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Thanks tj. I'm going to scroll that board, before posting. I see several relevant threads.

😀
ralph
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I've paid cash for the last 4 vehicles I've purchased.

I don't see how financing would be a problem if you have a high FICO score and enough money to retire.

intercst
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Just curious if anyone has bought a car since retiring. With no pay slip were you able to get financing, or you just paid cash?

My parents (85-95 yrs old) always paid with a credit card to get the points. Points used to pay for overseas trips (China, NZ, France, etc). Now they can't drive, so they got rid of the old car they owned (Saturn). They leased a car a few years ago and did not get a replacement vehicle when the lease ended last year.
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I've bought one since retiring but I paid cash.
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MDH bought a car and took financing (for a 6 month minimum) to get a better price. We were prepared to pay cash, if that got a better price.
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I've been researching a new vehicle, and plan to buy in the next couple of months.

My FICO is over 800.

While I can pay cash, I plan to push for financing at 1.9% or less. I've seen some offers for 0% from Toyota, and 1.9% from Honda. But that's on vehicles I don't particularly want. I've been eyeing Honda CR-V and Subaru Forester.

I'd thought I might visit with the "money guy" before actually choosing a vehicle. If they won't work the money with me upfront, I'm willing to walk.

I don't "need" a new car, I "want" one.

Any thoughts on how to approach it?

🙂
ralph
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I've been researching a new vehicle, and plan to buy in the next couple of months.

My FICO is over 800.

While I can pay cash, I plan to push for financing at 1.9% or less. I've seen some offers for 0% from Toyota, and 1.9% from Honda. But that's on vehicles I don't particularly want. I've been eyeing Honda CR-V and Subaru Forester.

I'd thought I might visit with the "money guy" before actually choosing a vehicle. If they won't work the money with me upfront, I'm willing to walk.

I don't "need" a new car, I "want" one.

Any thoughts on how to approach it?

Ralph
=================
Ralph ask on this board:https://boards.fool.com/buying-and-maintaining-a-car-100143....
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"I've bought one since retiring but I paid cash." - FCorelli


Yeah, me too. It's a good feeling to be able to do that.

Art
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2 cars.

The first we paid cash for. The second we paid about half in cash and got a 0% loan from Subaru for the rest. We filled out the financing info and the sales person went away for about 20 minutes. We thought we'd been forgotten about. He came back and said we were approved in about 5 minutes. The rest of the time he was gone he was getting the car ready for us to drive home and filling out some more paperwork for the finance and insurance rep. Post retirement, we have also taken out a 15 year mortgage at 2.625% to add on our geezer suite, bedroom, bathroom, laundry room on the main floor. The process took a few days not minutes, but there were no snags because we were retired. Funny thing is that since taking on this debt our credit scores have gone from the 820-830 to 840-850.

We could have paid cash for the car and the house, but with the interest rates below what we were earning on the money we felt it was better to take out the loans.
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ralph:"While I can pay cash, I plan to push for financing at 1.9% or less. I've seen some offers for 0% from Toyota, and 1.9% from Honda. But that's on vehicles I don't particularly want. I've been eyeing Honda CR-V and Subaru Forester.

I'd thought I might visit with the "money guy" before actually choosing a vehicle. If they won't work the money with me upfront, I'm willing to walk."

-------

I've been retired now over 20 years. I've bought several - paid cash - after a reasonable amount of haggling and shopping. Put 200,000 miles on them in 7 years.

For a long time, the GM Card was a good deal. 5% credit on purchases toward a new GM card up to $500/yr. I reached that every year and wound up buying a new GM car every 7 years or so with the money ($3500) as part of payment. They've changed it now to $250 a year credit so my next car might not be a GM car.....maybe a Subaru.

Anyway, low or zero financing costs you. They'll give you another thousand off likely instead of that financing...sometimes more.

I did have a friend who looked at the numbers. they gave him a thousand 'incentive bucks' to finance and it came out less. He financed it , got the super deal, then paid it off 2 months later - made sure there was no pre-payment clause.....

