buy the Tesla Y this has pushed into next year.

Closing is the next hurdle, but things seem to be moving right along for that. Moving, now that is going to be painful.
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Congrats!

I'm on the same path as you in this crazy CT market. Looking to buy first, then sell.

So happy that you found something that checked all the boxes. I'm sure your current home will sell quickly when you put it on the market.

Best of luck!
nag
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Just wanted to tell you...the path to getting rid of things is hard.

I just pulled an old kerosene lantern. On Ebay...maybe...maybe selling for 20.00. Maybe.

I'm just going to continue donating and then probably a tool sale and then dumpster.

I wish you the best.

Me, personally, I would like the floors refinished before putting house on the market.
But that would require getting furniture moved, or if timing is good, replaced.
It just still requires a furniture free floor and you out of the house.

nag
it's just not that easy to buy something now.
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Thanks for your feedback, nag. I don't think I am underestimating the challenge, so much as having a tough time encompassing it all! 8-(

Getting rid of stuff will be mostly via dumpster. Stuff too good to trash may be offered free on a local neighborhood board. Small stuff worth selling might get carried down to my sisters in southern NJ who sell stuff on the side and given to them.

I am far, far, far more likely to do an as-is sale after some specific repairs are done. I know quite well what is expected these days in terms of preparation and staging, and the distance between where it is and where it would have to be is just too great. And I just don't have it in me. In its favor there are things like the neighborhood, square footage (2600 or so based on footprint measurements), four bedrooms, three full baths. The master bedroom "suite" is the star - 26x26 with a full bath and a library that could become a fifth bedroom. But the eat-in kitchen is from 1983, the original main bathroom older still, among other complicating issues.

I will have my realtor giving me the benefit of her decades of experience and hundreds of homes sold. Which I will take with an appropriate dose of salt.

Meanwhile the new place just keeps looking better and better! 8-)
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RHinCT can't imagine The Getting Rid of it All....I'm doing slowly.

Whole house? Oh boy.
You are going to have moments...stay strong.

I'm just so happy for you.
If I can find my spot I'll let you know.

nag
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YEP
In the same boat...

I am far, far, far more likely to do an as-is sale after some specific repairs are done. I know quite well what is expected these days in terms of preparation and staging, and the distance between where it is and where it would have to be is just too great. And I just don't have it in me.


Nothing wrong with that.
We did our time :-)

nag
turn it to another generation
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turn it to another generation

One if the secondary motivations for the move is to avoid my daughter being stuck with the total mess someday.
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FYI.... It took me two years to get ready to sell our (major) *first* downsize 5 years ago. We are smack in the middle of a move now, too, and it’s much less painful this time, one rummage sale and a few trips to the donation site, taking less than a month.

We had to pay over asking for our new place, a townhome condo. Word of mouth from DH’s buddy got us in to look at the property before it was listed on the MLS, and we didn’t want it to get on the market and spark a bidding war. It was exactly what we have been looking for for 2 years.
Our current place sat on the market for a few weeks...we dropped the price a bit, and it sparked a small bidding war. We ended up getting a little over asking. Go figure.

The world of real estate is pretty weird right now.

Isewquilts2
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Glad to hear that downsizing will get easier - I'm at the point where I think things are still multiplying on their own! I get rid of some and more stuff appears.

The world of real estate is pretty weird right now.
Isn't that the truth!

nag
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I just don't have it in me.

I hear you.

DH & I did a major renovation about 6 years ago to the house we'd lived in for decades, not knowing if we'd be there another 3 years or 30. Turns out, we were there another 4 years. Quick sale, as everything was still in great condition. We'd done the major purge before renovating, and did another purge when prepping for sale.

Last year, after my dad moved to Assisted Living, I emptied his house and dumped about $50k (of his money) and 800 hours (of my time) into cleaning, fixing, and prepping it for sale. Just repairs and cosmetic upgrades, no major renovation. Again, quick sale, but the process left me exhausted.

Now we've just completed our 3rd move in 3 years (long story). Furniture in place, boxes all unpacked, shrubs trimmed, gardens mulched. Nothing on the walls yet; all the art is still wrapped up in a storage closet. I've run out of steam.

After several years of living in different houses and looking forward to our custom house where we'll have x, y, and z, I'm now thinking: do I want to work with architects and contractors again? Do I even want to move again, at all?
This rental, despite its quirks, checks most of the boxes, so how about we just stay here awhile? I've gone from compulsively checking zillow to basically not caring what else is out there. Yeah, I'd love to have a walk-in pantry again, but is it worth the hassle to get one? Maybe it's the hot weather, or quarantine ennui, or I've hit a certain age, but I'm feeling burned out.

