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I know, being retired is a full time vacation. But I found that even in retirement I can get into doing the same things all the time. I have developed routines even in retirement.

So this year I decided to take a vacation from retirement. But instead of going "away" I decided to take that budgeted money and see the things in my own area that I never experienced.

Of course, many of these activities were the expensive ones that I avoided while living frugally.

So, instead of going somewhere different. I decided to spend the money on my own area. I went to the chamber of commerce and picked up the booklet"101 things to do in this area". I cannot believe the places I did not know even existed.

I can now experience some of the more expensive places in my area. I am saving the cost of airfare, car rental and hotel. I am adding to my local economy. And I am enjoying learning more about the place I live in.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Bravo, Kath!

We're doing that, too. We want to eventually "eat our way across the USA" -- as we put it -- staying in inns and B&B's along the way. This May, we hope to take a jaunt up into Ontario and across to the upper peninsula of Michigan and down into that state to "look around". (We've done the southern thing, exploring most all of the states east of the Mississippi, and over into Texas and Oklahoma, so we want to try the "northern route" next -- out into the Dakotas, Montana, Idaho, etc.

Yes, there's a lot to see nearby. (With gas going higher and higher, why not save a few bucks, too?)

Off season is great if you're retired, too. (The coast of Maine can be wonderful in April or early May, before the kids get out of school, and while rates are dirt cheap, for example.)

Enjoy!

Vermonter
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"So this year I decided to take a vacation from retirement. But instead of going "away" I decided to take that budgeted money and see the things in my own area that I never experienced.

Of course, many of these activities were the expensive ones that I avoided while living frugally.

So, instead of going somewhere different. I decided to spend the money on my own area. I went to the chamber of commerce and picked up the booklet"101 things to do in this area". I cannot believe the places I did not know even existed."

Many folks live in a city or near one, and never get to see even 1/4 of what is there. If you live near Washington DC, you can spend weeks seeing the various things around DC, many of them free or dirt cheap.

Same for NYC - hundreds of things to do, from riding the Staten Island ferry (very cheap) to Central Park, to museums, bookstores, historical places, Statue of Liberty, UN building, etc.

I suspect the same for Baltimore and Boston and Chicago.

I live in Dallas, and have yet to see everything in Dallas and Ft. Worth....

Also places around here where you can rent a sailboat for a few hours, or ride a real restored railroad, etc. Within a few hours drive, even more things to do and see.

Or, another idea is to visit a friend in their city, and check out all the things....they know the ropes of how to get around. If y'all are retired, and their retired, then time is usually not a problem.

t.

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Great advice, foolkath!

I'm not retired and especially because I spend most of my time at work, I have not seen very much outside of my regular route to work, stores, friends' houses. (Boo-hoo, don't you just feel sorry for me?) I do plan to take lots of day trips, hopefully mostly by bike if I am still in shape, when I retire.

I'm familiar with our downtown because I do have the weekends to go occasionally, but even adjacent towns would be fun to explore.

flipstress
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