Me? I'd rather pay cash, but don't mention that till the end. They always want you to finance it as they get a big chunk of cash from the finance company. And the saleman and manager get goodie points and more bucks.

Car salesmen always want to talk 'how much can you afford?' and 'payments per month' - trying to upsell you to the maximum you can pay per month. I really, really, really hate that. Plus the 'you deserve to be driving a XXX car'......

Good luck on your new car adventures...

t.
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I have not yet retired. But we only pay cash for cars now.

I do know that my mom specifically purchased a new car 5 years before she planned on retiring. Her goal was to have it paid off when she retired.


c
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We bought two new cars in 2017, both from Toyota.

They were running a promotion at the time for certain cars, so we got a Sienna with their 0% loan. FICO over 800, approval in minutes, they didn't care about income.

But the Highlander was not part of the promotion because it is in higher demand. So we paid cash for that.

Toyota and other manuf. are running these promotions all the time.
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Thanks tj. I'm going to scroll that board, before posting. I see several relevant threads.

😀
ralph
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I've paid cash in retirement. Likewise for my house.

My parents, who had always paid cash for cars while working, leased 2 cars in succession in retirement (under the influence of new friends and my brother who leased a succession of cars through his business). Mom bought the 2nd leased car at the end of its lease (my influence ;-) She drove it for 19 years, till I persuaded her to donate it.
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I have only paid cast for car purchases for awhile now, including the Jeep I purchased a month or so ago. But dealers want to sell you a car, so I can't imagine that my lack of a salary would make them hesitate. Dealers today know more about your financial situation than you before you even get to the negotiation stage.

I notice one post about using a credit card to purchase. I've had one experience when I decided to try to use my credit card to purchase a car a few years ago and it didn't turn out as I had hoped. I used to negotiate on car purchases for days or weeks before buying - usually with multiple dealers. One of the tactics dealers try to use is wasting your time. They want to keep you sitting and waiting and negotiating as long as possible figuring that the more you are already invested, the more they can get out of you. But you can turn that around on them if you have the patience. Eventually, car sales people want to make the sale to get rid of you. I had been through the negotiation and reached a price I was willing to pay and they were ready to accept when I informed them that I wanted to use a credit card for the purchase. That caused a problem in the back room and the manager came out to inform me that I would have to pay the 5% credit card fee on top of the purchase price if I wanted to use my card. I just wrote a check instead. I don't know if I could have negotiated further and gotten them to back down from the 5% CC charge.

In recent years, I've decided that my time is worth more to me than to spend it negotiating for days with car sales people. I do my due diligence and check as many of the car sales web sites that tell me what to expect as a good deal in my area, then shoot for a price that meets or is below that. If that price for the car I am considering seems like good value to me, I make the deal and drive away. I should also point out that I only purchase a new vehicle about once every 200,000 to 250,000 miles, so I don't buy vehicles more than once every 5 or 6 years. We have two vehicles (one high mileage car to do errands and trips, and an off-road vehicle for adventures), or it would be even longer between exposure to the ugly car sales system.
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I’ve paid cash for all of my cars over the years and my 1st Harley motorcycle. I only got a loan for my first motorcycle in 1978, Honda 400cc, just to establish credit....I had read that that was important for woman to do. :)

I don’t like debt at all.

Lucky Dog
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PucksFool: We could have paid cash for the car and the house, but with the interest rates below what we were earning on the money we felt it was better to take out the loans.

Bingo! Our house mortgage is at 3%. No rush to pay it off.

CNC
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sqeee: I do my due diligence and check as many of the car sales web sites that tell me what to expect as a good deal in my area, then shoot for a price that meets or is below that.

How do you get that information? On the interwebs I have to give them contact information before they will give me price numbers. I suppose I could give the your information. Heh.