And in your case, even if you wanted to fix up your house before putting it on the market, chances are contractors are booked solid and it'd be even more trouble than usual to get things done. (Apparently everyone isolating at home is looking around and realizing what upgrades would make it much nicer.)

One option you might consider: is your daughter local? If you take care of emptying the house, would she be interested in spiffying it up for sale? Emptying is hard, spiffying can be fun. If she's interested. If not, are there good stagers in your area? Staging will make a huge difference, especially since your house is in basically good condition, just dated. Your Realtor should be able to recommend good stagers, and their websites should have before & after pictures, to give you an idea of what they might do. Plus, stagers have contractors who give them priority over individual homeowners, so you'll be able to get more done working with a stager than alone.

The concept, of course, is that spiffying and staging will pay for themselves, because buyers of "as is" houses expect such a steep discount. But if you'd rather discount than deal with the hassle (even delegating to a stager can be a bit of a hassle), totally understandable!
I used to see houses in my neighborhood sold as is, and I thought, "If they'd only put $30k into it, they could've gotten $50k more," but now I understand. You reach a point where the $20k difference is just not worth it.

Good luck! Congrats on the new place!
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Thanks!

The new place - bordering on perfect, though people are still living there - makes me realize just how much needs to be done here in the old place.

My daughter and her husband are about a 23 minute drive from the old place. She has a full time job currently from home - in addition to handling the household. He has a full time teaching job plus a business on the side. They are more than willing to help, but there are limits to how much I want to put on them. My other daughter's companion is a contractor/builder, but way up in VT. If we empty this place he might have some slow time in the winter to come down and deal with the things that must get done, maybe even a few of the less urgent items. I would pay, of course.

It will all work out, one way or another.
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You’re on your own! DD unavailable, other DD’s SO not local, and as a contractor he’d want to use his own subs, so will probably pass even if he has time, which he probably won’t.

So, maybe stagers.

The hardest part, finding the next place, is done, yay! So yeah, selling the old place will work out fine. It’s so nice you can move first and then sell, that’ll make selling a lot easier.
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The previous owner is being relocated by his work. He has no financial stake in the house any longer (but a great deal of pride) as the relocation service bought it. He is facing moving over a thousand miles to somewhere he has no home yet. Along with his family.

That's no fun at all.
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I'm feeling burned out.

Oh my. Take some time off to decompress. Besides, good time to be in a rental as there is a good chance we are heading into a down market for real estate. Hit the ground running after you are rested.

IP
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I'm planning to move to another state in roughly 21 months. We have lived in our house for 22 years and raised two boys here. I've already been selling stuff and will keep selling for the next 21 months.

When you have an attic, a basement and two large outbuildings, you have a tendency to fill the spaces.

So far, I've sold books, toys, concrete blocks etc. There's still a fair amount more to go.

Fool on,

mazske
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Many move far more stuff than they should.

If item x is old, you may be better off to pitch it or sell it and buy new for your new home. Washer/dryer, refrigerator, lawn mower, snow blower, TVs, PCs, furniture, etc. I like the clothing rule. If you haven't worn it in three years, pitch it.

Junk is junk. Get rid of it.

It's especially challenging for pack rats.
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So far the paperwork is moving along. Small issues that came up are resolved.

Many move far more stuff than they should.

... Washer/dryer, refrigerator, lawn mower, snow blower, TVs, PCs, furniture, etc. I like the clothing rule. If you haven't worn it in three years, pitch it.


My Maytag "Commercial Duty"* washer and dryer have been totally reliable with no service... since 1983. None in the new place. I am so tempted to take them. 8-)

Lawn mower, snow blower, TV, PCs... all are making the trip. Furniture, some will, but much won't. The old piano won't, nor the convertible sofa. Those are headed for the dumpster, but I figure on having a pre-dumpster free-please-take-it Saturday, with just a bit of publicity. Things I think could be used would get their chance at avoiding the dumpster that one day. I've heard that free stuff might actually "sell", maybe I will find out.

There will be some major donations of clothing to the Salvation Army. The intimidating problem isn't the big stuff, but the small stuff.