CNC
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Lucky Dog: I’ve paid cash for all of my cars over the years and my 1st Harley motorcycle. I only got a loan for my first motorcycle in 1978, Honda 400cc, just to establish credit....I had read that that was important for woman to do. :)

In my experience very few Honda owners would even consider buying a farm implement like Harley. Maybe as we get older our bottoms like the softer seats and ride.

CNC
😁
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FWIW, I usually check this site for what people are paying for a given new vehicle.

https://www.truecar.com/?site3&srcID=google&cmID=Gen...

Here's a Jetta, for example:
https://www.truecar.com/prices-new/volkswagen/jetta-pricing/...

Edmunds offers this:
https://www.edmunds.com/tmv.html
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I don't see how financing would be a problem if you have a high FICO score and enough money to retire.

In my experience they want a payslip (proof of employment). Doesn't matter that my FICO is over 800. But maybe if I had said "no" they would have charged a higher rate? Don't know.

I would not take on high-interest payments. Give me 0% or 1%, fine. Much more than that and I'd rather just pay it off.

The only risk for a low-interest loan is if the market goes south, and then the dollars in my investments are not returning as much as paying off the car (or a house, for that matter) would return. But when the markets are returning high single-digits then carrying the debt makes sense. (Not telling anyone anything new.)

I do need a new car, but I think we are on the cusp of a large transition to EVs. I'd rather not buy a fossil-burner only to have it obsolete in two years (i.e. more obsolete than a car would be after two years anyway).

1poorguy
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1pg: FWIW, I usually check this site for what people are paying for a given new vehicle.

https://www.truecar.com/?site3&srcID=google&cmID=Gen......


Thanks. But when I get to the end it wants an e-mail address before it will give me an actual selling price. MSRP, yes.

CNC
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If you look at the Jetta page you can see their chart (see what others paid). It shows MSRP, invoice, and market average. There is some explanation if you click on "What is this pricing information?".
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""I do need a new car, but I think we are on the cusp of a large transition to EVs. I'd rather not buy a fossil-burner only to have it obsolete in two years (i.e. more obsolete than a car would be after two years anyway).""

Any such transition will take decades. The current US fleet is the oldest average it has ever been as car quality has increased. I would not be very concerned about a car becoming obsolete in 2 years. There are far too many older cars for a 2 year old car to be obsolete.

my family's vehicles
1. 2002 with 205,000 miles (8 passenger SUV)
2. 2003 with 255,000 miles (Honda Civic for long distance travel)
3. 2005 with 140,000 miles (F350 for pulling a livestock trailer)
4. 2009 with 155,000 miles (Tacoma for light duty pickup work)

We are not even in the market for a new or newer vehicle now as these older ones suit our needs and run reliably.


c
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I do need a new car, but I think we are on the cusp of a large transition to EVs. I'd rather not buy a fossil-burner only to have it obsolete in two years (i.e. more obsolete than a car would be after two years anyway).

1poorguy


There are certain mentalities who will continue to use fuel burners just to spite the Libs (or whatever). I read a few years ago about a German guy who was hoarding incandescent light bulbs for the evil day when they would no longer be available. That day has arrived. Funny thing - the world did not end. I can get long lasting LED's for a good price, with the light in a variety of coors, from bright white to almost yellow.

So will it be with EV's and gas burners.

CNC
... time to short Standard Oil?
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Oh Count, don’t flatter me. :)

Well, I know some folks back then called my bike a tractor....but I still remember flying down the highway at 100 miles an hr....it’s amazing what you can do under the influence at a young age with a pack of other bikers. One thing I remember about that short experience was that the mirrors were vibrating so much I couldn’t see anything. I’m lucky to have survived. :)


It’s nice to remember those carefree days though....easy rider and all that...plus Born to be Wild.


We were all young and stupid once....I slowly grew out of it and learned from my experiences.

Oh about the Honda 400 purchase. Way back then, I had read an article in one of my Daddy’s Playboy...located in the bathroom, that spoke of the high rate of accidents with riders who didn’t know how to use a clutch and shift gears with hands and feet and they highlighted this sweet looking Honda...Hondamatic(no clutch) 400 cc. Perfect starter bike. So I got it in 1978 and loved it and it started every time I kicked it or used the ignition. It had gears but no clutch. Meanwhile, I had a friend who had one of those trail bikes...low cc and he let me practice on it in dirt field. I remember it didn’t have much of a seat.

Anyway, after one practice outing, I was hot to trot to get a Harley, so I bought one in 1978 as well. 1000 cc. Later I bought a used 1200 cc FatBob SuperGlide. Choice of colors back then was simple.....black. :)

I had the Harley shop sell the Roadster on consignment so I didn’t have to deal with any ne’er do-wells at my home...you know how they can do that midnight shopping.

Anyway, I rode until 2001 I think. Electrical problems which was common back then and 2 shops couldn’t do a permanent fix and my knee couldn’t take kicking it anymore so I made the sad decision to donate to charity so it wouldn’t rot in my garage....fare thee well my sometimes faithful steed!

Have you looked at the price tags of the fully outfitted bikes now...not just Harley’s either but I must admit, they sure are a lot more cushier than the old days...heck you can buy an electric one now...vrrrmmmm....buzzzzzz..

Lucky Dog
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But I digress way down memory lane....oh where was I? Yes, pay cash for everything. :)
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cattleman: my family's vehicles
1. 2002 with 205,000 miles (8 passenger SUV)
2. 2003 with 255,000 miles (Honda Civic for long distance travel)
3. 2005 with 140,000 miles (F350 for pulling a livestock trailer)
4. 2009 with 155,000 miles (Tacoma for light duty pickup work)


Heh. My wife's 2001 Chrysler PT Cruiser is creeping up on 100,000 miles. She doesn't drive much. We got it in August 2000 when the PT Cruiser was a novelty. So, 19 years old.

She used it as a sales car in her small drapery and window covering business, so we had put signs on it. The vinyl stick-on letters and a logo. 3 places for the logo, three places for a list of products offered, some room for a phone number and a contractor's license number (required by the state of CA.) I spent last week removing those signs. The vinyl didn't want to peel off easily, so I used various thinners in my endeavors. Got it all off and had the car washed. So we have a 2001 PT Cruiser in virtually cherry condition (scratch on right front fender). Looks almost new.

CNC
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"I do need a new car, but I think we are on the cusp of a large transition to EVs. I'd rather not buy a fossil-burner only to have it obsolete in two years (i.e. more obsolete than a car would be after two years anyway)."


Unless you live in Europe, 98% of car sales here for the next few years will be IC or hybrid cars.

Until you have charging stations that can recharge you to 90% in 15 minutes or less, it's not going to be 'ev' land here.....

t.
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"Thanks. But when I get to the end it wants an e-mail address before it will give me an actual selling price. MSRP, yes."


that's why I have 2 spare junk email accounts I almost never look at.....

t.
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"Just curious if anyone has bought a car since retiring. With no pay slip were you able to get financing, or you just paid cash?

I may retire before we buy a car, and this thought occurred to me.

1poorguy "

****************************************************************************
I have bought 2 new cars over the past year. I paid cash for both cars but could have
financed (and had loans arranged through a credit union) before I bought.
We ended up replacing a 10 year old Honda minivan with a new Honda minivan and
replaced a 2003 Saturn with a Hyundai Accent.

Howie52
In passing the new safety features on autos are a plus. I was surprised at how
often the lane maintenance features come in handy. Standard back-up camera is
also a help. Blind-spot detection is also a good feature worth paying more for.
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How do you get that information? On the interwebs I have to give them contact information before they will give me price numbers. I suppose I could give the your information. Heh.