Our recycle can is hoisted by muscle, not machine. That means I can only toss a few years of National Geographic at a time. But I have some shooting magazines from the late 60's, early 70's that I think could be worth a few dollars, and I'd rather see them recirculated than recycled.


*(It says so right on the sticker! After all this time I guess I am ready to believe it was true.)
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When I moved, I moved most of the items on the list. But most of them failed in the first year. Would have been better to get rid of them and save the moving cost.

On National Geographic, I was able to sell many old magazines on Ebay. I put them in bundles. Had old history and computer magazines. Many sold.
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If you move your washing machine, make sure mover knows how to support the center shaft.

It probably depends on how far you move. I moved half way across the country and had stuff in storage of a month or so.

Center spindle of my washing machine got bent--probably from rough handling.
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On National Geographic, I was able to sell many old magazines on Ebay.

You also might want to contact schools in your area. Normally, they don't want them but if your area is doing remote learning, they might. I've had requests for books and board games from a neighbor who is the school district psychologist. She touches base with the kids as often as possible and tries to drop things off to them to keep them involved and off the screens. Libraries are not necessarily as available as they once were.

IP
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The TV will be a gold plated SOB to move. It is a 65” about as thick as nothing with no place to grab. But it is less than a year old and cost $2k. My stereo speakers are about 5’ tall 18” wide and 3” deep. For those I saved the boxes but I dread packing them. Other electronics will travel in my car.

The new place is 15 miles/30 minutes away.

I haven’t mentioned my books. In my current house I have a library, as well as five tall bookcases in other rooms. 22 feet of wall space for tall bookcases for hardcovers and trade paperbacks. Even after winnowing they will be about full. And then there are the mass-market paperbacks... 8-)
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I haven’t mentioned my books. In my current house I have a library, as well as five tall bookcases in other rooms. 22 feet of wall space for tall bookcases for hardcovers and trade paperbacks. Even after winnowing they will be about full. And then there are the mass-market paperbacks... 8-)

All good Covid donations right now, if you can bear to part with them. We gave many hundreds of books away, primarily to Good Will who resells them and to the local library we were moving to, (yeah, still had to move them,) as they were light in YA books and had no budget to improve their collection. Rural library. I got permissions from the kids to donate their books. Kept all the little kid climb in my lap and be read to books, but teens will likely be using readers in the future, so didn't keep any of those.

IP
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A load of my wife's popular hard-cover fiction from the last years before she switched to a Kindle will be donated to the library. And I will winnow a bit, more than a bit, but a lot of what I don't want nobody else will want either. I may load up the car and head out to a vast used book store at the other end of the state and see what they will take. I'm ashamed to say I have never been there, though given my tendencies it would have meant even more books to move or dispose of.

I have to figure out if it is trash or recycle for Britannica, my old computer books from my years in IT, my wife's college text books.
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I have to figure out if it is trash or recycle for Britannica, my old computer books from my years in IT, my wife's college text books.

Even in the early 2000's before I quit my programming job, we had found that it was often easier & quicker to use google than to try to find the information in the manual. ClearCase was the version control tool that we used, and the manuals were something like 4-5 large binders. Googling was *much* quicker than looking up something arcane in the manual.

As for Britannica...whatever you have was probably obsolete a month after printing. You'll likely find that it will be treated like when we donated a couple of (working) 24" CRT TV's to Goodwill. "Just set them by the dumpster."
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The TV will be a gold plated SOB to move. It is a 65” about as thick as nothing with no place to grab. But it is less than a year old and cost $2k.

Movers have boxes for TV's up to 65".

Our movers said they had a box for our 75" TV, then said no, it'd have to be crated*, then said oh they have a box after all.
What they did was splice two padded cardboard boxes intended for 65" TV's together. IMO, should've been crated, but no harm done, so I guess it was OK. A 65" TV will definitely be OK.

* crated = custom wood-framed padded boxes. We crated a large oil painting and a coffee table glass top.
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Even in the early 2000's before I quit my programming job, we had found that it was often easier & quicker to use google than to try to find the information in the manual.

Sure, let Google be your index.

When I first got into my final programming niche there was nothing to refer too, it was try it and figure it out. (Google hadn't quite come on the scene yet! I used AltaVista, which seemed like magic.) On CompuServe I found like minded pioneers and we had a pretty good thing going there. Just about any question that got asked we could give solid answers. The people I got to know then wrote most of the books in one row of the shelf above my desk. I bought the books as much out of loyalty to my friends as through need. Everyone except me was writing and consulting, but that just wasn't my thing. Once I stopped working I haven't touched anything related to any of it. The newest of the books are for a 2008 edition of the software... useless.