Since I haven't looked at car pricing for a couple of months, I couldn't tell you all the web sites I used. It doesn't pay to bookmark them after I've purchased since 5 or 6 years from now when I want to car shop again, they won't be the same and some other site will be better. I'm pretty sure I still found Edmunds to be valuable and AAA car buying, but there were others I found by exercising my google prowess. :-)

I do have one junk email account that I give when web sites demand one. And SGSpouse and I chose the alias of Jill and Edward Forsythe many years ago when we ran across an RV set up in the middle of nowhere with very elaborate strings of lights and lawn art surrounding it. They had a custom carved wooden sign that had "Jill and Edward Forsythe" written on it. Eventually when we didn't want to reveal who we were, we not only adopted the names, but when we were traveling in places that are not so hospitable to Americans, we gave Jill and Edward Canadian citizenship. So whenever we travel or virtual travel via the internet, when we encounter people who want to know who we are but we don't really know them or what their motives might be, we are Canadians Jill and Edward Forsythe.
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Any such transition will take decades. The current US fleet is the oldest average it has ever been as car quality has increased.

Sorry. I should have been more clear in my wording. Yes, the deployed fleet will take decades to transition. I should have said "large transition to EV offerings". In other words, more will be available for purchase (which will hopefully bring prices down into the non-luxury range). Volkswagen is going to have an EV version of every model they make (last time I knew), Nissan already has one (Leaf) and likely will have more, Kia will be offering them, etc.

Today there are very few that aren't in the luxury range (e.g. Tesla). In perhaps two years that should change dramatically.

1poorguy (1998 Jeep Cherokee, just shy of 100K miles)
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In passing the new safety features on autos are a plus. I was surprised at how
often the lane maintenance features come in handy. Standard back-up camera is
also a help. Blind-spot detection is also a good feature worth paying more for.


Yes, I have test driven vehicles with these features, and would not even consider buying one today that didn't have the full suite. Lane-departure warning, lane-keeping, blind-spot detection, adaptive cruise control, cross-traffic alert, back-up camera...those are probably even more valuable than an airbag because they a) help prevent the need for an airbag, and b) get used every time you're behind the wheel. (But obviously I want the full array of airbags too.)
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...Lane-departure warning, lane-keeping, blind-spot detection, adaptive cruise control, cross-traffic alert, back-up camera...those are probably even more valuable than an airbag because they a) help prevent the need for an airbag, and b) get used every time you're behind the wheel. (But obviously I want the full array of airbags too.)

Air bags are pretty important, but I was impressed with all these safety features available on my new Jeep. When I started shopping, I was looking at how to keep costs down and figured I would not purchase all these safety bells and whistles. But after a test drive, I was sold and had to start my pricing all over to include all these features that depend on the side looking radar. Now, whenever I drive my old Hyundai Accent, I miss the rear camera and side looking radar alerts. I feel almost naked without them.
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I know exactly what you mean. One of the first test drives I did the sales dude said "exit here" (off the freeway), and as I did he said "don't touch the brake". It was really unnerving going up the ramp (it was up) towards a few cars stopped at the light, but the adaptive cruise control and emergency braking saw the distance and stopped the car right behind one of the waiting vehicles. It was seriously cool. And having the car complain if you put on your turn signal when there's a car next to you also is very cool. As you said, knowing my Jeep has none of that makes me feel vulnerable in a way. Even if my Jeep is a couple tons of steel (not much plastic on this one!).
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Oh...I forgot one feature I saw (but wasn't on a smaller vehicle...just the vans) was a side camera. So if you put on your signal the screen on the console showed you the view of what was next to you. If you were in a curb lane it would show bikes, pedestrians, etc. Objects potentially too small to register on a normal blind-side detector.

That was on a courtesy van when I took my mom's Honda in for service.
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Oh...I forgot one feature I saw (but wasn't on a smaller vehicle...just the vans) was a side camera. So if you put on your signal the screen on the console showed you the view of what was next to you. If you were in a curb lane it would show bikes, pedestrians, etc. Objects potentially too small to register on a normal blind-side detector.


Mrs mazske drives a 2017 Honda Civic that has this feature. I think most Civics and Accords now have it.

Fool on,

mazske
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We have paid cash for our cars for about the last 20 years. Retired 7 years ago.

Isewquilts... doesn’t like car payments
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sqeeee: SGSpouse and I chose the alias of Jill and Edward Forsythe many years ago when we ran across an RV set up in the middle of nowhere with very elaborate strings of lights and lawn art surrounding it. They had a custom carved wooden sign that had "Jill and Edward Forsythe" written on it. Eventually when we didn't want to reveal who we were, we not only adopted the names, but when we were traveling in places that are not so hospitable to Americans, we gave Jill and Edward Canadian citizenship. So whenever we travel or virtual travel via the internet, when we encounter people who want to know who we are but we don't really know them or what their motives might be, we are Canadians Jill and Edward Forsythe.

Excellent!

Charlie Parker
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On the build your Honda CR-V site, one of the extras for the Touring model was a sensor that watched for speed limit signs and then would display the speed limit for the driver's viewing pleasure.

I thought that would be a great asset.

🙂
ralph
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On the build your Honda CR-V site, one of the extras for the Touring model was a sensor that watched for speed limit signs and then would display the speed limit for the driver's viewing pleasure.

I thought that would be a great asset.


I notice that GPS systems I've used lately all provide speed limit information on the maps. But that must be stored information because it doesn't seem to know if the speed is reduced due to road work.
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I hear that Waze (Google now owns it) now has speed limit info. Waze, when I used it was on the iPad, and NOT hands free, therefore dangerous. I stopped using it.

🙂
ralph
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<<On the build your Honda CR-V site, one of the extras for the Touring model was a sensor that watched for speed limit signs and then would display the speed limit for the driver's viewing pleasure.

I thought that would be a great asset.
>>




"Displaying the speed" seems pretty pedestrian.


How 'bout a virtual mother in law spouting off how to drive from the back seat?



Seattle Pioneer
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I hear that Waze (Google now owns it) now has speed limit info. Waze, when I used it was on the iPad, and NOT hands free, therefore dangerous. I stopped using it.

</snip>


I have Android Auto on my smartphone and recently bought a $6 mount at Walmart so that I could use it hands-free.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/TSV-Universal-Car-Dashboard-Cell-...

Why pay an extra $4,000 to $5,000 for a built in, dashboard GPS system when you already got one on your phone?

intercst
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ralph: On the build your Honda CR-V site, one of the extras for the Touring model was a sensor that watched for speed limit signs and then would display the speed limit for the driver's viewing pleasure.

Our gps tells us the speed limit. Also chimes it we enter a school zone.

CNC
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""Today there are very few that aren't in the luxury range (e.g. Tesla). In perhaps two years that should change dramatically.""

That makes more sense. In does seem more likely that in a few years, you will have more options. But ice vehicles really won't be obsolete until there are too few gas stations left to provide fuel in a reliable manner.


c
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Count. Hi Eddie!
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Why pay an extra $4,000 to $5,000 for a built in, dashboard GPS system when you already got one on your phone?

To reduce the temptation of checking a text/email/facebook/incoming call on your phone, even when hands-free?

(Personally I am good with my phone, although when I was driving my Dad's car with the dashboard GPS, it was pretty nice)
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My cell phone hooks wirelessly, and bluetooth, to my car receiver. I speak to my phone where I want to go and it confirms it and puts the map on my car receiver. I do not even have to touch the receiver anymore, everything is done with Android Auto. Best upgrade I ever did.

Andy
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I never wanted in-car GPS. Tesla is the first to have OTA updates. Everyone else is such that the GPS loaded into your car is what you're stuck with no matter what changes are made to the roads. To get an update you take it to the dealer and pay. So, yes, the phone in a cradle is better.

Texts and calls are just a matter of personal discipline. Just this morning I got a call while my phone was in its cradle. Swipe down to send to voicemail and keep driving. Texts are a non-starter while the car is moving. It's not that difficult. I don't understand why people don't seem to be able to do it.
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