(Even more totally OT, I just googled the software product I was working with back then and my name. There were over ten pages of matches. The web accumulates stuff, but isn't so good at forgetting.)
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I have to figure out if it is trash or recycle for Britannica, my old computer books from my years in IT, my wife's college text books.

Normally I would say recycle, but I again would encourage you to check in with your local school district. There's nothing normal about these times and they may have a use for them. If the text books are English Litt or something timeless, there may be use for them as well. If distance learning, some kids won't have endless internet, so these resources might be the basis for a report, or the Nat. Geos cut up for some project.

In normal times, no one would take our encyclopedia or textbooks so they went to recylce.

IP
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I have to figure out if it is trash or recycle for Britannica, my old computer books from my years in IT, my wife's college text books.

I find it easy to list old books as used books for sale on Amazon. I have about 200 books listed and sell maybe half a dozen per year.

Sales on Ebay require a bidder right away, but Amazon lets you wait for a buyer.

You can easily find out what books are worth on Amazon. If less than $10, I think you may as well donate them to the library. And many mass printed books are worth only pennies. But some can be worth over $200. Well worth the effort. Plus I'm mostly getting rid of old technical books. I want them to go to someone who appreciates them.

To sell a book, you search for it on Amazon. If used pricing is interesting, tell them you have a similar one for sale. You enter your info and grade the quality, add notes on any defects, and wait for an order.

The listing is free until the book sells. Then Amazon gets about $2.50 plus 15% of the selling price (I think but I may not be up to date). Buyer pays $3.99 for shipping (but seller can ask for more). The fees are the reason my minimum is $10 selling price.

Whenever one of my books sells my first move is the review competitive pricing on all my books. It's easy to match the competitive pricing. You can undercut if you like but of course then value drifts downward. I usually find when one of mine sells it was the cheapest on the list. Competitors had increased their price and I had failed to increase mine.

Books sales is kind of an art, but to me any thing received is like free money.
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Thanks for that, Paul.

My sisters do some business selling stuff online, books included. I don't remember where or how they sell books, but they've been at it for many years. If I find enough books worth trying to sell I'll probably make the trip down to them in south NJ for them to sell and keep the proceeds. I also have a lot of old magazines, most of which will be recycled but some I think will be worth a few bucks, and I will probably do the same thing with them.
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I'm feeling burned out.

Oh my. Take some time off to decompress. Besides, good time to be in a rental as there is a good chance we are heading into a down market for real estate. Hit the ground running after you are rested.

Thanks. I just did a sketch of my "dream house" so that going forward I have an idea of what lot size I'll need. It has to be big enough to fit the house, and small enough that there isn't too much yard to maintain. Obviously, the most important thing about a house is "location, location, location," so if a lot or teardown becomes available in the perfect location, the house plan can be tweaked accordingly, to a point.

I've also been thinking about how important it is to have a "dream house," or even to have our own house as opposed to continuing to rent. The rental we're in now is great: wonderful floor plan, condition, neighborhood, and price (for what a new house would cost, we could stay where we are for 30 years, or 15 given rent will certainly go up, but still). The only issue is we're between a highway and railroad tracks, not close enough to see them, but close enough to get the noise, which I might or might not get used to.

Other random thoughts:
- How much do we want to spend? We don't want to be house-poor again. And, does high end really make us that much happier? For example, I love tiled bathrooms, but my current bathroom has a prefab acrylic tub/shower and concrete floors, and it's great: spacious, bright and clean, no grout or caulk to get dirty, and looks fine. Not luxurious, but kind of a vacation cabin feel, which is also good. Will probably do something similar in my custom house, only with a different paint color. However, I do think I'd get a bump-up of happiness every time I see my new staircase if it's something like www.viewrail.com, and the configuration on my sketch would be about $22k. A boring staircase would be just as functional, but, blah. If I'm going to the expense of a custom house, I don't want it to be blah.
- I hear about young men having video game addictions and wonder: do I have a home-improvement addiction? I really loved the planning and decision-making involved in previous renovations (didn't love when contractors botched things), and when I recently sketched my dream house I was hyper-focused to the point of skipping meals. I'm trying to think of what I'll do with my time after I move into my dream house, and just start doing that now.
- It feels wrong to be so invested in a house, especially seeing others' houses destroyed by fire, hurricanes, etc. And, seeing elderly hyper-attached to their houses even after they can no longer safely live there. And, 2020. Well, even prior to 2020 I agonized about spending $$$ on a painting as opposed to donating more to worthy causes, so I do have an ongoing challenge of how best to use my time and money...

Meanwhile, I didn't get any annuals this year (is it worth risking my life for geraniums? no), but when I was at Lowes' yesterday for something else (essential), I bought mums. So now there's a row of bright yellow along the side of my patio, and I was happy to water them this morning. A good way to start each day, going forward.

YG
rambling
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- How much do we want to spend? We don't want to be house-poor again. And, does high end really make us that much happier? For example, I love tiled bathrooms, but my current bathroom has a prefab acrylic tub/shower and concrete floors, and it's great: spacious, bright and clean, no grout or caulk to get dirty, and looks fine.

Yes, not a fan of dealing with grout. Don't know how expensive it is, but I like the idea of a stone slab shower surround:

https://www.remodeling.hw.net/products/kitchen-bath/forzasto...

As for a tub, in my dream bathroom I would get a Japanese soaking tub. Really hate having body parts sticking out of the water during a soak. Obligatory kid tub for resale in a different bath.

- I hear about young men having video game addictions and wonder: do I have a home-improvement addiction? I really loved the planning and decision-making involved in previous renovations...

I used to think I had this problem with buying investment properties, but realized that I can act instantly when I see something that's right. If I equivocate, it's because there is an issue, either one that I've already identified but not sure it's that big a deal, or something I have not quite put a finger on. Some of us are just planners on steroids, and for me I find the planning process to be soothing.

IP,
with way too many 10 year profit projection spreadsheets for investment real estate in my Excel folder
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It's getting real.

I'm the OP for the thread, and all that remains is for the lawyers to schedule the closing, and the closing itself. The down payment and such has arrived in my checking account (from my IRA, minus a painful pile of taxes) and should be available tomorrow. The original closing date, picked out of the air when I made my offer, was Monday Aug 31, and it may actually happen then. This despite a multi-day power outage that impacted both realtors, the mortgage outfit, my attorney, town hall, and pretty much everyone else involved.

I have a walk-through scheduled for tomorrow to take a few pictures of my own and some accurate measurements. And to generally check the condition, see if a few things promised to be left were left, and so forth.

Once I sell the old place I am thinking that some of that money will go toward solar with Powerwalls, and another part will buy the Tesla I have been holding off on. At 2.75% I won't be in any big hurry to pay off my mortgage early, not that I am likely to see the last payment since I would be 97. 8-)
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...closing date ... Monday Aug 31...

I hope all went well!
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It went fine, overall.

When I got the details at 10 am for how to pay it turned out to be a wire transfer. I almost went to my usual branch but thankfully checked the banks app and found it was closed because of Covid. That could have wasted time. Picked another branch, waited in line, and was told it could not be done by a teller. To see a banker is supposed to require an appointment. I told her I was closing today and they fit me in. Fortunately the bank it was going to was just another branch of the same bank.

Not enough time to go home again so I got gas and lunch, arrived at the attorney’s for the 1 pm appointment.

And signed and signed and signed and signed... All the many previous signatures had been on line. Countless, over a month. Now I had to sign and date on paper every one of the ones I had done before. Eventually that was done and the attorney went off and wire transferred the money again to the seller and previous mortgage bank. Such is closing under Covid.

Then I sat. And sat. And sat. I couldn’t have access until the receipt by both parties was confirmed. I finally left without the access code (keys in the house), went home, put some odds and ends together, and waited for the clearance and code, which came around 5 pm.

My daughter, grandkids and son in law got there a bit after I did and we spent a couple of hours poking around. They left, I’m about to.

The place is beautiful.

I have so much to do!
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Congrats!
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Thanks!

I think I disappointed my daughter a bit by not being excited. Because of Covid neither of my youngest granddaughters had been able to see the place until tonight.
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...some of that money will go to solar with PowerWalls...

I understand E Musk is presenting a long-delayed Battery Day in two weeks. Hopefully this will be a harbinger of next gen PowerWalls becoming available in the next 12 months or so.

FWIW. I know I’ve been holding off expanding my solar for a few reasons, that being one.

(Congratulations on your new house!)

— sutton
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I understand E Musk is presenting a long-delayed Battery Day in two weeks. Hopefully this will be a harbinger of next gen PowerWalls becoming available in the next 12 months or so.

FWIW. I know I’ve been holding off expanding my solar for a few reasons, that being one.


Went on their website and it recommended $21,000 spend for an estimated 1 day of reserve power.

1 day? Maybe I'm reading that wrong.
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I have no expectations from Battery Day. Hopes, but no expectations.

I just played with configurations on the Tesla site.

I threw in an electric bill of $210 per month. That is about $90 more than I have now in the old house without central air, electric hot water, or a Tesla Y to charge. It is far less than my daughter across town with a house full of people, at least three refrigerators, AC, pool pump, etc.

The configuration it came up with is:

12.24 kW Solar Panels for #24,600, 3 Powerwalls for $19,500, and other stuff to a cash total of $45,100.

Minus Federal Tax Credit of -$10,771
CT Green Bank Solar Rebate -$3,672
And an odd deduction, ConnectedSolutions, a program where I agree to allowing the grid to pull from the Powerwalls ONLY during key evening hours when demand requires it. They estimate that will get me back -$10,500 over five years.

They estimate the 25 year savings at $56,716.

But getting back to days of reserve power, the combination of the 3 Powerwalls and solar gives an estimate based on being careful:

9 Days Backup Duration
Includes plugs, lights, 120V appliances, and some 240V appliances


I don't suppose I'd be drying a lot of clothes, charging the car, or running much AC, but it would keep the well pump operating and the refrigerator and freezer on.
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How does this: allowing the grid to pull from the Powerwalls ONLY during key evening hours when demand requires it.

correspond with this: 9 Days Backup Duration
Includes plugs, lights, 120V appliances, and some 240V appliances
... but it would keep the well pump operating and the refrigerator and freezer on.


Seems to me that in the event of a prolonged power outage, the grid would suck you dry the first evening. Because if your power is out then EVERYBODY'S power is out, and hence the demand would be there.
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Seems to me that in the event of a prolonged power outage, the grid would suck you dry the first evening. Because if your power is out then EVERYBODY'S power is out, and hence the demand would be there.

If the power is out, that means that the grid is damaged. How would it be pulling to supply others when it's damaged and can't get power to you or others?

That said, I would agree that pulling from the powerwalls, when they're supposed to be your backup, is kind of scary. In theory, they should recharge the next day, assuming it's pretty sunny again, but what if there's a big storm (so it's not sunny) and the power goes out? Then you're out of power from the grid, and from your powerwalls, with limited daytime only solar. Is there a way that the amount of power that's pulled from the powerwalls can be limited to just pulling 2/3 of the powerwall power, leaving you with 1/3 (3 days) as your backup?

AJ
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In the case of extreme weather they are not allowed to pull power from the Powerwall. Also note the five hour window when they can draw.

Incentives for home batteries are based on the average kilowatt (kW) used per event, averaged over the season. There are two seasons you can enroll in. All events will occur between 2:00 pm and 7:00 pm. You will be notified before any event. If there is an extreme weather event in the forecast, we will not draw energy from your battery.

https://www.eversource.com/content/ema-c/residential/save-mo...
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The one day or three days or nine days all assume your solar system is charging the Powerwall during the day. It is the combination that provides that time span.
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The one day or three days or nine days all assume your solar system is charging the Powerwall during the day. It is the combination that provides that time span.

If what you say is correct, then they are what? shading the truth? Lying? Lying by omitting material facts?

Long time ago I was in California for half a year. There was a stretch in there where we did not see the sun for 2 weeks solid.

WGNTV, Chicago, Jan 29, 2017: "Today marks 8 consecutive days without even the tiniest glimpse of the sun."


Because what I would care about is how long my power lasts in adverse conditions, not in perfect conditions where the only bad thing is the power to my house is out.

And despite all their pinky-swear promises to not suck all your power, if I ever installed a powerwall there *WOULD* also be a manual cutoff switch under my control to isolate my house from the grid.
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Because what I would care about is how long my power lasts in adverse conditions, not in perfect conditions where the only bad thing is the power to my house is out.

I don't believe the numbers are based on perfect conditions, but rather typical conditions. I suspect your eight days without sun was atypical. And if the only bad thing is that your power is out the power company should have plenty of people available to deal with it, unlike a wide-spread outage.

... if I ever installed a powerwall there *WOULD* also be a manual cutoff switch under my control to isolate my house from the grid.

Of course there would be, that switch is standard equipment. People who want to find out how well their system works off the grid use it to find out.
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